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  • 1.
    Fredengren, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Becoming Bog Bodies: Sacrifice and Politics of Exclusion, as Evidenced in the Deposition of Skeletal Remains in Wetlands Near Uppåkra2018In: Journal of Wetland Archaeology, ISSN 1473-2971, E-ISSN 2051-6231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is inspired by new materialist gender theory and the way it reconfigures the analysis of bodies and the environment. Here the relationships entangled in wetlands and bogs through depositions are in focus. More specifically, it deals with the placing of bodily remains and artefacts in wet contexts around the political and religious centre of Uppåkra in Scania, South Sweden. The aim of this paper is to map some of the processes that led to those people ‘becoming bog bodies’ and investigates their role in a situated political ecology. By examining who these people were and became during the life course and in death, it will open up a discussion on precariousness, vulnerability and masculinity, where victims of sacrifice were perhaps not only selected, but also possibly made. The paper brings a neglected dataset of skeletal remains from bogs to the attention of research and present new radiocarbon dates as well as osteological analysis of these remains. It engages with concepts such as slow violence and necropolitics derived from discussions within the environmental humanities.

  • 2.
    Fredengren, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Löfqvist, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Food for Thor: The Deposition of Human and Animal Remains in a Swedish Wetland2015In: Journal of Wetland Archaeology, ISSN 1473-2971, E-ISSN 2051-6231, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 122-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper publishes an assemblage of human- and animal remains from Torresta, a wetland site in Uppland, mid-Sweden, dating to the Bronze- and Early Iron Ages. The location of this material suggests that the phenomena of depositing bodies in watery places occurred much further north than has formerly been accounted for. It is argued that the understanding of such depositions may gain by a move from an anthropocentric focus to include relationships between humans, animals and landscape. In particular, the study makes an effort to explore whether the remains of human and animal bodies were parts of networks of care or neglect and how they could have worked in a more-than-human landscape. The paper suggests that these depositions could have operated as religious materiality and unfolds cross-temporal links with the landscape, as the depositions are located at a rock-art site by a fording point, which may have been of multi-species importance. In this place a variety of materialities from the past have formatted and attracted later depositional action. The paper works with a feminist posthuman, relational notion of landscape that experiments with the boundaries between nature and culture and between different times in a place where depositions and bodily movement of humans and animals interlace with geological forces such as land-rise and corresponding water-retreat. Thereby the paper experiments with an altered approach to landscape, accounting for landscape as changing sets of relations, which is more than landscape as captured in the eye of a human beholder or captured in meaning-making processes.

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