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  • 1.
    Andersen, Lisa M. J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Manouilenko, Irina
    Nylander, Lena
    Edgar, Johan
    Ritvo, Riva Ariella
    Ritvo, Edward
    Bejerot, Susanne
    The Swedish Version of the Ritvo Autism and Asperger Diagnostic Scale: Revised (RAADS-R): A Validation Study of a Rating Scale for Adults2011In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 41, no 12, p. 1635-1645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a paucity of diagnostic instruments for adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study evaluates the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the Ritvo Autism and Asperger Diagnostic Scale-Revised (RAADS-R), an 80-item self-rating scale designed to assist clinicians diagnosing ASD in adults. It was administered to 75 adults with ASD and 197 comparison cases. Also, a subset completed the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ). Three out of four subscales had high internal consistency. Sensitivity was 91% and specificity was 93%. The ASD subjects had significantly higher mean scores on all subscales. ASD females had higher scores than ASD males on the sensory motor subscale, a dimension not included in the AQ. RAADS-R showed promising test re-test reliability.

  • 2. Andersson Konke, Linn
    et al.
    Forslund, Tommie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Nilsson-Jobs, Elisabeth
    Nyström, Pär
    Falck-Ytter, Terje
    Brocki, Karin
    How Does Temperament in Toddlers at Elevated Likelihood for Autism Relate to Symptoms of Autism and ADHD at Three Years of Age?2022In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 52, p. 995-1006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study investigated longitudinal associations between parent-rated temperament, observed exuberance and accelerometer activity level at 18-months and symptoms of ASD and ADHD at 36-months in a sample of 54 children at elevated likelihood for ASD. For the specific parent-rated temperament scales, most observed significant associations appeared to be specific for either ASD or ADHD symptoms. Indeed, by controlling for overlapping symptoms a different pattern of associations emerged. These results illustrate how temperamental measures may signal risk for later ASD versus ADHD symptomatology in infants at elevated likelihood for ASD. In addition, they indicate the potential of adopting a broader view on neurodevelopmental disorders by investigating not only ASD traits, but also co-occurring disorders such as ADHD in samples of elevated likelihood for ASD.

  • 3.
    Bejnö, Hampus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Bölte, Sven
    Linder, Nina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Långh, Ulrika
    Odom, Samuel L
    Roll-Pettersson, Lise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    From Someone Who May Cause Trouble to Someone You Can Play With: Stakeholders' Perspectives on Preschool Program Quality for Autistic Children2022In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 52, no 9, p. 3890-3908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, young autistic children typically attend community-based preschool programs, which may not be adapted to their needs. In the current study, stakeholders to autistic children receiving Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention were interviewed following a quasi-randomized study (#NCT03634761) aimed at improving the preschool program quality using the Swedish version of the Autism Program Environment Rating Scale (APERS). Stakeholders provided their perceptions and experiences concerning key factors for high quality preschool programs as well as well as their experiences of the abovementioned APERS study. Applying thematic analysis, stakeholder groups differed in what they emphasized, but all highlighted staff’s competence, children’s inclusion and participation, collaboration, and the learning environment as key program areas that had been positively influenced by the APERS-based intervention.

  • 4.
    Bejnö, Hampus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Roll-Pettersson, Lise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Klintwall, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Långh, Ulrika
    Odom, Samuel L.
    Bölte, Sven
    Cross-Cultural Content Validity of the Autism Program Environment Rating Scale in Sweden2019In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 49, no 5, p. 1853-1862Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing rates of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and younger age at diagnosis pose a challenge to preschool intervention systems. In Sweden, most young autistic children receive intervention service in community-based preschool programs, but no tool is yet available to assess the quality of the preschool learning environment. This study adapted the Autism Program Environment Rating Scale Preschool/Elementary to Swedish community context (APERS-P-SE). Following translation and a multistep modification process, independent experts rated the content validity of the adaptation. Findings indicate high cross-cultural validity of the adapted APERS-P-SE. The cultural adaption process of the APERS-P-SE highlights similarities and differences between the American and Swedish preschool systems and their impact on early ASD intervention.

  • 5.
    de Verdier, Kim
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education. National Agency for Special Needs Education and Schools, Sweden.
    Fernell, Elisabeth
    Ek, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Blindness and Autism: Parents’ Perspectives on Diagnostic Challenges, Support Needs and Support Provision2020In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 1921-1930Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD), with or without intellectual disability (ID), is common in children with congenital blindness. This complex combination of disabilities often involves many challenges for the family. This study explored parents’ experiences of having a child with blindness and ASD (with or without ID), their support needs and experiences of the support provided. Interviews with eight parents, representing six families, were performed. The parents emphasized that assessment and diagnostic procedures must be performed by professionals with expertise in blind children’s development, and ASD. The support was often perceived as fragmented and did not correspond to the families’ needs. The results suggest that national guidelines should be produced, to ensure a more coordinated and tailored support to these families.

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  • 6.
    de Verdier, Kim
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education. National Agency for Special Needs Education and Schools, Sweden.
    Fernell, Elisabeth
    Ek, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Challenges and Successful Pedagogical Strategies: Experiences from Six Swedish Students with Blindness and Autism in Different School Settings2018In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 520-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of autism in children with blindness is much higher than in the general population. There are many challenges regarding the school situation for children with this complex dual disability. This study explored challenges and successful strategies in school for a sample of six Swedish children with blindness and autism, with and without intellectual disability, through qualitative interviews with students, teachers and parents. All students displayed executive functioning deficits, and the teaching situation entailed several challenges. Our research points to the importance of adopting evidence-based practices for ASD, but adapted according to the students lack of vision. For this to be possible, close collaboration between teachers, parents and specialists in the field of visual impairment and autism is necessary.

  • 7. Hedvall, Åsa
    et al.
    Westerlund, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fernell, Elisabeth
    Norrelgen, Fritjof
    Kjellmer, Liselotte
    Barnevik Olsson, Martina
    Höglund Carlsson, Lotta
    Eriksson, Mats A.
    Billstedt, Eva
    Gillberg, Christopher
    Preschoolers with Autism Spectrum Disorder Followed for 2 Years: Those Who Gained and Those Who Lost the Most in Terms of Adaptive Functioning Outcome2015In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 45, no 11, p. 3624-3633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical predictors of 2-year outcome in preschoolers with ASD were studied in a population-based group of very young children with ASD (n = 208). Children who gained the most (n = 30) and lost the most (n = 23), i.e., increased or decreased their adaptive functioning outcome according to the Vineland Composite Score between study entry (T1) and follow-up (T2), 2 years later were compared. Individual factors that differed significantly between the two outcome groups were cognitive level, age at referral, not passing expected milestones at 18 months, autistic type behavior problems and regression. However, logistic regression analysis showed that only cognitive level at T1 (dichotomized into IQ < 70 and IQ a parts per thousand yen 70) made a unique statistically significant contribution to outcome prediction (p = <.001) with an odds ratio of 18.01. The findings have significant clinical implications in terms of information at diagnosis regarding clinical prognosis in ASD.

  • 8. Hesselmark, Eva
    et al.
    Eriksson, Jonna M.
    Westerlund, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bejerot, Susanne
    Autism Spectrum Disorders and Self-reports: Testing Validity and Reliability Using the NEO-PI-R2015In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 1156-1166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although self-reported measures are frequently used to assess adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), the validity of self-reports is under-researched in ASD. The core symptoms of ASD may negatively affect the psychometric properties of self-reported measures. The aim of the present study was to test the validity and reliability of self-reported data using the NEO personality inventory-revised (NEO-PI-R). Forty-eight adults with ASD and 53 controls completed the NEO-PI-R and a psychiatric interview. Results indicate satisfactory internal consistency of the NEO-PI-R, a satisfactory factor structure, predicted correlations with clinician ratings in the ASD group, and predicted differences in personality between the ASD group and controls. In conclusion, the present results support the use of self-reported measures when assessing adults with ASD .

  • 9. Olsson, M. Barnevik
    et al.
    Lundström, S.
    Westerlund, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Cognitive psychology. Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Giacobini, M. B.
    Gillberg, C.
    Fernell, E.
    Preschool to School in Autism: Neuropsychiatric Problems 8 Years After Diagnosis at 3 Years of Age2016In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 46, no 8, p. 2749-2755Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study presents neuropsychiatric profiles of children aged 11 with autism spectrum disorder, assessed before 4.5 years, and after interventions. The original group comprised a community sample of 208 children with ASD. Parents of 128 participated-34 with average intellectual function, 36 with borderline intellectual function and 58 with intellectual disability. They were interviewed using the Autism-Tics, AD/HD and other Comorbidities interview. Criteria for a clinical/subclinical proxy of ASD were met by 71, 89 and 95 %, respectively. Criteria for at least one of ASD, AD/HD, Learning disorder or Developmental Coordination Disorder were met by 82, 94 and 97 %. More than 90 % of children with a preschool diagnosis of ASD have remaining neuropsychiatric problems at 11, despite early intervention.

  • 10.
    Zakirova Engstrand, Rano
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Roll-Pettersson, Lise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Andersson, Kristina
    Larsson, Helena
    Allodi Westling, Mara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Hirvikoski, Tatja
    Group Psychoeducational Intervention for Grandparents of Young Children with ASD: An Open Feasibility Study2023In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 808-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This initial open feasibility trial reports on feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of the manualized, group-based psychoeducationalintervention for grandparents of preschool-aged children with ASD provided by the outpatient habilitation servicesin Stockholm, Sweden. One hundred and twenty non-custodial grandparents participated in a 6-h intervention program. Thestudy demonstrated good feasibility: 114 (95%) grandparents completed both pre- and post-intervention measures and evaluationsand reported high intervention acceptability. The results also indicated that grandparents increased their knowledgeabout ASD from pre-intervention to post-intervention, gained skills about strategies of supporting their grandchildren andadult children, and appreciated the opportunity to meet and share experiences with other grandparents. Follow-up with arandomized controlled trial design is needed to firmly establish efficacy of this intervention.

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  • 11.
    Zakirova Engstrand, Rano
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Roll-Pettersson, Lise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Westling Allodi, Mara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Hirvikoski, Tatja
    Needs of Grandparents of Preschool-Aged Children with ASD in Sweden2020In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 1941-1957Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about needs of grandparents of young children with autism in family and community settings. This study investigated perceived needs of grandparents of preschool-aged children diagnosed with ASD in the cultural context of Sweden. Participants were 120 grandparents of children enrolled into autism intervention programs provided by the public disability services in Stockholm. The Grandparents’ Needs Survey and the SDQ Impact supplement were used to collect data. Grandparents expressed most needs in topic areas of information and childcare. No significant relations were found between grandparents’ demographics and perceptions of needs; grandparents’ needs were predicted by their perceived burden. The findings provide insight into understanding of grandparents’ needs essential for planning and provision of quality family-centered early intervention services.

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    fulltext
1 - 11 of 11
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