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  • 1.
    Adami, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    A Narratable Self as Addressed by Human Rights2017In: Policy Futures in Education, ISSN 1478-2103, E-ISSN 1478-2103, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 252-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper extends the critique in earlier research of human rights as exclusive of otherness and difference by introducing the work of Adriana Cavarero (2000) on a narratable self. Hence, the formation of human rights is thus about the relations between different narratable selves, not just Western ones. A narrative learning, drawing on Cavarero (2000), shifts the focus in human rights learning from learning about the other to exposing one’s life story narrative through relationality.

  • 2.
    Aronsson, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Reconsidering the concept of difference: A proposal to connect education and neuroscience in new ways2019In: Policy Futures in Education, ISSN 1478-2103, E-ISSN 1478-2103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Connecting neuroscience and education is a desire in contemporary society, related to the recur- ring calls for education to become more evidence-based. Research in educational neuroscience strives towards such interdisciplinary knowledge production and to an enhanced interaction between neuroscience research and educational practice. However, various problems and difficul- ties in achieving these collaborations are often reported. Discrepancies, hierarchies, misconcep- tions and communication problems can be described as creating a ‘discourse of difficulty’. The aim of this paper is to trace the specific difficulties that have created this discourse, and to problematize these difficulties in ways that enable new conceptions of what might be entailed by interaction and mutual knowledge development between the fields of neuroscience and education, and between academic theory and educational practice. The most significant difficulty is caused by a binary understanding of the concept of difference in relation to understanding the fields. Instead of understanding the fields in opposition to each other, I will suggest an understanding that implies difference emerging in each of the collaborating fields as the self-differing effects of the encounter. In the concluding discussion, I will argue that an understanding of the concept of difference as a process of mutual transformation can be essential for reciprocity and bi-directionality in collabo- rations. Instead of producing contradictions and hierarchies between scientific fields and between theory and practice, such an understanding of difference might facilitate an investigation of the polarizations that always position something as of lesser value, and ultimately, creates the gaps that collaborations want to bridge.

  • 3.
    Bengtsson, Anki
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Educating European Citizenship: Elucidating assumptions about teaching civic competence2015In: Policy Futures in Education, ISSN 1478-2103, E-ISSN 1478-2103, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 788-800Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, the idea of the contribution of education to citizenship has been reinitiated. The purpose of this paper is to investigate constructions of citizenship as they are articulated in European policy documents on teacher education. It is indicated that the normative form of active citizenship is put into play through the individual and her or his actions, which is centred on learning. Drawing on Foucault’s analytic approach to problematization and Foucauldian methods of analysing policy problematizations of a certain problem, this study draws attention to the discourse of active citizenship and technologies of accountability that are utilized to shape teaching civic learning. It is suggested that citizenship is constructed as a learning problem, which motivates young people in school to reflect on their skills and competences. It is also from these capacities that their attitudes towards cultural diversity are assumed to be developed. Thus, in the formation of citizenship, emphasis is laid on the individual’s capacity for learning, which is also mobilized in narratives of the construction of Europe.

  • 4.
    Bengtsson, Anki
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    European Policy of Career Guidance: The interrelationship between career self-management and production of human capital in the knowledge economy2011In: Policy Futures in Education, ISSN 1478-2103, E-ISSN 1478-2103, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 616-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘Everyone has a career to be managed’ is the simple message in new policy strategies forcareer guidance in Europe. In this article, the promotion of career management for ‘all’ will be unsettled by analysis of career self-management put in relation to rationalities of government and selfgovernment. We are governed to self-manage our career and at the same time govern ourselves to do that. European policy documents on career guidance and career development produced from 2000 to 2008 are analysed from the Foucauldian governmentality perspective. From the starting point that reshaping of career guidance is part of human capital strategies in the knowledge economy of Europe, the author argues that policy of career guidance aims to shape not only a competitive workforce, but in addition entrepreneurial and responsible citizens. In political strategies of career guidance, the competences of career management skills work as a technology to govern the individual to participate in inventing human capital by capitalising oneself to manage the career in working life as well as in social life. The author discusses what desirable subjectivities government of career self-management constructs in relation to re-regulated responsibility of the individual and the state.

  • 5. Gruber, Sabine
    et al.
    Rabo, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Multiculturalism Swedish style: shifts and sediments in educational policies and textbooks2014In: Policy Futures in Education, ISSN 1478-2103, E-ISSN 1478-2103, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 56-66Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Scheja, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Exploring potentialities for cosmopolitan learning in Swedish teacher education.2015In: Policy Futures in Education, ISSN 1478-2103, E-ISSN 1478-2103, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 775-787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to explore student teachers’ experiences of learning in teacher education, with a focus on how students describe their ways of thinking about their own learning in relation to their future professional role as teachers and how these descriptions relate to emerging cosmopolitan visions for student learning in teacher education. Data were collected through qualitative interviews with a small sample of student teachers at two Swedish universities. Thirty student teachers writing their final exam papers were invited to participate in an interview. Of these, 14 volunteered for audio-recorded, individual interviews exploring the students’ experiences of studying and learning. The analysis drew on a conceptual framework developed in research on students’ approaches to studying and learning and focused on how students described their experiences of learning in the course of studying, with an emphasis on the ways in which students reflected on their own emergent understandings of knowledge that they believe to be central to the process of becoming a professional teacher. These reflective accounts were subsequently analysed with a focus on the ways in which they connect to current philosophical ideas of cosmopolitan learning in teacher education. While the student teachers did not explicitly link their own understandings of what is involved in becoming a teacher to any cosmopolitan views raised in their teacher education, their ways of thinking about their own emergent professional understanding of teaching revealed a certain reflexive potential that can be linked to ideas of cosmopolitan learning in teacher education. This study contributes to educational research by linking an empirically derived conceptualisation of student learning in higher education to broader philosophical visions of higher education specifically addressing the challenges that teacher education faces in the light of the globalisation of society as a whole.

  • 7.
    Westling Allodi, Mara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Simple-Minded Accountability Measures Create Failing Schools in Disadvantaged Contexts: A Case Study of a Swedish Junior High School2013In: Policy Futures in Education, ISSN 1478-2103, E-ISSN 1478-2103, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 331-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The principles of new public management – market mechanisms, accountability and standards – have been applied in the education system. These methods are supposed to increase efficiency, but there is also a risk of negative consequences from the services provided if the measures of performance target a reduced range of goals, ignore relevant variables or are not valid measures. Indicators used to compare schools’ performance are aggregate measures, such as the percentage of students who have access to secondary education and the average qualification value. This study reports how accountability policy and procedures may affect the functioning of the education system through the case study of a school serving a diverse student population. The school organisation was influenced by measures of performance, external events and contextual and selection variables. The average qualification value measure seems to be a limited measure of performance at the school level, since it largely reflects school composition and school segregation. Even the available performance measures adjusted for background variables do not take account of relevant variables that may influence the school’s need of resources and its results, such as students’ language proficiency and special educational needs. Other performances that are not easily measured – such as the prevention of dropout, improvement of school attendance and provision of an equitable education for all students – are disregarded. Schools serving those students with the most needs risk being penalised by an approximate and restricted range of accountability systems because there is a risk that the schools will appear to be failing when they are working with more complex and advanced tasks than average schools. Based on these inaccurate performance measurements, the school may be targeted with wide-ranging, severe and basically unjust interventions.

1 - 7 of 7
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