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  • 1.
    Aronsson, Hanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Lind, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Ghirlanda, Stefano
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Enquist, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Parental influences on sexual preferences: The case of attraction to smoking2011In: Journal of Evolutionary Psychology, ISSN 0737-4828, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 21-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated whether a sexual preference for smoking can be related to past experiences of parental smoking during childhood, as predicted by the theory of sexual imprinting, but also by sexual conditioning theory. In a sample of over 4000 respondents to five Internet surveys on sexual preferences, we found that parental smoking correlates with increased attraction to smoking in self-reported hetero- and homosexual males. Maternal smoking was associated with an increase in attraction to smoking both in hetero- and homosexual males, while paternal smoking was associated with an increase in attraction to smoking only in males who prefer male partners. We could not explain these findings by considering other factors than parental smoking habits, such as possibly biased reporting, indicators of a sexually liberal lifestyle or phenotype matching. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that sexual preferences are acquired early in life by exposure to stimuli provided by individuals in the child’s environment, such as caregivers. The sex specificity of the parental effect is consistent with sexual imprinting theory but not with conditioning theory.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Kimmo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Coultas, Julie
    University of Sussex.
    Are people really conformist-biased?: An empirical test and a new mathematical model2009In: Journal of Evolutionary Psychology, ISSN 0737-4828, Journal of Evolutionary Psychology, ISSN 1789-2082, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 5-21Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Eriksson, Kimmo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Strimling, Pontus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Biases for acquiring information individually rather than socially2009In: Journal of Evolutionary Psychology, ISSN 0737-4828, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 309-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We discuss theoretical and empirical arguments for a human bias to acquire information individually rather than socially. In particular, we argue that when other people can be observed, information collection is a public good and hence some of the individual variation in the choice between individual and social learning can be explained by variation in social value orientation. We conducted two experimental studies, based on the game Explore & Collect, to test the predictions that (1) socially and individually acquired information of equal objective value are treated differently, and (2) prosocial subjects tend to spend more effort than selfish subjects on individual acquiring of information. Both predictions were supported.

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