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  • 1.
    Alaceva, Carolina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rusu, Lazar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Barriers in achieving business/IT alignment in a large Swedish company: What we have learned?2015In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 51, 715-728 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are still many organizations that face difficulties in achieving business/IT alignment. Prior research has focused on the positive impact of alignment on overall business performance, while the barriers in achieving business/IT alignment were largely unexplored, especially in regards to the social dimension that refers to the people involved in alignment. Therefore this research is focusing on identifying and investigating the barriers that inhibit achieving social dimension of business/IT alignment in large organizations. A case study is conducted in one of the largest Swedish companies. The data is collected through seven semi-structured interviews, field-notes and the use of company's documents that were thematically analyzed. The research presents a unique case of 19 business/IT alignment barriers of social dimension that have been limited so far and which contribute to the business/IT alignment field. The main findings showed that low understanding of counterpart's environment; poor communication; unclear specifications; limited cooperation and lack of mutual commitment and support inhibits the achievement of alignment between business and IT domains on the social dimension. The results could support the researchers to further elaborate frameworks on how to mitigate social barriers in order to achieve a better business/IT alignment. Besides, the discussed barriers can be of practical use for other organizations trying to achieve business/IT alignment with a focus on the social dimension.

  • 2.
    Eklund, Lina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Bridging the online/offline divide: The example of digital gaming2015In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 53, 527-535 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of virtual worlds are often based on the dichotomous 'real world'/'virtual world', yet research has indicated that this division is far from unproblematic. The aim of this study is to examine empirically the link between online/offline using the example of social online gaming. The data consist of individual and group interviews with 33 adult garners. The results explore three themes sociability and design; group membership; norms and rules and show how on-and offline are inexorably linked through the social organizational demands of Internet gaming. Individuals ground online group membership in offline relations and shared characteristics, aiming to maximize game-play gains and support sociability. Gaming with 'people like us' facilitates creation of norms and expectations, which aids in producing stable social groups. Thus the boundary between online and offline becomes contingent on links between people. The study shows how important offline connections are for online interaction.

  • 3.
    Eklund, Lina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Roman, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Do adolescent garners make friends offline? Identity and friendship formation in school2017In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 73, 284-289 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today adolescents grow up and make friends in an increasingly digital society, which has led to the study of potential effects of digital gaming on youths' friendships. To date studies have tended to focus on online settings with a knowledge gap concerning the role of gaming identity for friendship formation in offline settings. The current study addresses this, applying a longitudinal social network approach to investigate whether being a gamer impacts adolescent friendship formation. Data was collected by questionnaire from an entire cohort (n = 115) of pupils (age 16-18) on three occasions during their first year in a Swedish high school. Data was analysed using a stochastic actor oriented model, developed for testing hypotheses concerning social network changes. Results show that being similar in terms of identifying as a gamer at the later part, but not the start, of the school year makes a friendship 1.5 times more likely. We conclude that shared identities related to digital gaming influence individuals' offline, everyday social relationships as, in the analyses of changes over time to youths' school networks, digital gaming seems to motivate friendship formation.

  • 4.
    El-Mekawy, Mohamed
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rusu, Lazar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Perjons, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    An evaluation framework for comparing business-IT alignment models: A tool for supporting collaborative learning in organizations2015In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 51, no Part B, 1229-1247 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers and practitioners have argued on the importance of business-IT alignment (BITA) for organizations to maximize the business value of IT. As a result, a vast number of BITA models have been designed to support organizations in achieving, assessing and maintaining BITA. These models focus on different components (i.e. concepts/aspects of alignment) and emphasize different perspectives of the alignment (i.e. how alignment is perceived by practitioners). This makes it difficult for practitioners to choose an appropriate BITA model for a specific organization. In this paper, an evaluation framework to support practitioners in choosing appropriate BITA models is proposed. The framework was constructed following design science as a research approach. The design science activities were carried out in an iterative manner until reaching a final artefact. The process started with an extensive literature survey that led to designing a tentative model. Following that, different empirical iterations contributed to the framework development. The final framework consists of 25 criteria categorized into four groups. It was tested on six major BITA models, demonstrating its feasibility. Finally, the framework was evaluated by interviewing five business consultants and seven IT managers from large Swedish organizations. The evaluation shows that the framework has a complete set of criteria with a sufficient level of coherence, but its usability and efficiency is argued differently. The framework, additionally, is argued to potentially be used as a collaborative learning tool on requirement of BITA between practitioners from both business and IT domain or serve in the academic world.

  • 5. Steinberger, Fabius
    et al.
    Schroeter, Ronald
    Watling, Christopher N.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
    From road distraction to safe driving: Evaluating the effects of boredom and gamification on driving behaviour, physiological arousal, and subjective experience2017In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 75, 714-726 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Boredom and low levels of task engagement while driving can pose road safety risks, e.g., inattention during low traffic, routine trips, or semi-automated driving. Digital technology interventions that increase task engagement, e.g., through performance feedback, increased challenge, and incentives (often referred to as `gamification'), could therefore offer safety benefits. To explore the impact of such interventions, we conducted experiments in a high-fidelity driving simulator with thirty-two participants. In two counterbalanced conditions (control and intervention), we compared driving behaviour, physiological arousal, and subjective experience. Results indicate that the gamified boredom intervention reduced unsafe coping mechanisms such as speeding while promoting anticipatory driving. We can further infer that the intervention not only increased one's attention and arousal during the intermittent gamification challenges, but that these intermittent stimuli may also help sustain one's attention and arousal in between challenges and throughout a drive. At the same time, the gamified condition led to slower hazard reactions and short off-road glances. Our contributions deepen our understanding of driver boredom and pave the way for engaging interventions for safety critical tasks.

  • 6.
    Thorndike, Frances P.
    et al.
    University of Virginia Health System, USA.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköpings universitet.
    Smyth, Frederick L.
    University of Virginia, USA.
    Magee, Joshua C.
    University of Virginia Health System, USA.
    Gonder-Frederick, Linda
    University of Virginia Health System, USA.
    Öst, Lars-Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ritterband, Lee M.
    University of Virginia Health System, USA.
    Web-based measurement: Effect of completing single or multiple items per webpage2009In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 25, no 2, 393-401 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study was conducted to determine whether participants respond differently to online questionnaires presenting all items on a single webpage versus questionnaires presenting only one item per page, and whether participants prefer one format over the other. Of participants seeking self-help treatment on the Internet (for depression, social phobia, or panic disorder), 710 completed four questionnaires (Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Quality of Life Index, Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale) on the Internet on two occasions. The questionnaires were either presented with one questionnaire on one webpage (e.g., BDI on one webpage) or on multiple webpages (e.g., BDI on 21 webpages with one item each). Results suggest that the four web questionnaires measure the same construct across diagnostic group (depression, social phobia, panic), presentation type (single versus multiple items per page), and order of presentation (which format first). Within each diagnostic group, factor means for all questionnaires were equivalent across presentation method and time. Furthermore, factor means varied as expected across samples (e.g., depressed group scored higher on BDI), providing evidence of construct validity. The majority of participants in each diagnostic group preferred the single item per page format, even though this format required more time.

  • 7. Wang, Yanbo
    et al.
    Min, Qingfei
    Han, Shengnan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Understanding the effects of trust and risk on individual behavior toward social media platforms: A meta-analysis of the empirical evidence2016In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 56, 34-44 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trust and risk have been theorized and empirically approved as the most influential factors affecting individual behavior toward social media platforms (SMPs). However, the evidence is scattered and the understanding of the effects is ambiguous:To address this problem, a rigorous and quantitative meta analysis was conducted to investigate the empirical evidence of 43 studies in information systems research between 2006 and 2014. The findings suggested that trust and risk both had significant effects on individual behavior toward SMPs but that trust had a stronger effect. Moderating effects of trust objects (community members vs. platforms) and platform types (virtual communities vs. social networking sites) were found. Surprisingly, culture was found to exert no moderating effect. This paper contributes more generalized knowledge to social media research literature to the theory with regard to the influence of trust and risk on individual behavior toward SMPs. The knowledge serves as the foundation for future research efforts in social media. Implications for practice are discussed.

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