Change search
Refine search result
1 - 23 of 23
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Buerki, S
    et al.
    Forest, F
    Acevedo-Rodríguez, P
    Callmander, M. W.
    Nylander, Johan
    Stockholm University. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    Harrington, M
    Sanmartín, I
    Küpfer, P
    Alvarez, N
    Plastid and nuclear DNA markers reveal intricate relationships at subfamilial and tribal levels in the soapberry family (Sapindaceae)2009In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 51, p. 238-258Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Envall, Ida
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Källersjö, Mari
    Erséus, Christer
    University of Gothenburg.
    Molecular evidence for the non-monophyletic status of Naidinae (Annelida, Clitellata, Tubificidae)2006In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 570-584Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Naidinae (former Naididae) is a group of small aquatic clitellate annelids, common worldwide. In this study, we evaluated the phylogenetic status of Naidinae, and examined the phylogenetic relationships within the group. Sequence data from two mitochondrial genes (12S rDNA and 16S rDNA), and one nuclear gene (18S rDNA), were used. Sequences were obtained from 27 naidine species, 24 species from the other tubificid subfamilies, and five outgroup taxa. New sequences (in all 108) as well as GenBank data were used. The data were analysed by parsimony and Bayesian inference. The tree topologies emanating from the different analyses are congruent to a great extent. Naidinae is not found to be monophyletic. The naidine genus Pristina appears to be a derived group within a clade consisting of several genera (Ainudrilus, Epirodrilus, Monopylephorus, and Rhyacodrilus) from another tubificid subfamily, Rhyacodrilinae. These results demonstrate the need for a taxonomic revision: either Ainudrilus, Epirodrilus, Monopylephorus, and Rhyacodrilus should be included within Naidinae, or Pristina should be excluded from this subfamily. Monophyly of four out of six naidine genera represented by more than one species is supported: Chaetogaster, Dero, Paranais, and Pristina, respectively

  • 3. Erseus, Christer
    et al.
    Envall, Ida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    De Wit, Pierre
    Gustaysson, Lena M.
    Molecular data reveal a tropical freshwater origin of Naidinae (Annelida, Clitellata, Naididae)2017In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 115, p. 115-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phylogenetic relationships within Naidinae (Annelida, Clitellata, Naididae) were investigated, using six molecular markers, both mitochondrial (12S rDNA, 16S rDNA, the COI gene) and nuclear (18S rDNA, 28S rDNA, the ITS region). Thirty-seven nominal species, representing 16 of the 22 genera recognized in the subfamily, were included, and the Nais conmmmunis/variabilis species complex was represented by six different morphotypes. Ten other species of Naididae were selected as outgroups. The data were analysed by Bayesian inference and Maximum Likelihood. The phylogeny corroborates monophyly of the Naidinae, and the separate status of the genus Pristina (Pristininae) and the Opistocystinae. Relationships within Naidinae are largely well supported, but in some parts unexpected: (1) A Glade containing the largely tropical genera Dero and Branchiodrilus is sister to the rest of the subfamily, and together with a third tropical genus, Allonais, they form a basal paraphyly. All these genera show morphological adaptations to environmental hypoxia, leading to the conclusion that Naidinae originated in tropical freshwaters. (2) The genera Dero, Nais and Piguetiella are paraphyletic. (3) At least Branchiodrilus, Paranais, Chaetogaster, Nais, Stylaria appear to contain cryptic species. Morphological characters, especially those associated with chaetae, are to a great extent homoplastic within Naidinae, which certainly has contributed to the overall taxonomic confusion of this subfamily.

  • 4.
    Erséus, Christer
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Envall, Ida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Marchese, Mercedes
    Instituto Nacional de Limnología (CONICET-UNL), Ciudad Universitaria, Santa Fe, Argentina.
    Gustavsson, Lena M.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    The systematic position of Opistocystidae (Annelida, Clitellata) revealed by DNA data2010In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 309-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Opistocystidae Cernosvitov, 1936 is a largely Neotropical oligochaete taxon containing seven species. its familial status has never been formally challenged, although possible close relationships with Naididae and Phreodrilidae have been noted. Mitochondrial 12S and 16S rDNA, and nuclear 18S rDNA, of a range of aquatic oligochaete taxa, including Trieminentia corderoi (Opistocystidae), were analysed by Bayesian inference. This showed that T. corderoi is a derived lineage within Naididae, closely related to Pristina and its monotypic subfamily Pristininae. Opistocystidae as a whole (with its three genera, Opistocysta, Trieminentia, and Crustipellis) is thus likely to be a group within Naididae.

  • 5.
    Espeland, Marianne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Systematic Zoology.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    Entomology Department, Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    Hovmöller, Rasmus
    Entomology Department, Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    Early Xanthochorema (Trichoptera, Insecta) radiations in New Caledonia originated on ultrabasic rocks.2008In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 904-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The toxic and nutrient poor ultrabasic rock substrate covering one-third of New Caledonia greatly influenced on the biogeography and diversity of plants in the island. Studies on the effect of ultrabasic substrate on fauna are almost entirely absent. In this paper we examine whether the diversification of Trichoptera of the New Caledonian endemic genus Xanthochorema Kimmins, 1953 was related to the presence of ultrabasic substrate. The analysis is based on data from a phylogeny derived from DNA sequences of mitochondrial COX1, COX2 and 16S, and nuclear EF1a genes. The study of the relationships between ancestral species and substrate was carried out using dispersal-vicariance analysis and tracing the history of substrate association with ultrabasic and non-ultrabasic distributions representing the terminals in the fully resolved phylogenetic tree. Our results show that (1) the ancestor of all Xanthochorema species was present on ultrabasic substrate, (2) early speciation events were restricted to ultrabasic substrate, (3) younger ancestral species dispersed into non-ultrabasic substrates, and (4) late speciation events were restricted to non-ultrabasic substrate. These results correspond to the hypothesis that New Caledonia once was more extensively covered by ultrabasic rocks than at present.

  • 6.
    Gehrke, Berit
    et al.
    University of Zurich, Institute for Systematic Botany.
    Bräuchler, Christian
    Department Biologie I, Systematische Botanik, LMU Munich.
    Romoleroux, Katia
    Herbario QCA, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador.
    Lundberg, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    Heubl, G
    Department Biologie I, Systematische Botanik, LMU Munich.
    Eriksson, Torsten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Bergius Botanical Garden Museum.
    Molecular phylogenetics of Alchemilla, Aphanes and Lachemilla (Rosaceae) inferred from plastid and nuclear intron and spacer DNA sequences, with comments on generic classification2008In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 47, p. 1030-1044Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alchemilla (the lady’s mantles) is a well known but inconspicuous group in the Rosaceae, notable for its ornamental leaves and pharmaceutical properties. The systematics of Alchemilla has remained poorly understood, most likely due to confusion resulting from apomixis, polyploidisation and hybridisation, which are frequently observed in the group, and which have led to the description of a large number of (micro-) species. A molecular phylogeny of the genus, including all sections of Alchemilla and Lachemilla as well as five representatives of Aphanes, based on the analysis of the chloroplast trnL–trnF and the nuclear ITS regions is presented here. Gene phylogenies reconstructed from the nuclear and chloroplast sequence data were largely congruent. Limited conflict between the data partitions was observed with respect to a small number of taxa. This is likely to be the result of hybridisation/introgression or incomplete lineage sorting. Four distinct clades were resolved, corresponding to major geographical division and life forms: Eurasian Alchemilla, annual Aphanes, South American Lachemilla and African Alchemilla. We argue for a wider circumscription of the genus Alchemilla, including Lachemilla and Aphanes, based on the morphology and the phylogenetic relationships between the different clades.

  • 7.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Malm, Tobias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Systematic Zoology.
    Testing the monophyly of Calocidae (Insecta: Trichoptera) based on multiple molecular data2010In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 54, p. 535-541Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Calocidae constitute a hypothesised monophyletic group of caddisflies (Trichoptera) being geographically restricted to New Zealand (one genus) and Australia (five genera). This analysis tests the monophyly of the family based on sequences from five different molecular genes. The complete data set includes 29 species and covers a complete genus representation of the Calocidae as well as representatives of other families in which one or more calocid genera have been classified. Sequences from two mitochondrial (cytochrome oxidase I and 16S) and three nuclear (elongation factor 1-a, RNA polymerase-II, and Cadherin) genes were used, resulting in a 3958 bp data set and 37.1% parsimony informative characters. The Cadherin (CAD) and RNA polymerase-II (POL-II) genes are used for the first time for revealing Trichoptera phylogenies. The character matrix was analyzed by using maximum parsimony (MP) and Bayesian criteria, the latter by applying three different partition strategies for comparison. Two most parsimonious trees were found, differing in the position of one clade within the sister-group to a monophyletic Calocidae. The Bayesian tree based on the maximum number of partitions differs from trees based on a reduced partition analysis with respect to taxa outside the current circumscription of Calocidae. Both the MP and Bayesian analyses left Calocidae monophyletic, with a monophyletic clade of all Australian genera being sister-group to the New Zealand genus. The results from the agreement subtree analysis demonstrates that CAD performs well both separately and in combination with other genes and adds substantial resolution to the calocid phylogeny in a combined MP analysis.

  • 8.
    Kodandaramaiah, Ullasa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Peña, Carlos
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Braby, Michael F.
    Grund, Roger
    Müller, Chris J.
    Nylin, Sören
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Wahlberg, Niklas
    Phylogenetics of Coenonymphina (Nymphalidae Satyrinae) and the problem of rooting rapid radiations2010In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 386-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a rapid radiation of a group of butterflies within the family Nymphalidae and examine some aspects of popular analytical methods in dealing with rapid radiations. We attempted to infer the phylogeny of butterflies belonging to the subtribe Coenonymphina sensu lato using five genes (4398bp) with Maximum Parsimony, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian analyses. Initial analyses suggested that the group has undergone rapid speciation within Australasia. We further analyzed the dataset with different outgroup combinations the choice of which had a profound effect on relationships within the ingroup. Modelling methods recovered Coenonymphina as a monophyletic group to the exclusion of Zipaetis and Orsotriaena, irrespective of outgroup combination. Maximum Parsimony occasionally returned a polyphyletic Coenonymphina, with Argyronympha grouping with outgroups, but this was strongly dependent on the outgroups used. We analyzed the ingroup without any outgroups and found that the relationships inferred among taxa were different from those inferred when either of the outgroup combinations was used, and this was true for all methods. We also tested whether a hard polytomy is a better hypothesis to explain our dataset, but could not find conclusive evidence. We therefore conclude that the major lineages within Coenonymphina form a near-hard polytomy with regard to each other. The study highlights the importance of testing different outgroups rather than using results from a single outgroup combination of a few taxa, particularly in difficult cases where basal nodes appear to receive low support. We provide a revised classification of Coenonymphina; Zipaetis and Orsotriaena are transferred to the tribe Eritina.

  • 9.
    Laenen, Benjamin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Patino, Jairo
    Hagborg, Anders
    Désamoré, Aurélie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Wang, Jian
    Shaw, A.
    Goffinet, Bernard
    Vanderpoorten, Alain
    Evolutionary origin of the latitudinal diversity gradient in liverworts2018In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 127, p. 606-612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A latitudinal diversity gradient towards the tropics appears as one most recurrent patterns in ecology, but the mechanisms underlying this pattern remain an area of controversy. In angiosperms, the tropical conservatism hypothesis proposes that most groups originated in the tropics and are adapted to a tropical climatic regime, and that relatively few species have evolved physiological adaptations to cold, dry or unpredictable climates. This mechanism is, however, unlikely to apply across land plants, and in particular, to liverworts, a group of about 7500 species, whose ability to withstand cold much better than their tracheophyte counterparts is at odds with the tropical conservatism hypothesis. Molecular dating, diversification rate analyses and ancestral area reconstructions were employed to explore the evolutionary mechanisms that account for the latitudinal diversity gradient in liverworts. As opposed to angiosperms, tropical liverwort genera are not older than their extratropical counterparts (median stem age of tropical and extra-tropical liverwort genera of 24.35 +/- 39.65 Ma and 39.57 +/- 49.07 Ma, respectively), weakening the `time for speciation hypothesis'. Models of ancestral area reconstructions with equal migration rates between tropical and extra-tropical regions outperformed models with asymmetrical migration rates in either direction. The symmetry and intensity of migrations between tropical and extra-tropical regions suggested by the lack of resolution in ancestral area reconstructions towards the deepest nodes are at odds with the tropical niche conservatism hypothesis. In turn, tropical genera exhibited significantly higher net diversification rates than extra-tropical ones, suggesting that the observed latitudinal diversity gradient results from either higher extinction rates in extra-tropical lineages or higher speciation rates in the tropics. We discuss a series of experiments to help deciphering the underlying evolutionary mechanisms.

  • 10.
    Lundberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    Töpel, Mats
    Gothenburg University, Department of Environmental Sciences.
    Eriksen, Bente
    Gothenburg University, Department of Environmental Sciences.
    Nylander, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    Eriksson, Torsten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Bergius Botanical Garden Museum.
    Allopolyploidy in Fragariinae (Rosaceae): Comparing four DNA sequence regions, with comments on classification2009In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 269-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Potential events of allopolyploidy may be indicated by incongruences between separate phylogenies based on plastid and nuclear gene sequences. We sequenced two plastid regions and two nuclear ribosomal regions for 34 ingroup taxa in Fragariinae (Rosaceae), and six outgroup taxa. We found five well supported incongruences that might indicate allopolyploidy events. The incongruences involved Aphanes arvensis, Potentilla miyabei, Potentilla cuneata, Fragaria vesca/moschata, and the Drymocallis clade. We evaluated the strength of conflict and conclude that allopolyploidy may be hypothesised in the four first cases. Phylogenies were estimated using Bayesian inference and analyses were evaluated using convergence diagnostics. Taxonomic implications are discussed for genera such as Alchemilla, Sibbaldianthe, Chamaerhodos, Drymocallis and Fragaria, and for the monospecific Sibbaldiopsis and Potaninia that are nested inside other genera. Two orphan Potentilla species, P. miyabei and P. cuneata are placed in Fragariinae. However, due to unresolved topological incongruences they are not reclassified in any genus.

  • 11.
    Manns, Ulrika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Bergius Botanical Garden Museum.
    Bremer, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Bergius Botanical Garden Museum.
    Towards a better understanding of intertribal relationships and stable tribal delimitations within Cinchonoideae s.s. (Rubiaceae)2010In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 21-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on the subfamily Cinchonoideae s.s. utilizing information from six DNA markers and 206 taxa. The nine tribes (i.e. Cinchoneae, Chiococceae s.l., Guettardeae s.s., Hamelieae, Hillieae, Hymenodictyeae, Isertieae, Naucleeae s.l., and Rondeletieae s.s.) are resolved in four major lineages, all strongly supported and relationships between them are resolved. The tropical American Cinchoneae and Isertieae constitute the first diverging lineage within the subfamily, followed by the predominantly paleotropical Naucleeae and Hymenodictyeae. The remaining two lineages primarily include neotropical taxa: Rondeletieae and Guettardeae are sister clades in the first, while the second comprises Chiococceae, Hamelieae, and Hillieae. Additionally, taxonomic placement of several genera, not previously included in molecular analyses, were confirmed: Acunaeanthus belongs in Rondeletieae, Ottoschmidtia in Guettardeae, Nernstia in Chiococceae, Pinarophyllon, Plocaniophyllon, and Syringantha in Hamelieae, and Balmea in Hillieae. Colleteria, of previously unknown taxonomic position, is resolved as sister to Chione.

  • 12. Olsson, Urban
    et al.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Sangster, George
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Systematic Zoology.
    Ericson, Per G. P.
    Alström, Per
    Systematic revision of the avian family Cisticolidae based on a multi-locus phylogeny of all genera2013In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 790-799Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The avian taxon Cisticolidae includes c. 110 species which are distributed throughout the tropical and subtropical parts of the Old World. We estimated the phylogeny of 47 species representing all genera assumed to be part of Cisticolidae based on sequence data from two mitochondrial and two nuclear markers, in total 3495 bp. Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood analyses resulted in a generally well-supported phylogeny which clarified the position of several previously poorly known taxa. The placement of Drymocichla, Malcorus, Micromacronus, Oreophilais, Phragmacia, Phyllolais, Poliolais and Urorhipis in Cisticolidae is corroborated, whereas Rhopophilus and Scotocerca are removed from Cisticolidae. Urorhipis and Heliolais are placed in the genus Prinia whereas Prinia burnesii is shown to be part of Timaliidae, and is placed in the genus Laticilla. Although not recovered by all single loci independently, four major clades were identified within Cisticolidae, and one of these is here described as a new taxon (Neomixinae).

  • 13. Patino, Jairo
    et al.
    Wang, Jian
    Renner, Matt A. M.
    Gradstein, S. Robbert
    Laenen, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Devos, Nicolas
    Shaw, A. Jonathan
    Vanderpoorten, Alain
    Range size heritability and diversification patterns in the liverwort genus Radula2017In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 106, p. 73-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Why some species exhibit larger geographical ranges than others, and to what extent does variation in range size affect diversification rates, remains a fundamental, but largely unanswered question in ecology and evolution. Here, we implement phylogenetic comparative analyses and ancestral area estimations in Radula, a liverwort genus of Cretaceous origin, to investigate the mechanisms that explain differences in geographical range size and diversification rates among lineages. Range size was phylogenetically constrained in the two sub-genera characterized by their almost complete Australasian and Neotropical endemicity, respectively. The congruence between the divergence time of these lineages and continental split suggests that plate tectonics could have played a major role in their present distribution, suggesting that a strong imprint of vicariance can still be found in extant distribution patterns in these highly mobile organisms. Amentuloradula, Volutoradula and Metaradula species did not appear to exhibit losses of dispersal capacities in terms of dispersal life-history traits, but evidence for significant phylogenetic signal in macroecological niche traits suggests that niche conservatism accounts for their restricted geographic ranges. Despite their greatly restricted distribution to Australasia and Neotropics respectively, Amentuloradula and Volutoradula did not exhibit significantly lower diversification rates than more widespread lineages, in contrast with the hypothesis that the probability of speciation increases with range size by promoting geographic isolation and increasing the rate at which novel habitats are encountered. We suggest that stochastic long-distance dispersal events may balance allele frequencies across large spatial scales, leading to low genetic structure among geographically distant areas or even continents, ultimately decreasing the diversification rates in highly mobile, widespread lineages.

  • 14.
    Peña, Carlos
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Wahlberg, Niklas
    Weingartner, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Kodandaramaiah, Ullasa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Nylin, Sören
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Higher level phylogeny of Satyrinae butterflies (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) based on DNA sequence data2006In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 29-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have inferred the first empirically supported hypothesis of relationships for the cosmopolitan butterfly subfamily Satyrinae. We used 3090 base pairs of DNA from the mitochondrial gene COI and the nuclear genes EF-1alpha and wingless for 165 Satyrinae taxa representing 4 tribes and 15 subtribes, and 26 outgroups, in order to test the monophyly of the subfamily and elucidate phylogenetic relationships of its major lineages. In a combined analysis, the three gene regions supported an almost fully resolved topology, which recovered Satyrinae as polyphyletic, and revealed that the current classification of suprageneric taxa within the subfamily is comprised almost completely of unnatural assemblages. The most noteworthy findings are that Manataria is closely related to Melanitini; Palaeonympha belongs to Euptychiina; Oressinoma, Orsotriaena and Coenonympha group with the Hypocystina; Miller's (1968). Parargina is polyphyletic and its components group with multiple distantly related lineages; and the subtribes Elymniina and Zetherina fall outside the Satyrinae. The three gene regions used in a combined analysis prove to be very effective in resolving relationships of Satyrinae at the subtribal and tribal levels. Further sampling of the taxa closely related to Satyrinae, as well as more extensive sampling of genera within the tribes and subtribes for this group will be critical to test the monophyly of the subfamily and establish a stronger basis for future biogeographical and evolutionary studies.

  • 15.
    Razafimandimbison, Sylvain G.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    Appelhans, Marc S.
    Rabarison, Harison
    Haevermans, Thomas
    Rakotondrafara, Andriarimalala
    Rakotonandrasana, Stephan R.
    Ratsimbason, Michel
    Labat, Jean-Noel
    Kessler, Paul J. A.
    Smets, Erik
    Cruaud, Corinne
    Couloux, Arnaud
    Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona
    Implications of a molecular phylogenetic study of the Malagasy genus Cedrelopsis and its relatives (Ptaeroxylaceae)2010In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 258-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ptaeroxylaceae is an Afro-Malagasy family containing three genera, Bottegoa. Cedrelopsis, and Ptaeroxylon. Although the family is morphologically well delimited, it is currently considered part of the subfamily Spathelioideae in a broadly circumscribed orange family (Rutaceae). The Malagasy Cedrelopsis has traditionally been associated with different families of the order Sapindales and its phylogenetic placement in Rutaceae sensu lato has yet to be tested with molecular data. The present molecular phylogenetic study reaffirms the monophyly of Ptaeroxylaceae and its placement in Spathelioideae. Therefore, molecules and morphology support close affinities between Bottegoa, Cedrelopsis, and Ptaeroxylon and also their current generic circumscriptions. We report a case of an evolutionary change from one-seeded to two-seeded carpels within the Harrisonia-Cneorum-Ptaeroxylaceae clade of Spathelioideae. Finally, the sister-group relationship between the African Bottegoa and the Afro-Malagasy Ptaeroxylon-Cedrelopsis clade suggests an African origin of Cedrelopsis.

  • 16.
    Razafimandimbison, Sylvain G.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Bergius Botanical Garden Museum.
    Rydin, Catarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Bergius Botanical Garden Museum.
    Bremer, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Bergius Botanical Garden Museum.
    Evolution and trends in the Psychotrieae alliance (Rubiaceae) - A rarely reported evolutionary change of many-seeded carpels from one-seeded carpels2008In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 207-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bayesian and parsimony analyses of five plastid gene and nrITS regions from 58 Rubioideae (Rubiaceae) taxa further support the sister-group relationship between the African monotypic genus Schizocolea and the Psychotrieae alliance sensu Bremer & Manen. Our analyses show that the Psychotrieae alliance can be subdivided into in four well-supported clades: Schizocolea, (Schradereae(Gaertnereae(Mitchelleae–Morindeae s.s.))), Palicoureeae–Psychotrieae s.s., and Craterispermeae–Prismatomerideae. The relationships between the latter three clades remain unsettled. Our study further reveals much higher numbers of molecular autapomorphies of the tribes compared with those of molecular synapomorphies of two sister tribes or groups of tribes. Within the newly delimited Psychotrieae alliance a one-seeded carpelwas inferred as ancestral and many- and two-seeded carpels evolved once each. We describe Mitchelleae to accommodate Damnacanthus and Mitchella and restrict Morindeae to include only Appunia, Coelospermum, Gynochthodes, Morinda, Pogonolobus, and Syphonandrium. Mitchelleae is characterized e.g., by placentae inserted near the top of the septum and a single campylotropous ovule per carpel, while Morindeae s.s. has massive and T-shaped placentae inserted in the middle of the septum and two anatropous ovules per carpel.

  • 17. Rose, Jeffrey P.
    et al.
    Kleist, Thomas J.
    Löfstrand, Stefan D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Drew, Bryan T.
    Schönenberger, Juerg
    Sytsma, Kenneth J.
    Phylogeny, historical biogeography, and diversification of angiosperm order Ericales suggest ancient Neotropical and East Asian connections2018In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 122, p. 59-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inferring interfamilial relationships within the eudicot order Ericales has remained one of the more recalcitrant problems in angiosperm phylogenetics, likely due to a rapid, ancient radiation. As a result, no comprehensive time-calibrated tree or biogeographical analysis of the order has been published. Here, we elucidate phylogenetic relationships within the order and then conduct time-dependent biogeographical and diversification analyses by using a taxon and locus-rich supermatrix approach on one-third of the extant species diversity calibrated with 23 macrofossils and two secondary calibration points. Our results corroborate previous studies and also suggest several new but poorly supported relationships. Newly suggested relationships are: (1) holoparasitic Mitrastemonaceae is sister to Lecythidaceae, (2) the clade formed by Mitrastemonaceae + Lecythidaceae is sister to Ericales excluding balsaminoids, (3) Theaceae is sister to the styracoids + sarracenioids + ericoids, and (4) subfamilial relationships with Ericaceae suggest that Arbutoideae is sister to Monotropoideae and Pyroloideae is sister to all subfamilies excluding Arbutoideae, Enkianthoideae, and Monotropoideae. Our results indicate Ericales began to diversify 110 Mya, within Indo-Malaysia and the Neotropics, with exchange between the two areas and expansion out of Indo-Malaysia becoming an important area in shaping the extant diversity of many families. Rapid cladogenesis occurred along the backbone of the order between 104 and 106 Mya. Jump dispersal is important within the order in the last 30 My, but vicariance is the most important cladogenetic driver of disjunctions at deeper levels of the phylogeny. We detect between 69 and 81 shifts in speciation rate throughout the order, the vast majority of which occurred within the last 30 My. We propose that range shifting may be responsible for older shifts in speciation rate, but more recent shifts may be better explained by morphological innovation.

  • 18. Sangster, George
    The taxonomic status of 'phylogroups' in the Parus teneriffae complex (Aves): Comments on the paper by Kvist et al. (2005)2006In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 288-289Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Sangster, George
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Systematic Zoology.
    Alström, Per
    Forsmark, Emma
    Olsson, Urban
    Multi-locus phylogenetic analysis of Old World chats and flycatchers reveals extensive paraphyly at family, subfamily and genus level (Aves: Muscicapidae).2010In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 57, p. 380-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chats and flycatchers (Muscicapidae) represent an assemblage of 275 species in 48 genera. Defining natural groups within this assemblage has been challenging because of its high diversity and a paucity of phylogenetically informative morphological characters. We assessed the phylogenetic relationships of 118 species and 34 genera of Muscicapidae, and 20 species of Turdidae, using molecular sequence data from one mitochondrial gene and three nuclear loci, in total 3240 bp. Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses yielded a well-resolved tree in which nearly all basal nodes were strongly supported. The traditionally defined Muscicapidae, Muscicapinae and Saxicolinae were paraphyletic. Four major clades are recognized in Muscicapidae: Muscicapinae, Niltavinae (new family-group name), Erithacinae and Saxicolinae. Interesting relationships recovered by this analysis include: (i) a clade comprising the ‘blue’ flycatcher genera Niltava, Cyornis, Cyanoptila and Eumyias and some species of Rhinomyias; (ii) the position of Erithacus rubecula in a clade of otherwise exclusively African species; (iii) a close relationship between the shortwing Heinrichia calligyna and the flycatcher Rhinomyias insignis; (iv) a sister relationship between forktails Enicurus and whistling thrushes Myophonus; and (v) a sister relationship of Ficedula and the ‘chats’ Monticola, Phoenicurus, Saxicola and Oenanthe. A high number of traditionally defined genera was found to be paraphyletic or polyphyletic. Taxonomic implications are discussed.

  • 20. Sanudo-Restrepo, Claudia P.
    et al.
    Dinca, Vlad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Talavera, Gerard
    Vila, Roger
    Biogeography and systematics of Aricia butterflies (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae)2013In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 369-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Butterflies of the Aricia species group represent a paradigm of unresolved taxonomy, both at the genus and species levels. We studied phylogenetic relationships, biogeography, and systematics based on genetic - nuclear and mitochondrial - and morphometric - external (wings) and internal (genitalia) data. We show that Aricia is a monophyletic genus comprising the taxa Pseudoaricia, Ultraaricia and Umpria, which are here considered junior synonyms of Aricia. The taxa allous, inhonora, issekutzi, mandzhuriana, myrmecias and transalaica, which have often been raised to species rank, are shown to probably represent subspecies or synonyms. We show that montensis is likely a good species that is sister to all A. artaxerxes populations across the Palearctic region. The species A. anteros and A. morronensis are shown to display deep intraspecific divergences and they may harbor cryptic species. We also discovered that A. cramera and A. agestis exhibit a pattern of mutual exclusion on islands, and a parapatric distribution in mainland with a narrow contact zone where potential hybrids were detected. The lack of a prezygotic barrier that prevents their coexistence could explain this phenomenon. This study will hopefully contribute to the stability of the systematics of Aricia, a group with potential for the study of the link between speciation and biogeography.

  • 21.
    Smedmark, Jenny E. E.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. University of Bergen .
    Razafimandimbison, Sylvain G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Wikström, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Bremer, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Inferring geographic range evolution of a pantropical tribe in the coffee family (Lasiantheae, Rubiaceae) in the face of topological uncertainty2014In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 70, p. 182-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we explore what historical biogeographic events are responsible for the wide and disjunct distribution of extant species in Lasiantheae, a pantropical group of trees and shrubs in the coffee family. Three of the genera in the group, Lasianthus, Saldinia, and Trichostachys, are found to be monophyletic, while there are indications that the fourth, Ronabea, is paraphyletic. We also address how the uncertainty in topology and divergence times affects the level of confidence in the biogeographic reconstruction. A data set consisting of chloroplast and nuclear ribosomal DNA data was analyzed using a Bayesian relaxed molecular clock approach to estimate phylogenetic relationships and divergence times, and the dispersal-extinction-cladogenesis (DEC) method to reconstruct geographic range evolution. Our results show that the Lasiantheae stem lineage originated in the neotropics, and the group expanded its range to the palaeotropics during the Eocene, either by continental migration through the boreotropics or by transatlantic long-distance dispersal. Two cases of Oligocene/Miocene over water-dispersal were also inferred, once from the paleotropics to the neotropics within Lasianthus, and once to Madagascar, concurrent with the origin of Saldinia. A lot of the diversification within Lasianthus took place during the Miocene and may have been influenced by climatic factors such as a period of markedly warm and moist climate in Asia and the aridification of the interior of the African continent. When biogeographic reconstructions were averaged over a random sample of 1000 dated phylogenies, the confidence in the biogeographic reconstruction decreased for most nodes, compared to when a single topology was used. A good understanding of phylogenetic relationships is necessary to understand the biogeographic history of a group, bit since the phylogeny is rarely completely known it is important to include phylogenetic uncertainty in biogeographic analysis. For nodes where the resolution is uncertain, the use of a single best topology as a basis for biogeographic analysis will result in inflated confidence in a biogeographic reconstruction which may be just one of several possible reconstructions.

  • 22.
    Wahlberg, Emma
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Johanson, Kjell Arne
    The age, ancestral distribution and radiation of Chimarra (Trichoptera: Philopotamidae) using molecular methods2014In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 79, p. 433-442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phylogeny of Chimarra has previously been examined using morphological characters for a smaller subset of taxa and geographical representativeness. Here molecular data from three genes (COI, CAD and POL-II) are used to reconstruct the phylogeny of the genus. The results show Chimarra to be monophyletic, and that some of the sister groups are paraphyletic. Previous hypotheses regarding the relationships of subgenera within the genus are corroborated but incongruences are also found compared to morphological characters that have been used in keys. The origin of the genus is explored using three different hypotheses of biogeographical region. The biogeography analyses reveal an origin in the Neotropical region and a subsequent rapid radiation, with dispersal into the Oriental, Palaearctic and Australasian regions and secondarily to the Nearctic region. The Afrotropical region has been colonized in several independent events. The molecular dating using a relaxed clock and calibration with four fossil species indicates that Chimarra is about 138 million years old, and that the radiation out of the Neotropical region occurred approximately 124 million years ago.

  • 23. Xie, Peiwu
    et al.
    Tu, Tieyao
    Razafimandimbison, Sylvain G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Bergius Botanical Garden Museum.
    Zhu, Chengjie
    Zhang, Dianxiang
    Phylogenetic position of Guihaiothamnus (Rubiaceae): Its evolutionary and ecological implications2014In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 78, p. 375-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Guihaiothamnus (Rubiaceae) is an enigmatic, monotypic genus endemic to southwestern China. Its generic status has never been doubted because it is morphologically unique by having rosette habit, showy, long-corolla-tubed flowers, and multi-seeded indehiscent berry-like fruits. The genus has been postulated to be a relict in the broad-leaved forests of China, and to be related to the genus Wendlandia, which was placed in the subfamily Cinchonoideae and recently classified in the tribe Augusteae of the subfamily Dialypetalanthoideae. Using combined evidence from palynology, cytology, and DNA sequences of nuclear ITS and four plastid markers (rps16, trnT-F, ndhF, rbcL), we assessed the phylogenetic position of Guihaiothamnus in Rubiaceae. Our molecular phylogenetic analyses placed the genus deeply nested within Wendlandia. This relationship is corroborated by evidence from palynology and cytology. Using a relaxed molecular clock method based on five fossil records, we dated the stem age of Wendlandia to be 17.46 my and, the split between G. acaulis and related Wendlandia species in southwestern China to be 2.11 mya. This young age, coupled with the derived position in Wendlandia, suggests an evolutionary derivation rather than an evolutionary relict of G. acaulis. Its rosette habit and large showy flowers, which are very distinctive from other Wendlandias, are interpreted as a result of recent rapid adaptation to rock and cliff habitats.

1 - 23 of 23
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf