Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bruun, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law. Hanken School of Economics, Finland.
    Guest editorial: Sanctions and Remedies for Unlawful Collective Action in an International and European Perspective2014In: International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations, ISSN 0952-617X, E-ISSN 1875-838X, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 243-251Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Bruun, Niklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law, The Institute for Social Law.
    Bücker, Andreas
    Dorssenont, Filip
    Balancing Fundamental Social Rights and Economic Freedoms . Can the Monti II Initiative Solve the EU Dilemma?2012In: International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations, ISSN 0952-617X, E-ISSN 1875-838X, ISSN 0952-617x, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 279-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article evaluates the recent (March 2012) legislative initiative by the European Commission for a regulation (known as Monti II) on the exercise of the right to take collective action within the context of the freedom of establishment and the freedom to provide services. The authors put forward a critique of the legal basis, content and form of the proposal, which has already been challenged by Parliaments in twelve Member States. The authors propose the adoption of a revised initiative that would make a clear commitment to international law and labour standards. It should recognize the autonomy of the social partners and a margin of manoeuvre for trade union action, foreseeing only limited judicial review in accordance with international practice. The proposed articles on dispute resolution and an alert mechanism should be deleted, and the appropriate form of the revised proposal could be based on guidelines adopted on the basis of Article 26(3) TFEU.

  • 3.
    Bruun, Niklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law. Hanken School of Economics, Finland.
    Johansson, Caroline
    Sanctions for Unlawful Collective Action in the Nordic Countries and Germany2014In: International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations, ISSN 0952-617X, E-ISSN 1875-838X, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 253-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article compares the industrial relations systems in Finland, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and Germany with the aim of exploring the approach to remedies and sanctions in order to find out whether national remedies and sanctions for unlawful industrial action could also be applicable to situations of 'unlawful Collective Action under EU law'. In our opinion, it is crucial for such a comparison to focus not just on the legal remedies at hand in the national legal context, but also to take into account the context of industrial relations in which they function. A comparative study of sanctions and remedies in the Nordic countries and Germany opens up a spectrum of rather complicated rules that have been fine-tuned in legal practice at national level over several decades, including rules on defining lawful collective action, mediation, and interim injunctions. The legislator and the courts have built national systems that are based on an acceptance of Collective Action as a legitimate tool for trade unions, a tool that is not allowed to be misused and that has been developed to support and fit into the national industrial relations system and traditions of collective bargaining. The starting point is that unlawful Collective Action should be subject to economic sanctions, but these sanctions should not endanger continued contractual relations between the labour market parties. Economic sanctions are not primarily calculated on the basis of economic loss on the part of the employers, but many factors are taken into account, such as the size of the trade union as well as any mitigating and aggravating factors in accordance with national law and practice. These aspects should be taken into account also in cases of 'EU-unlawful' collective action.

  • 4.
    Calleman, Catharina
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Family Ties in Swedish Employment Law2009In: International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations, ISSN 0952-617X, E-ISSN 1875-838X, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 431-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Members of an employer’s family are exempted from the Swedish Employment Protection Act. This exception, which may be seen in the light of the ban on discrimination on the grounds of family status of EC law, strengthens the prerogative of the employer. It may have the consequence that the working party has no employment contract, pay, or other benefits and also no union membership or other connection to the labour market. It also typically increases the dependence of an employer’s spouse, counteracting the aim of mutual autonomy between spouses in Swedish family law.This dependence in turn may acquire a new meaning in a context of an international labour market, a growing income gap, and an increasing dependence on the family for survival.This paper explores these contradictions, posing questions such as the following: How has this exception changed with the development of society? How has it historically been justified and which societal values does it mirror? How has the personal scope of the exception been defined and what effects does the exclusion have today for family members, both legally and practically? 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Herzfeld Olsson, Petra
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law.
    Johansson, Caroline
    Special Issue on the Role of the Social Partners in the Welfare State: Introduction2020In: International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations, ISSN 0952-617X, E-ISSN 1875-838X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 271-279Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf