Change search
Refine search result
1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Ceulemans, Tobias
    et al.
    Van Geel, Maarten
    Jacquemyn, Hans
    Boeraeve, Margaux
    Plue, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Saar, Liina
    Kasari, Liis
    Peeters, Gerrit
    van Acker, Kasper
    Crauwels, Sam
    Lievens, Bart
    Honnay, Olivier
    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in European grasslands under nutrient pollution2019In: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238, Vol. 28, no 12, p. 1796-1805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Our aim was to quantify the extent to which nutrient pollution explains arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal community richness and composition.

    Location: Europe.

    Time period: 2014-2016.

    Major taxa studied: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Methods: We sampled soils of calcareous and acidic grasslands and roots of 34 host plant species across a large geographical gradient of atmospheric nitrogen deposition and soil phosphorus availability. Furthermore, we performed an independent pairwise comparison between fertilized and unfertilized grasslands in Belgium and Iceland to compare results.

    Results: We found that nitrogen deposition had a significant negative relationship to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal richness, with a negative community threshold of 7.7 kg N/ha/year corresponding to the greatest reduction in operational taxonomic units. Additionally, we found that soil phosphorus had a significant negative relationship to mycorrhizal fungal richness.

    Main conclusions: Our results highlight the necessity to revisit the critical loads of atmospheric nitrogen deposition used in European environmental policy, currently set at 10-15 kg N/ha/year. Importantly, our observed threshold of 7.7 kg N/ha/year does not correspond to a critical load below which there is no environmental harm, because the least negative changes in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities were observed at < 5 kg N/ha/year. Therefore, to avoid compromising the policy tenet of no environmental harm with respect to grassland mycorrhizal fungi, areas of zero tolerance to nitrogen pollution should be delimited. Our results also indicate that environmental policy biased towards reducing nitrogen pollution alone will fail to preserve mycorrhizal biodiversity in European grasslands. We advocate increased policy attention to avoid phosphorus enrichment, particularly through agricultural fertilization. Here too, areas of zero phosphorus input, ideally set in the currently unpolluted (or least polluted) areas, seem key for effective environmental policy, because elevated levels of soil phosphorus after phosphorus fertilization are known to be extremely persistent.

  • 2. De Frenne, P
    et al.
    Kolb, A
    Verheyen, K
    Brunet, J
    Chabrerie, O
    Decocq, G
    Diekmann, M
    Eriksson, Ove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    Heinken, T
    Hermy, M
    Jögar, U
    Stanton, S
    Quataert, P
    Zindel, R
    Zobel, M
    Graae, B J
    Unraveling the effects of temperature, latitude and local environment on the reproduction of forest herbs.2009In: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238, Vol. 18, p. 641-651Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Dormann, Carsten F.
    et al.
    Bobrowski, Maria
    Dehling, D. Matthias
    Harris, David J.
    Hartig, Florian
    Lischke, Heike
    Moretti, Marco D.
    Pagel, Jörn
    Pinkert, Stefan
    Schleuning, Matthias
    Schmidt, Susanne I.
    Sheppard, Christine S.
    Steinbauer, Manuel J.
    Zeuss, Dirk
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Kraan, Casper
    Biotic interactions in species distribution modelling: 10 questions to guide interpretation and avoid false conclusions2018In: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238, Vol. 27, no 9, p. 1004-1016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Recent studies increasingly use statistical methods to infer biotic interactions from co‐occurrence information at a large spatial scale. However, disentangling biotic interactions from other factors that can affect co‐occurrence patterns at the macroscale is a major challenge.

    Approach: We present a set of questions that analysts and reviewers should ask to avoid erroneously attributing species association patterns to biotic interactions. Our questions relate to the appropriateness of data and models, the causality behind a correlative signal, and the problems associated with static data from dynamic systems. We summarize caveats reported by macroecological studies of biotic interactions and examine whether conclusions on the presence of biotic interactions are supported by the modelling approaches used.

    Findings: Irrespective of the method used, studies that set out to test for biotic interactions find statistical associations in species’ co‐occurrences. Yet, when compared with our list of questions, few purported interpretations of such associations as biotic interactions hold up to scrutiny. This does not dismiss the presence or importance of biotic interactions, but it highlights the risk of too lenient interpretation of the data. Combining model results with information from experiments and functional traits that are relevant for the biotic interaction of interest might strengthen conclusions.

    Main conclusions: Moving from species‐ to community‐level models, including biotic interactions among species, is of great importance for process‐based understanding and forecasting ecological responses. We hope that our questions will help to improve these models and facilitate the interpretation of their results. In essence, we conclude that ecologists have to recognize that a species association pattern in joint species distribution models will be driven not only by real biotic interactions, but also by shared habitat preferences, common migration history, phylogenetic history and shared response to missing environmental drivers, which specifically need to be discussed and, if possible, integrated into models.

  • 4. Dugo-Cota, Alvaro
    et al.
    Castroviejo-Fisher, Santiago
    Vila, Carles
    Gonzalez-Voyer, Alejandro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Estación Biológica de Doñana (EBD-CSIC), Spain; Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico.
    A test of the integrated evolutionary speed hypothesis in a Neotropical amphibian radiation2015In: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 804-813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim - The evolutionary speed hypothesis is a mechanistic explanation for the latitudinal biodiversity gradient. The recently extended integrated evolutionary speed hypothesis (IESH) proposes that temperature, water availability, population size and spatial heterogeneity influence the rate of molecular evolution which, in turn, affects diversification. However, the evidence for some of the associations predicted by the IESH is not conclusive, and in some cases is contradictory.

    Location - The Neotropics.

    Methods - Using a comparative Bayesian method we tested the following predictions of the IESH: the association between the rate of molecular evolution and temperature (and elevation and latitude, as proxies), water availability (using precipitation and relative humidity as proxies), productivity and rate of diversification. We also accounted for the potential confounding effects of body size and UVB radiation. We tested these predictions separately in mitochondrial and nuclear genes.

    Results - Substitution rates of mitochondrial and nuclear genes were positively associated with temperature and negatively with elevation, while only the mitochondrial coding gene rate was associated with UVB radiation. However, when controlling for temperature, the association between substitution rate and elevation and UVB radiation disappeared, while a negative association with precipitation emerged. Moreover, diversification events were positively correlated with the rate of molecular evolution but only in mitochondrial genes.

    Main conclusions - Our results support two key predictions of the IESH. They highlight the important association between rate of molecular evolution and temperature within a recently diverged group and also confirm the positive association between molecular evolution and diversification rate, although only in mitochondrial genes. However, the lack of association between diversification and temperature and the low effect size of the relationship between substitution rates and diversification in mitochondrial genes emphasize the important role other factors, such as time, spatial heterogeneity and population size might have in the origin and maintenance of the latitudinal biodiversity gradient.

  • 5. Lembrechts, Jonas J.
    et al.
    Lenoir, Jonathan
    Roth, Nina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Hattab, Tarek
    Milbau, Ann
    Haider, Sylvia
    Pellissier, Loïc
    Pauchard, Aníbal
    Backes, Amanda Ratier
    Dimarco, Romina D.
    Nuñez, Martin A.
    Aalto, Juha
    Nijs, Ivan
    Comparing temperature data sources for use in species distribution models: From in-situ logging to remote sensing2019In: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238, Vol. 28, no 11, p. 1578-1596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim Although species distribution models (SDMs) traditionally link species occurrences to free-air temperature data at coarse spatio-temporal resolution, the distribution of organisms might instead be driven by temperatures more proximal to their habitats. Several solutions are currently available, such as downscaled or interpolated coarse-grained free-air temperatures, satellite-measured land surface temperatures (LST) or in-situ-measured soil temperatures. A comprehensive comparison of temperature data sources and their performance in SDMs is, however, currently lacking. Location Northern Scandinavia. Time period 1970-2017. Major taxa studied Higher plants. Methods We evaluated different sources of temperature data (WorldClim, CHELSA, MODIS, E-OBS, topoclimate and soil temperature from miniature data loggers), differing in spatial resolution (from 1 '' to 0.1 degrees), measurement focus (free-air, ground-surface or soil temperature) and temporal extent (year-long versus long-term averages), and used them to fit SDMs for 50 plant species with different growth forms in a high-latitudinal mountain region. Results Differences between these temperature data sources originating from measurement focus and temporal extent overshadow the effects of temporal climatic differences and spatio-temporal resolution, with elevational lapse rates ranging from -0.6 degrees C per 100 m for long-term free-air temperature data to -0.2 degrees C per 100 m for in-situ soil temperatures. Most importantly, we found that the performance of the temperature data in SDMs depended on the growth forms of species. The use of in-situ soil temperatures improved the explanatory power of our SDMs (R-2 on average +16%), especially for forbs and graminoids (R-2 +24 and +21% on average, respectively) compared with the other data sources. Main conclusions We suggest that future studies using SDMs should use the temperature dataset that best reflects the ecology of the species, rather than automatically using coarse-grained data from WorldClim or CHELSA.

  • 6.
    Pasanen-Mortensen, Marianne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Pyykonen, Markku
    Elmhagen, Bodil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Where lynx prevail, foxes will fail - limitation of a mesopredator in Eurasia2013In: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 868-877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim Climate change and loss of apex predators can affect ecosystem structure and function through modified limitation processes. We investigated, on a continental scale, whether mesopredator abundance is limited from the top down by large predators, as predicted by the mesopredator release hypothesis, or by bottom-up factors. The mesopredator in focus is the red fox Vulpes vulpes, a key predator in many ecosystems due to its strong effects on prey abundance. Location Europe and northern Asia. Methods Data on red fox density were compiled from published papers and reports. For each site, we collated presence-absence data on large carnivores (Lynx lynx, Canis lupus, Canisaureus) and remote sensing data for factors potentially related to bottom-up limitation (winter severity, summer temperature, human density, primary productivity, tree cover). The data were analysed through structural equation modelling. Results The presence of lynx had a direct negative effect on red foxes, suppressing fox abundance. Also winter severity had a negative effect on red fox abundance, and in Eurasia as a whole this effect was partially mediated through lynx. Within the lynx distribution range, winter severity was the only bottom-up factor significantly affecting red fox abundance. Outside the lynx distribution range, primary productivity, summer temperature and human density had a positive effect on red fox abundance. Main conclusions Our results show that apex predators can limit mesopredator abundance on a continental scale, thus supporting the mesopredator release hypothesis. Winter severity also affected red fox abundance, partially due to an interaction between lynx and winter conditions. On the continental scale a complex network of processes operates with varying effects depending on mediation processes. Our results imply that apex predators can have an important effect on ecosystem structure by limiting mesopredator abundance, and we suggest that apex predators may dampen increases in mesopredator abundance driven by global warming.

  • 7.
    Plue, Jan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    De Frenne, Pieter
    Acharya, Kamal
    Brunet, Jorg
    Chabrerie, Olivier
    Decocq, Guillaume
    Diekmann, Martin
    Graae, Bente J.
    Heinken, Thilo
    Hermy, Martin
    Kolb, Annette
    Lemke, Isgard
    Liira, Jaan
    Naaf, Tobias
    Shevtsova, Anna
    Verheyen, Kris
    Wulf, Monika
    Cousins, Sara A. O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Climatic control of forest herb seed banks along a latitudinal gradient2013In: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 1106-1117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim Seed banks are central to the regeneration strategy of many plant species. Any factor altering seed bank density thus affects plant regeneration and population dynamics. Although seed banks are dynamic entities controlled by multiple environmental drivers, climatic factors are the most comprehensive, but still poorly understood. This study investigates how climatic variation structures seed production and resulting seed bank patterns. Location Temperate forests along a 1900km latitudinal gradient in north-western (NW) Europe. Methods Seed production and seed bank density were quantified in 153 plots along the gradient for four forest herbs with different seed longevity: Geum urbanum, Milium effusum, Poa nemoralis and Stachys sylvatica. We tested the importance of climatic and local environmental factors in shaping seed production and seed bank density. Results Seed production was determined by population size, and not by climatic factors. G.urbanum and M.effusum seed bank density declined with decreasing temperature (growing degree days) and/or increasing temperature range (maximum-minimum temperature). P.nemoralis and S.sylvatica seed bank density were limited by population size and not by climatic variables. Seed bank density was also influenced by other, local environmental factors such as soil pH or light availability. Different seed bank patterns emerged due to differential seed longevities. Species with long-lived seeds maintained constant seed bank densities by counteracting the reduced chance of regular years with high seed production at colder northern latitudes. Main conclusions Seed bank patterns show clear interspecific variation in response to climate across the distribution range. Not all seed banking species may be as well equipped to buffer climate change via their seed bank, notably in short-term persistent species. Since the buffering capacity of seed banks is key to species persistence, these results provide crucial information to advance climatic change predictions on range shifts, community and biodiversity responses.

  • 8.
    Thurner, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Beer, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Crowther, Thomas
    Falster, Daniel
    Manzoni, Stefano
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Prokushkin, Anatoly
    Schulze, Ernst-Detlef
    Sapwood biomass carbon in northern boreal and temperate forests2019In: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 640-660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim Information on the amount of carbon stored in the living tissue of tree stems (sapwood) is crucial for carbon and water cycle applications. Here, we aim to investigate sapwood-to-stem proportions and differences therein between tree genera and derive a sapwood biomass map. Location Northern Hemisphere boreal and temperate forests. Time period 2010. Major taxa studied Twenty-five common tree genera. Methods First, we develop a theoretical framework to estimate sapwood biomass for a given stem biomass by applying relationships between sapwood cross-sectional area (CSA) and stem CSA and between stem CSA and stem biomass. These measurements are extracted from a biomass and allometry database (BAAD), an extensive literature review and our own studies. The established allometric relationships are applied to a remote sensing-based stem biomass product in order to derive a spatially continuous sapwood biomass map. The application of new products on the distribution of stand density and tree genera facilitates the synergy of satellite and forest inventory data. Results Sapwood-to-stem CSA relationships can be modelled with moderate to very high modelling efficiency for different genera. The total estimated sapwood biomass equals 12.87 +/- 6.56 petagrams of carbon (PgC) in boreal (mean carbon density: 1.13 +/- 0.58 kgC m(-2)) and 15.80 +/- 9.10 PgC in temperate (2.03 +/- 1.17 kgC m(-2)) forests. Spatial patterns of sapwood-to-stem biomass proportions are crucially driven by the distribution of genera (spanning from 20-30% in Larix to > 70% in Pinus and Betula forests). Main conclusions The presented sapwood biomass map will be the basis for large-scale estimates of plant respiration and transpiration. The enormous spatial differences in sapwood biomass proportions reveal the need to consider the functionally more important sapwood instead of the entire stem biomass in global carbon and water cycle studies. Alterations in tree species distribution, induced by forest management or climate change, can strongly affect the available sapwood biomass even if stem biomass remains unchanged.

  • 9. Thurner, Martin
    et al.
    Beer, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Santoro, Maurizio
    Carvalhais, Nuno
    Wutzler, Thomas
    Schepaschenko, Dmitry
    Shvidenko, Anatoly
    Kompter, Elisabeth
    Ahrens, Bernhard
    Levick, Shaun R.
    Schmullius, Christiane
    Carbon stock and density of northern boreal and temperate forests2014In: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 297-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimTo infer a forest carbon density map at 0.01 degrees resolution from a radar remote sensing product for the estimation of carbon stocks in Northern Hemisphere boreal and temperate forests. LocationThe study area extends from 30 degrees N to 80 degrees N, covering three forest biomes - temperate broadleaf and mixed forests (TBMF), temperate conifer forests (TCF) and boreal forests (BFT) - over three continents (North America, Europe and Asia). MethodsThis study is based on a recently available growing stock volume (GSV) product retrieved from synthetic aperture radar data. Forest biomass and spatially explicit uncertainty estimates were derived from the GSV using existing databases of wood density and allometric relationships between biomass compartments (stem, branches, roots, foliage). We tested the resultant map against inventory-based biomass data from Russia, Europe and the USA prior to making intercontinent and interbiome carbon stock comparisons. ResultsOur derived carbon density map agrees well with inventory data at regional scales (r(2)=0.70-0.90). While 40.715.7 petagram of carbon (PgC) are stored in BFT, TBMF and TCF contain 24.5 +/- 9.4PgC and 14.5 +/- 4.8 PgC, respectively. In terms of carbon density, we found 6.21 +/- 2.07kgC m(-2) retained in TCF and 5.80 +/- 2.21kgC m(-2) in TBMF, whereas BFT have a mean carbon density of 4.00 +/- 1.54kgC m(-2). Indications of a higher carbon density in Europe compared with the other continents across each of the three biomes could not be proved to be significant. Main conclusionsThe presented carbon density and corresponding uncertainty map give an insight into the spatial patterns of biomass and stand as a new benchmark to improve carbon cycle models and carbon monitoring systems. In total, we found 79.8 +/- 29.9PgC stored in northern boreal and temperate forests, with Asian BFT accounting for 22.1 +/- 8.3PgC.

  • 10. Valdés, Alicia
    et al.
    Lenoir, Jonathan
    Gallet-Moron, Emilie
    Andrieu, Emilie
    Brunet, Jörg
    Chabrerie, Olivier
    Closset-Kopp, Déborah
    Cousins, Sara A. O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Deconchat, Marc
    De Frenne, Pieter
    De Smedt, Pallieter
    Diekmann, Martin
    Hansen, Karin
    Hermy, Martin
    Kolb, Annette
    Liira, Jaan
    Lindgren, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Naaf, Tobias
    Paal, Taavi
    Prokofieva, Irina
    Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael
    Wulf, Monika
    Verheyen, Kris
    Decocq, Guillaume
    The contribution of patch-scale conditions is greater than that of macroclimate in explaining local plant diversity in fragmented forests across Europe2015In: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 1094-1105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimMacroclimate is a major determinant of large-scale diversity patterns. However, the influence of smaller-scale factors on local diversity across large spatial extents is not well documented. Here, we quantify the relative importance of local (patch-scale), landscape-scale and macroclimatic drivers of herbaceous species diversity in small forest patches in agricultural landscapes across Europe. LocationDeciduous forest patches in eight regions along a macroclimatic gradient from southern France to central Sweden and Estonia. MethodsThe diversity of forest specialists and generalists at three levels (whole forest patch, sampling plots within patches and between scales) was related to patch-scale (forest area, age, abiotic and biotic heterogeneity), landscape-scale (amount of forest, grasslands and hedgerows around the patch, patch isolation) and macroclimatic variables (temperature and precipitation) using generalized linear mixed models and variation partitioning for each group of variables. ResultsThe total amount of explained variation in diversity ranged from 8% for plot-scale diversity of generalists to 54% for patch-scale diversity of forest specialists. Patch-scale variables always explained more than 60% of the explained variation in diversity, mainly due to the positive effect of within-patch heterogeneity on patch-scale and between-scale diversities and to the positive effect of patch age on plot-scale diversity of forest specialists. Landscape-scale variables mainly contributed to the amount of explained variation in plot-scale diversity, being more important for forest specialists (21%) than for generalists (18%). Macroclimatic variables contributed a maximum of 11% to the plot-scale diversity of generalists. Main conclusionsMacroclimate poorly predicts local diversity across Europe, and herbaceous diversity is mainly explained by habitat features, less so by landscape structure. We show the importance of conserving old forest patches as refugia for typical forest species, and of enhancing the landscape context around the patches by reducing the degree of disturbance caused by agriculture.

  • 11. Wasof, Safaa
    et al.
    Lenoir, Jonathan
    Aarrestad, Per Arild
    Alsos, Inger Greve
    Armbruster, W. Scott
    Austrheim, Gunnar
    Bakkestuen, Vegar
    Birks, H. John B.
    Bråthen, Kari Anne
    Broennimann, Olivier
    Brunet, Jörg
    Bruun, Hans Henrik
    Dahlberg, Carl Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Diekmann, Martin
    Dullinger, Stefan
    Dynesius, Mats
    Ejrnaes, Rasmus
    Gegout, Jean-Claude
    Graae, Bente Jessen
    Grytnes, John-Arvid
    Guisan, Antoine
    Hylander, Kristoffer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Jonsdottir, Ingibjörg S.
    Kapfer, Jutta
    Klanderud, Kari
    Luoto, Miska
    Milbau, Ann
    Moora, Mari
    Nygaard, Bettina
    Odland, Arvid
    Pauli, Harald
    Ravolainen, Virve
    Reinhardt, Stefanie
    Sandvik, Sylvi Marlen
    Schei, Fride Hoistad
    Speed, James D. M.
    Svenning, Jens-Christian
    Thuiller, Wilfried
    Tveraabak, Liv Unn
    Vandvik, Vigdis
    Velle, Liv Guri
    Virtanen, Risto
    Vittoz, Pascal
    Willner, Wolfgang
    Wohlgemuth, Thomas
    Zimmermann, Niklaus E.
    Zobel, Martin
    Decocq, Guillaume
    Disjunct populations of European vascular plant species keep the same climatic niches2015In: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238, Vol. 24, no 12, p. 1401-1412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim Previous research on how climatic niches vary across species ranges has focused on a limited number of species, mostly invasive, and has not, to date, been very conclusive. Here we assess the degree of niche conservatism between distant populations of native alpine plant species that have been separated for thousands of years. Location European Alps and Fennoscandia. Methods Of the studied pool of 888 terrestrial vascular plant species occurring in both the Alps and Fennoscandia, we used two complementary approaches to test and quantify climatic-niche shifts for 31 species having strictly disjunct populations and 358 species having either a contiguous or a patchy distribution with distant populations. First, we used species distribution modelling to test for a region effect on each species' climatic niche. Second, we quantified niche overlap and shifts in niche width (i.e. ecological amplitude) and position (i.e. ecological optimum) within a bi-dimensional climatic space. Results Only one species (3%) of the 31 species with strictly disjunct populations and 58 species (16%) of the 358 species with distant populations showed a region effect on their climatic niche. Niche overlap was higher for species with strictly disjunct populations than for species with distant populations and highest for arctic-alpine species. Climatic niches were, on average, wider and located towards warmer and wetter conditions in the Alps. Main conclusion Climatic niches seem to be generally conserved between populations that are separated between the Alps and Fennoscandia and have probably been so for 10,000-15,000 years. Therefore, the basic assumption of species distribution models that a species' climatic niche is constant in space and time-at least on time scales 104 years or less-seems to be largely valid for arctic-alpine plants.

  • 12. Wasof, Safaa
    et al.
    Lenoir, Jonathan
    Gallet-Moron, Emilie
    Jamoneau, Aurelien
    Brunet, Jorg
    Cousins, Sara A. O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    De Frenne, Pieter
    Diekmann, Martin
    Hermy, Martin
    Kolb, Annette
    Liira, Jaan
    Verheyen, Kris
    Wulf, Monika
    Decocq, Guillaume
    Ecological niche shifts of understorey plants along a latitudinal gradient of temperate forests in north-western Europe2013In: Global Ecology and Biogeography, ISSN 1466-822X, E-ISSN 1466-8238, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 1130-1140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim In response to environmental changes and to avoid extinction, species may either track suitable environmental conditions or adapt to the modified environment. However, whether and how species adapt to environmental changes remains unclear. By focusing on the realized niche (i.e. the actual space that a species inhabits and the resources it can access as a result of limiting biotic factors present in its habitat), we here examine shifts in the realized-niche width (i.e. ecological amplitude) and position (i.e. ecological optimum) of 26 common and widespread forest understorey plants across their distributional ranges. Location Temperate forests along a ca. 1800-km-long latitudinal gradient from northern France to central Sweden and Estonia. Methods We derived species' realized-niche width from a -diversity metric, which increases if the focal species co-occurs with more species. Based on the concept that species' scores in a detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) represent the locations of their realized-niche positions, we developed a novel approach to run species-specific DCAs allowing the focal species to shift its realized-niche position along the studied latitudinal gradient while the realized-niche positions of other species were held constant. Results None of the 26 species maintained both their realized-niche width and position along the latitudinal gradient. Few species (9 of 26: 35%) shifted their realized-niche width, but all shifted their realized-niche position. With increasing latitude, most species (22 of 26: 85%) shifted their realized-niche position for soil nutrients and pH towards nutrient-poorer and more acidic soils. Main conclusions Forest understorey plants shifted their realized niche along the latitudinal gradient, suggesting local adaptation and/or plasticity. This macroecological pattern casts doubt on the idea that the realized niche is stable in space and time, which is a key assumption of species distribution models used to predict the future of biodiversity, hence raising concern about predicted extinction rates.

1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf