Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Acerbi, Alberto
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Bentley, R. Alexander
    Biases in cultural transmission shape the turnover of popular traits2014In: Evolution and human behavior, ISSN 1090-5138, E-ISSN 1879-0607, Vol. 35, p. 228-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The neutral model of cultural evolution, which assumes that copying is unbiased, provides precise predictions regarding frequency distributions of traits and the turnover within a popularity-ranked list. Here we study turnover in ranked lists and identify where the turnover departs from neutral model predictions to detect transmission biases in three different domains: color terms usage in English language 20th century books, popularity of early (1880–1930) and recent (1960–2010) USA baby names, and musical preferences of users of the Web site Last.fm. To help characterize the type of transmission bias, we modify the neutral model to include a content-based bias and two context-based biases (conformity and anti-conformity). How these modified models match real data helps us to infer, from population scale observations, when cultural transmission is biased, and, to some extent, what kind of biases are operating at individual level.

  • 2. Conroy-Beam, Daniel
    et al.
    Roney, James R.
    Lukaszewski, Aaron W.
    Buss, David M.
    Asao, Kelly
    Sorokowska, Agnieszka
    Sorokowski, Piotr
    Aavik, Toivo
    Akello, Grace
    Alhabahba, Mohammad Madallh
    Alm, Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Amjad, Naumana
    Anjum, Afifa
    Atama, Chiemezie S.
    Duyar, Derya Atamturk
    Ayebare, Richard
    Batres, Carlota
    Bendixen, Mons
    Bensafia, Aicha
    Bertoni, Anna
    Bizumic, Boris
    Boussena, Mahmoud
    Butovskaya, Marina
    Can, Seda
    Cantarero, Katarzyna
    Carrier, Antonin
    Cetinkaya, Hakan
    Croy, Ilona
    Maria Cueto, Rosa
    Czub, Marcin
    Donato, Silvia
    Dronova, Daria
    Dural, Seda
    Duyar, Izzet
    Ertugrul, Berna
    Espinosa, Agustin
    Estevan, Ignacio
    Esteves, Carla Sofia
    Fang, Luxi
    Frackowiak, Tomasz
    Garduno, Jorge Contreras
    Ugalde Gonzalez, Karina
    Guemaz, Farida
    Gyuris, Petra
    Halamova, Maria
    Herak, Iskra
    Horvat, Marina
    Hromatko, Ivana
    Hui, Chin-Ming
    Iafrate, Raffaella
    Jaafar, Jas Laile
    Jiang, Feng
    Kafetsios, Konstantinos
    Kavcic, Tina
    Kennair, Leif Edward Ottesen
    Kervyn, Nicolas
    Truong, Thi
    Khilji, Imran Ahmed
    Kobis, Nils C.
    Hoang, Moc
    Lang, Andras
    Lennard, Georgina R.
    Leon, Ernesto
    Lindholm, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Trinh, Thi
    Lopez, Giulia
    Nguyen, Van
    Mailhos, Alvaro
    Manesi, Zoi
    Martinez, Rocio
    McKerchar, Sarah L.
    Mesko, Norbert
    Misra, Girishwar
    Monaghan, Conal
    Mora, Emanuel C.
    Moya-Garofano, Alba
    Musil, Bojan
    Natividade, Jean Carlos
    Niemczyk, Agnieszka
    Nizharadze, George
    Oberzaucher, Elisabeth
    Oleszkiewicz, Anna
    Omar-Fauzee, Mohd Sofian
    Onyishi, Ike E.
    Ozener, Baris
    Pagani, Ariela Francesca
    Pakalniskiene, Vilmante
    Parise, Miriam
    Pazhoohi, Farid
    Pisanski, Annette
    Pisanski, Katarzyna
    Ponciano, Edna
    Popa, Camelia
    Prokop, Pavol
    Rizwan, Muhammad
    Sainz, Mario
    Salkicevic, Svjetlana
    Sargautyte, Ruta
    Sarmany-Schuller, Ivan
    Schmehl, Susanne
    Sharad, Shivantika
    Siddiqui, Razi Sultan
    Simonetti, Franco
    Stoyanova, Stanislava Yordanova
    Tadinac, Meri
    Correa Varella, Marco Antonio
    Vauclair, Christin-Melanie
    Diego Vega, Luis
    Widarini, Dwi Ajeng
    Yoo, Gyesook
    Zatkova, Marta
    Zupancic, Maja
    Assortative mating and the evolution of desirability covariation2019In: Evolution and human behavior, ISSN 1090-5138, E-ISSN 1879-0607, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 479-491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mate choice lies dose to differential reproduction, the engine of evolution. Patterns of mate choice consequently have power to direct the course of evolution. Here we provide evidence suggesting one pattern of human mate choice-the tendency for mates to be similar in overall desirability-caused the evolution of a structure of correlations that we call the d factor. We use agent-based models to demonstrate that assortative mating causes the evolution of a positive manifold of desirability, d, such that an individual who is desirable as a mate along any one dimension tends to be desirable across all other dimensions. Further, we use a large cross-cultural sample with n = 14,478 from 45 countries around the world to show that this d-factor emerges in human samples, is a cross-cultural universal, and is patterned in a way consistent with an evolutionary history of assortative mating. Our results suggest that assortative mating can explain the evolution of a broad structure of human trait covariation.

  • 3.
    Cownden, Daniel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. University of Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Eriksson, Kimmo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Strimling, Pontus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Institute for Futures Studies, Sweden.
    A popular misapplication of evolutionary modeling to the study of human cooperation2017In: Evolution and human behavior, ISSN 1090-5138, E-ISSN 1879-0607, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 421-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To examine the evolutionary basis of a behavior, an established approach (known as the phenotypic gambit) is to assume that the behavior is controlled by a single allele, the fitness effects of which are derived from a consideration of how the behavior interacts, via life-history, with other ecological factors. Here we contrast successful applications of this approach with several examples of an influential and superficially similar line of research on the evolutionary basis of human cooperation. A key difference is identified: in the latter line of research the focal behavior, cooperation, is abstractly defined in terms of immediate fitness costs and benefits. Selection is then assumed to act on strategies in an iterated social context for which fitness effects can be derived by aggregation of the abstractly defined immediate fitness effects over a lifetime. This approach creates a closed theoretical loop, rendering models incapable of making predictions or providing insight into the origin of human cooperation. We conclude with a discussion of how evolutionary approaches might be appropriately used in the study of human social behavior.

  • 4.
    de Barra, Mícheál
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. University of London, England.
    DeBruine, Lisa M.
    Jones, Benedict C.
    Mahmud, Zahid Hayat
    Curtis, Valerie A.
    Illness in childhood predicts face preferences in adulthood2013In: Evolution and human behavior, ISSN 1090-5138, E-ISSN 1879-0607, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 384-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The value of different mate choices may depend on the local pathogen ecology and on personal infection susceptibility: when there is a high risk of infection, choosing a healthy or immunocompetent mate may be particularly important. Frequency of childhood illness may act as a cue of the ecological and immunological factors relevant to mate preferences. Consistent with this proposal, we found that childhood illness - and frequency of diarrhea in particular - was positively correlated with preferences for exaggerated sex-typical characteristics in opposite-sex, but not same-sex, faces. Moreover, this relationship was stronger among individuals with poorer current health. These data suggest that childhood illness may play a role in calibrating adult mate preferences and have implications for theories of disease-avoidance psychology, life-history strategy and cross-cultural differences in mate preferences.

  • 5.
    Eriksson, Kimmo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Coultas, Julie C.
    The advantage of multiple cultural parents in the cultural transmission of stories2012In: Evolution and human behavior, ISSN 1090-5138, E-ISSN 1879-0607, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 251-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent mathematical modeling of repeated cultural transmission has shown that the rate at which culture is lost (due to imperfect transmission) will crucially depend on whether individuals receive transmissions from many cultural parents or only from one. However, the modeling assumptions leading up to this conclusion have so far not been empirically assessed. Here we do this for the special case of transmission chains where each individual either receives the same story twice from one cultural parent (and retransmits twice to a cultural child) or receives possibly different versions of the story from two cultural parents (and then retransmits to two cultural children). For this case, we first developed a more general mathematical model of cultural retention that takes into account the possibility of dependence of error rates between transmissions. In this model, under quite plausible assumptions, chains with two cultural parents will have superior retention of culture. This prediction was then tested in two experiments using both written and oral modes of transmission. In both cases, superior retention of culture was found in chains with two cultural parents. Estimation of model parameters indicated that error rates were not identical and independent between transmissions; instead, a primacy effect was suggested, such that the first transmission tends to have higher fidelity than the second transmission.

  • 6. Goodman, Anna
    et al.
    Koupil, Ilona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Social and biological determinants of reproductive success in Swedish males and females born 1915-19292009In: Evolution and human behavior, ISSN 1090-5138, E-ISSN 1879-0607, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 329-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studying biological and social determinants of mortality and fertility provides insight into selective pressures in a population and the possibility of trade-offs between short- and long-term reproductive success. Limited data is available from post-demographic transition populations. We studied determinants of reproductive success using multi-generational data from a large, population-based cohort of 13,666 individuals born in Sweden between 1915 and 1929. We studied the effects of birthweight for gestational age, preterm birth, birth multiplicity, birth order, mother's age, mother's marital status and family socioeconomic position (SEP) upon reproductive success, measured as total number of children and grandchildren. We further tested the hypothesis that number of grandchildren would peak at intermediate family size, as predicted by some life history explanations for fertility limitation. Reproductive success was associated with both social and biological characteristics at birth. In both sexes, a higher birthweight for gestational age, a term birth and a younger mother were independently associated with a greater number of descendants. A married mother and higher family SEP were also associated with a greater number of descendants in males (but not in females), while higher birth order was associated with a greater number of descendents in females (but not males). These effects were mediated by sex-specific effects upon the probability of marriage. Marriage was also affected by other early life characteristics including birthweight, indicating how ‘biological’ characteristics may operate via social pathways. Number of grandchildren increased with increasing number of children in both sexes, providing no evidence for a trade-off between quantity of offspring and their subsequent reproductive ‘quality’.

  • 7. Goodman, Anna
    et al.
    Koupil, Ilona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    The effect of school performance upon marriage and long-term reproductive success in 10,000 Swedish males and females born 1915–19292010In: Evolution and human behavior, ISSN 1090-5138, E-ISSN 1879-0607, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 425-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Humans are an exceptionally intelligent species, and the selective pressures which may have shaped these advanced cognitive powers are therefore of interest. This study investigates the fitness consequences of pre-reproductive school performance in a Swedish population-based cohort of 5244 males and 4863 females born 1915-1929. School performance was measured at around age 10 using three variables: mean school marks, being promoted/held back in school, and recognised learning difficulties. Our primary outcomes were probability of ever marrying, total number of children and total number of grandchildren. In males (but not females), poorer school performance predicted fewer children and grandchildren. This was primarily mediated via probability of marriage; mortality and fertility within marriage were not important mediating pathways. The effect of school performance upon marriage in males was independent of early-life social and biological characteristics, including birth weight for gestational age, preterm birth, family composition, and family socioeconomic position. The effect of school performance upon the probability of marriage in males was, however, largely mediated by adult socioeconomic position. This suggests that in general sexual selection for cognitive abilities per se did not play a major role in either males or females in this cohort. Adult socioeconomic position did not, however, fully explain the marriage disadvantage in males or (at marginal significance) females with particularly poor school performance. We conclude that school performance can affect long-term reproductive success. In this population, however, the effect is confined to males and is largely mediated by the increased probability of marriage which comes with their greater socioeconomic success.

  • 8.
    Uggla, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. University of Bristol, UK.
    Gurmu, Eshetu
    Gibson, Mhairi A.
    Are wives and daughters disadvantaged in polygynous households? A case study of the Arsi Oromo of Ethiopia2018In: Evolution and human behavior, ISSN 1090-5138, E-ISSN 1879-0607, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 160-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whether polygyny is harmful for women and their children is a long-standing question in anthropology. Few studies, however, have explored whether the effect of polygyny varies for women of different wife order, and whether there are different outcomes for their sons and daughters. Because males have higher reproductive variance, especially when they are allowed to take multiple wives, parents may have higher fitness returns from investing in sons over daughters in polygynous households. Moreover, previous studies have found that first wives and their children are advantaged over monogamous and second order wives (who marry into unions later). Here we test the predictions that children of first wives will have an advantage over children to monogamous or second wives, and that sex-biased investment will be strongest among first wives. Using data from the Arsi Oromo of Ethiopia (n-6200 children) we test whether associations with mother's wife order extend beyond childhood into adulthood by examining simultaneously child survival, education and age at marriage. We find that polygynous first wives have no child survival disadvantage, first wives' sons benefit in terms of longer education and daughters have an earlier age at marriage than daughters of monogamous women. Second wives have lower child survival than monogamous women, but surviving children experience advantages in later life outcomes, particularly marriage. These findings challenge the view that polygynous women are always doing the 'best of a bad job'. Rather, our results suggest that via their surviving sons and daughters there may be long-term benefits for some polygynous women.

  • 9. Yao, Shuyang
    et al.
    Långström, Niklas
    Temrin, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Walum, Hasse
    Criminal offending as part of an alternative reproductive strategy: investigating evolutionary hypotheses using Swedish total population data2014In: Evolution and human behavior, ISSN 1090-5138, E-ISSN 1879-0607, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 481-488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Criminality is highly costly to victims and their relatives, but often also to offenders. From an evolutionary viewpoint, criminal behavior may persist despite adverse consequences by providing offenders with fitness benefits as part of a successful alternative mating strategy. Specifically, criminal behavior may have evolved as a reproductive strategy based on low parental investment reflected in low commitment in reproductive relationships. We linked data from nationwide total population registers in Sweden to test if criminality is associated with reproductive success. Further, we used several different measures related to monogamy to determine the relation between criminal behavior and alternative mating tactics. Convicted criminal offenders had more children than individuals never convicted of a criminal offense. Criminal offenders also had more reproductive partners, were less often married, more likely to get remarried if ever married, and had more often contracted a sexually transmitted disease than non-offenders. Importantly, the increased reproductive success of criminals was explained by a fertility increase from having children with several different partners. We conclude that criminality appears to be adaptive in a contemporary industrialized country, and that this association can be explained by antisocial behavior being part of an adaptive alternative reproductive strategy.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf