Change search
Refine search result
1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Andersson, Lars
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Long-term predictors of loneliness in old age: results of a 20-year national study2018In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 190-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The understanding of social phenomena is enhanced if individuals can be studied over longer periods. Regarding loneliness in old age, there is a general lack of longitudinal research. The aim of this study was to examine whether there is an association between loneliness in old age and social engagement 20years earlier, as stated by life course theory and the convoy model.

    Method: Data from the nationally representative Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (2002 and 2011 data collection waves) and the Swedish Level of Living Survey (1981 and 1991 data collection waves) were used. The sample included 823 individuals with an average age of 62.2years at baseline and 82.4years at follow-up.

    Results: Each form of social engagement in old age was significantly associated with the same form of social engagement 20years earlier. Close forms of social engagement were associated with loneliness in old age; as were more distant forms of social engagement, but only when they were considered solely in old age.

    Conclusion: Patterns of social engagement in old age were established at least 20years earlier and close forms of social engagement are long-term predictors of loneliness, although current social engagement tended to be more influential on loneliness. The study underlines the importance of interventions targeted at close relationships that can provide social support in old age.

  • 2.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Andersson, Lars
    McKee, Kevin J
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Predictors of loneliness among older women and men in Sweden: A national longitudinal study2014In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 409-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Longitudinal research on loneliness in old age has rarely considered loneliness separately for men and women, despite gender differences in life experiences. The objective of this study was to examine the extent to which older women and men (70+) report feelings of loneliness with a focus on: (a) changes in reported loneliness as people age, and (b) which factors predict loneliness. Method: Data from the 2004 and 2011 waves of SWEOLD, a longitudinal national survey, was used (n = 587). The prediction of loneliness in 2011 by variables measured in 2004 and 2004-2011 variable change scores was examined in three logistic regression models: total sample, women and men. Variables in the models included: gender, age, education, mobility problems, depression, widowhood and social contacts. Results: Older people moved into and out of frequent loneliness over time, although there was a general increase in loneliness with age. Loneliness at baseline, depression increment and recent widowhood were significant predictors of loneliness in all three multivariable models. Widowhood, depression, mobility problems and mobility reduction predicted loneliness uniquely in the model for women; while low level of social contacts and social contact reduction predicted loneliness uniquely in the model for men. Conclusion: This study challenges the notion that feelings of loneliness in old age are stable. It also identifies important gender differences in prevalence and predictors of loneliness. Knowledge about such differences is crucial for the development of effective policy and interventions to combat loneliness in later life.

  • 3.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    McKee, Kevin J
    Correlates of social and emotional loneliness in older people: evidence from an English community study.2014In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 504-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Loneliness is an important influence on quality of life in old age and has been conceptualised as consisting of two dimensions, social and emotional. This article describes analyses that sought to produce models of social and emotional loneliness in older people, using demographic, psychological and health, and social variables.

    METHOD: Older people (aged 65+, n=1255) from the Barnsley metropolitan area of the United Kingdom were recruited randomly from within a stratified sampling frame and received a questionnaire-based interview (response rate: 68.1%). The questionnaire contained items and scales on demographic, psychological and health, and social characteristics, and a validated measure of loneliness that assesses both social and emotional loneliness.

    RESULTS: Of the respondents, 7.7% were found to be severely or very severely lonely, while another 38.3% were moderately lonely. Social and emotional loneliness shared 19.36% variance. Being male, being widowed, low well-being, low self-esteem, low-income comfort, low contact with family, low contact with friends, low activity, low perceived community integration, and receipt of community care were significant predictors of social loneliness (R=0.50, R2=0.25, F(18, 979)=18.17, p<0.001). Being widowed, low well-being, low self-esteem, high activity restriction, low-income comfort, and non-receipt of informal care were significant predictors of emotional loneliness (R=0.55, R2=0.30, F (18, 973)=23.00, p<0.001).

    CONCLUSION: This study provides further empirical support for the conceptual separation of emotional and social loneliness. Consequently, policy on loneliness in older people should be directed to developing a range of divergent intervention strategies if both emotional and social loneliness are to be reduced.

  • 4.
    Hamren, Kidist
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Chungkham, Holendro Singh
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Hyde, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Religion, spirituality, social support and quality of life: measurement and predictors CASP-12(v2) amongst older Ethiopians living in Addis Ababa2014In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 610-621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: As African populations begin to age developing accurate measures of quality of life (QoL) in later life for use on the continent is becoming imperative. This study evaluates the measurement and predictors of QoL amongst older Ethiopians. Method: The data come from a multi-stage cluster sample of 214 people aged 55 and over living in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. QoL was measured using the CASP-12(v2). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to test the properties of the scale. The relationships between social support, religiosity/spirituality and socio-demographic factors on QoL were tested with linear regression analyses. Results: The CASP subscales exhibited good internal reliability and the CFA provides reasonable support for an 11-item 4-factor model (CFI, 0.954; RMSEA 0.075). Multivariate regression analyses suggest that both religiousness/spirituality and social support have positive relationships with QoL. Conclusion: Older people in Africa can often be socially isolated, marginalised and in extreme poverty. Yet few studies have looked at QoL more generally and there is no accepted gold standard measurement of QoL. Yet such a development would allow researchers to directly compare QoL and the determinants of QoL amongst older Africans and those elsewhere. The results show that a modified 11-item CASP is a meaningful measure of QoL for use with older Ethiopians. Both religiousness/spirituality and social support are positively associated with QoL and might be important buffers against deprivation.

  • 5. Hedman, Annicka
    et al.
    Nygård, Louise
    Almkvist, Ove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Patterns of functioning in older adults with mild cognitive impairment: a two-year study focusing on everyday technology use2013In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 679-688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Early detection is vital for persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who are at risk of activity and participation limitations, and crosssectional studies suggest the ability to use everyday technology (ET) to be a sensible tool. However, group level analyses fail to inform us about how functioning can vary over time for individuals. This study aimed at exploring and describing patterns of functioning over two years in a sample newly classified with MCI, with a special focus on perceived difficulty in ET use and involvement in everyday activities. In addition, cognitive functioning and conversion to dementia were studied. Method: 37 older adults (aged 55) with MCI were assessed at inclusion, and at 6, 12, and 24 months. Longitudinal case plots for the variables under study were analyzed based on strict criteria using a person-oriented approach. Paired t-tests from baseline and 24 months were also conducted to analyze change. Results: The 32 participants who remained in the study after two years showed three distinct patterns of functioning over time: stable/ascending (n = 10), fluctuating (n = 10), and descending (n = 12), with the highest conversion to dementia in the descending pattern (58%). The perceived ability to use ET decreased or fluctuated in 50% of the sample. However, on a group level, a significant difference between baseline and 24 months was found only regarding cognitive function. Conclusion: As the need for support is individual and likely to alter over time, repeated evaluations of activity involvement and difficulty in ET use are suggested to target timely interventions for persons with MCI.

  • 6.
    Hyde, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Chungkham, Holendro Singh
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    The impact of involuntary exit from employment in later life on the risk of major depression and being prescribed anti-depressant medication2015In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 381-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Involuntary employment exit in later life has been shown to be a risk factor for poor physical and mental health. This study aims to examine the relationship between involuntary employment exit in later life and subsequent risk of reporting major depression or being prescribed anti-depressant medication (ADM). Method: Data were drawn from four waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH). This is a nationally representative longitudinal cohort survey of persons employed in Sweden in 2003 and 2005. The sample was restricted to respondents who had exited the labour market aged 50+ years between 2006 and 2012 (N = 1433). Major depression was measured using the Symptom Checklist Core Depression Scale (SCL-CD6). Prescription ADM redeemed from a pharmacy was based on the National Prescribed Drug Register. Results: After controlling for socio-demographic variables, health, health behaviours, and baseline depression, involuntary employment exit was associated with an increased risk of reporting major depression (OR 3.16; CI 1.32-7.61) and becoming newly prescribed ADM (HR 2.08; CI 1.03-4.21) compared to voluntary employment exit. Conclusion: Involuntary employment exit represents a risk for subsequent depression in later life. Mental health and social services ought to consider identifying these individuals for possible intervention programs to reduce the burden of depression in later life.

  • 7. Möller, Jette
    et al.
    Björkenstam, Emma
    Ljung, Rickard
    Åberg Yngwe, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Widowhood and the risk of psychiatric care, psychotropic medication and all-cause mortality: a cohort study of 658 022 elderly people in Sweden2011In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 259-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To study the effect of widowhood on the risk of psychiatric care, psychotropic medication and mortality, and to study if the effect is modified by educational level. Method: A nationwide, register-based cohort study. All married or widowed individuals aged 75 and older who were alive and registered in Sweden on 31 December 2004 and still registered on 31 December 2005. A total of 658,022 individuals were included in the study and followed in 2006. Odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Results: Loss of spouse increased the risk of outpatient psychiatric visits, psychotropic medication and all-cause mortality. Prescribed psychotropic medication was more common among those newly bereaved, adjusted OR of 1.46 (95% CI 1.41-1.50), compared to those married. For those widowed for a longer period, the corresponding estimate was 1.12 (95% CI 1.11-1.14). The OR for all-cause mortality was 1.18 (95% CI 1.11-1.26). The analyses also indicated different effects on inpatient care depending on educational level. Conclusion: Loss of spouse increases the risk of people getting psychiatric care, both for severe and minor psychiatric conditions. The effect seems to differ depending on educational level. Further studies are needed to disentangle the mechanism behind the effects of each measurement of psychiatric conditions and how these are affected by educational level.

  • 8.
    Nyberg, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Peristera, Paraskevi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Hanson, Linda L. Magnusson
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Socio-economic predictors of depressive symptoms around old age retirement in Swedish women and men2019In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 558-565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To estimate trajectories of depression around old age retirement in Swedish women and men and examine if socio-economic status predicted the trajectoriesMethods: The analytic sample comprised 907 women and 806 men from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health. B-spline smoothers and group-based trajectory modelling were used to identify groups of individuals with similar trajectories of depressive symptoms around retirement. Multinomial regression analyses were conducted to investigate if socio-economic factors were associated with odds of belonging to trajectory groups with higher depression scores.Results: Four depressive symptoms trajectories were identified in both genders, all showing similar symptom levels across the retirement transition. Low levels of depressive symptoms were observed in the three largest groups. In the last trajectory group among women (2.5%) depression scores were moderate to severe and among men (3.3%) depression scores were persistent moderate. Higher educational level and lower subjectively rated social status were associated with higher odds of belonging to trajectory groups with higher levels of depressive symptoms in both genders. Conclusion: Retirement transition was not associated with symptoms of depression. Higher educational level and lower subjective social status may predict higher depressive symptom levels the years around old age retirement.

  • 9.
    Peristera, Paraskevi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Platts, Loretta G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    A comparison of the B-spline group-based trajectory model with the polynomial group-based trajectory model for identifying trajectories of depressive symptoms around old-age retirement2018In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The life event of retirement may be associated with changes in levels of depressive symptoms. The use of polynomial group-based trajectory modelling allows any changes to vary between different groups in a sample. A new approach, estimating these models using B-splines rather than polynomials, may improve modelling of complex changes in depressive symptoms at retirement.

    Methods: The sample contained 1497 participants from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH). Polynomial and B-spline approaches to estimating group-based trajectory models were compared.

    Results: Polynomial group-based trajectory models produced unexpected changes in direction of trajectories unsupported by the data. In contrast, B-splines provided improved insights into trajectory shapes and more homogeneous groups. While retirement was associated with reductions in depressive symptoms in the sample as a whole, the nature of changes at retirement varied between groups.

    Conclusions: Depressive symptoms trajectories around old age retirement changed in complex ways that were modelled more accurately by the use of B-splines. We recommend estimation of group-based trajectory models with B-splines, particularly where abrupt changes might occur. Improved trajectory modelling may support research into risk factors and consequences of major depressive disorder, ultimately assisting with identification of groups which may benefit from treatment.

  • 10.
    Platts, Loretta G.
    et al.
    Imperial College London, UK; ESRC International Centre for Lifecourse Studies in Society and Health (ICLS), UK.
    Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan
    Webb, Elizabeth
    Zins, Marie
    Goldberg, Marcel
    Blane, David
    Wahrendorf, Morten
    Physical occupational exposures during working life and quality of life after labour market exit: results from the GAZEL study2013In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 697-706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate variations in quality of life at older ages, we take a life course perspective to analyse long-term effects of physical working conditions upon quality of life after retirement. In doing so, we study to what extent these associations are explained by individuals' health at older ages.

    METHOD: We use administrative data and self-administered questionnaire responses from the French GAZEL cohort. Quality of life was assessed with CASP-19 in 2009 and related to three types of physical working conditions during previous working life: (1) ergonomic strain, (2) physical danger and (3) exposures to chemicals. Health was assessed in 2007 with the SF-36 Health Survey. Multiple regressions were calculated in retired men only, controlling for important confounders including social position.

    RESULTS: In contrast to men, few women were exposed to strenuous and dangerous working conditions in this cohort and were not included in subsequent analyses. Negative effects on retired men's quality of life were found for the physical occupational exposures of ergonomic strain and physical danger, but not for chemical exposures. Effects were attenuated after the introduction of physical and mental health to the models, indicating an indirect effect of physical working conditions upon quality of life via health.

    CONCLUSION: Adverse physical working conditions have long-term consequences for health and quality of life at older ages. Improvements to physical working conditions may improve individuals' quality of life over the long term.

  • 11.
    Platts, Loretta G.
    et al.
    King's College London, UK; Imperial College London, UK.
    Webb, Elizabeth
    Zins, Marie
    Goldberg, Marcel
    Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan
    Mid-life occupational grade and quality of life following retirement: a 16-year follow-up of the French GAZEL study2015In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 634-646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This article aims to contribute to the literature on life course influences upon quality of life by examining pathways linking social position in middle age to quality of life following retirement in French men and women. Method: Data are from the GAZEL cohort study of employees at the French national gas and electricity company. A finely grained measure of occupational grade in 1989 was obtained from company records. Annual self-completion questionnaires provided information on quality of life in 2005, measured with the CASP-19 scale, and on participants' recent circumstances 2002-2005: mental health, physical functioning, wealth, social status, neighbourhood characteristics, social support and social participation. Path analysis using full information maximum likelihood estimation was performed on 11,293 retired participants. Results: Higher occupational grade in 1989 was associated, in a graded relationship, with better quality of life 16 years later. This association was accounted for by individuals' more recent circumstances, particularly their social status, mental health, physical functioning and wealth. Conclusion: The graded relationship between occupational grade in mid-life and quality of life after labour market exit was largely accounted for by more recent socio-economic circumstances and state of health. The results support a pathway model for the development of social disparities in quality of life, in which earlier social position shapes individual circumstances in later life.

  • 12. Tuvesson, Hanna
    et al.
    Hellström, A.
    Sjöberg, Linnea
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Sjölund, B. -M.
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordell, E.
    Fagerström, C.
    Life weariness and suicidal thoughts in late life: a national study in Sweden2018In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 1365-1371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This study aimed at investigating the point prevalence of life weariness and suicidal thoughts and their relationship with socio-demographic characteristics in a population of older adults in Sweden.Method: Data from 7913 individuals aged 60years and older were drawn from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care, a collaborative study in Sweden. Life weariness and suicidal thoughts were measured by one item derived from the Montgomery-angstrom sberg Depression Rating Scale. A multinomial regression model was used to investigate the relationships of socio-demographic characteristics with life weariness and suicidal thoughts.Results: Living in urban and semi-urban areas, being of advanced age, being divorced and having lower educational levels were related to life weariness. Living in a residential care facility, being widowed or unmarried, being born in a non-Nordic European country and experiencing financial difficulties were related to both life weariness and suicidal thoughts. Sex was found to be unrelated to either life weariness or suicidal thoughts.Conclusion: This study found that several socio-demographic variables were associated with life weariness and suicidal thoughts among older adults. Specific attention to older individuals with these characteristics may be warranted as they might be more vulnerable to life weariness and suicidal thoughts.

1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf