Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Dalkvist, Jan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Montgomery, William
    Montgomery, Henry
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Westerlund, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Reanalyses of group telepathy data with a focus on variability2010In: Journal of parapsychology, ISSN 0022-3387, Vol. 74, no 1, p. 143-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reanalyses of data from experiments on telepathic communication of emotions, as evoked by slide pictures, between groups of senders and groups of receivers are reported. In the present study, variability in performance rather than level of performance was in focus. Fits between variability in distributions of hits expected by chance and variability in empirical distributions were explored. The expected distributions were derived by means of the hypergeometric distribution, which provides the number of successes in a sequence of n draws from a finite population without replacement. Session level analyses showed that the variability in hit-rate was smaller than that expected by chance, particularly when the session groups who started as senders and those who started as receivers were analyzed separately and when the geomagnetic activity was low. Monte Carlo analyses indicated that these results could not be explained by stacking effects. Individual level analyses did not show any effects. In a second part of the study, the variability of responses to the individual target pictures was explored. The variability differed significantly among the pictures. Simulation showed that this effect was not attributable to stacking effects. Two predictions to be tested in an ongoing replication experiment are presented.

  • 2. Dalkvist, Jan
    et al.
    Mossbridge, J.
    Westerlund, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    How to remove the influence of expectation bias in presentiment and similar experiments: a recommended strategy2014In: Journal of parapsychology, ISSN 0022-3387, Vol. 78, no 1, p. 80-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we reconsider expectation bias in so-called presentiment experiments, with focus on how to handle it. In such experiments, presentiment is usually thought to be demonstrated by showing that significant physiological differences precede stimuli presumed to give rise to different arousal levels. Often these differences suggest that physiological arousal is more likely to precede arousing rather than calming stimuli. Conceivably, however, such reactions can be explained as resulting from expectation bias of the gambler’s fallacy type. This bias is based on the (false) notion that the likelihood of an arousing stimulus being presented grows as the number of consecutive calming stimuli increases. Different ways of controlling or avoiding the bias are discussed. Our resulting recommendation is to use analysis of variance (ANOVA) to separate the effect of the bias from the hypothetical presentiment effect, preferably at the trial-by-trial level. We also recommend applying ANOVA to each participant separately and using a “counting” method to test for possible presentiment effects at the group level. Application of ANOVA is illustrated using a simulated example. We anticipate ANOVA can handle not only the gambler’s fallacy bias but also similar biases, in presentiment experiments as well as in some conscious precognition experiments.

  • 3.
    Westerlund, Joakim
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Parker, Adrian
    Dalkvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hadlaczky, Gergö
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Remarkable correspondences between ganzfeld mentation and target content - a psychical or psychological effect?2006In: Journal of parapsychology, ISSN 0022-3387, Vol. 70, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remarkable correspondences between ganzfeld mentation and target content have been reported since the start of ganzfeld experiments in parapsychology. These correspondences may be due either to some form of anomalous information transfer (e.g., telepathy) or to a cognitive illusion on the part of the perceiver. This paper presents 4 studies conducted in order to investigate which of these two possibilities is the more probable. In Study 1, an external judge in a ganzfeld experiment selected 20 short segments that showed most remarkable correspondences between ganzfeld mentation and film clip content while being blind to whether the chosen film clip had been used as a target or as a decoy. Only 6 of the segments showed correspondences between the mentation and the target, which is close to chance expectation level. In Study 2, 11 students rated the 6 correspondences that were “hits” as being equally as impressive as the 14 that were “misses.” In Studies 3 and 4, the possibility that the 14 correspondences that were “misses” could have been due to a form of “displacement clairvoyance” was shown to be very unlikely. It was concluded that it is possible to obtain what at least some people consider to be very remarkable correspondences between mentation and film content by chance alone.

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf