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  • 1.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Play at work: Contested frames of hacking2001In: Focaal: European Journal of Anthropology, ISSN 0920-1297, E-ISSN 1558-5263, Vol. 37, p. 89-101Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Høyer Leivestad, Hege
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. London School of Economics and Political Science, UK.
    Who cares about the cargo? Container economies in a European transshipment port2021In: Focaal: European Journal of Anthropology, ISSN 0920-1297, E-ISSN 1558-5263, no 89, p. 52-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the shipping container has been hyped as the most potent symbol of global trade, it is simultaneously a unit of measure, a medium of exchange, and a material abstraction of heterogeneous use value. This article places the container and its anonymized cargo as part of the everyday logistics of commodity circulation in the Spanish Port of Algeciras Bay-a transshipment hub at the Strait of Gibraltar. By disentangling the shipping container's multiple repertoires, this article focuses on how the shipping container transforms and converts the value of cargo and mediates logistics labor in the port.

  • 3.
    Høyer Leivestad, Hege
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. London School of Economics and Political Science, UK.
    Markkula, Johanna
    Inside container economies2021In: Focaal: European Journal of Anthropology, ISSN 0920-1297, E-ISSN 1558-5263, no 89, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This introduction proposes an anthropology of global cargo circulation by placing the maritime shipping industry at the center of global capitalism. With container economies we refer to the maritime global circulation of cargo that is sustained by an undervalued labor force, dependent upon unstable logistics infrastructures and driven by speculative capital. Container economies, we argue, are produced by adding, moving, and destroying value through the maritime supply chain. In this introduction, we reflect upon the implications of containerization and its wider consequences for logistics labor. We argue that maritime logistics and labor is best understood by taking into account their wider networks of dependency expressed through kinship relations, ethnicity and coexisting regimes of value.

  • 4.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The social life of categories: affirmative action and trajectories of the indigenous2013In: Focaal: European Journal of Anthropology, ISSN 0920-1297, E-ISSN 1558-5263, Vol. 2013, no 65, p. 33-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I examine the ways in which the term “indigenous peoples“ is reworked in a specific South Asian context. I focus on the new, hybrid category of “indigenous tribe“ in the Indian state of Meghalaya. I argue that we can think of the indigenous tribe category as a strategic conflation of two different regimes of rights or political assertions. The first relates to the existing nation-state framework for affirmative action as expressed in the Scheduled Tribe (ST) status, while the second relates to the emerging global framework for asserting the rights of indigenous peoples. While the benefits of asserting the status of indigenous tribes is obvious, for example, preventing other, nonindigenous tribes from owning land in the state, the long-term gains seems more doubtful. Both affirmative action programs and indigenous peoples frameworks are motivated by a moral imperative to redress historical injustices and contemporary social inequalities. To evoke them for other ends might eventually backfire. The larger point I seek to make, however, is that political categories tend to take on a life of their own, escaping their intended purposes and hence applied by people in novel and surprising ways.

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