Change search
Refine search result
1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alm Bergvall, Ulrika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Svensson, Lisa
    Kjellander, Petter
    Vigilance adjustments in relation to long- and short term risk in wild fallow deer (Dama dama)2016In: Behavioural Processes, ISSN 0376-6357, E-ISSN 1872-8308, Vol. 128, p. 58-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The risk allocation hypothesis predicts that vigilance should be adjusted to the temporal variation in risk. We test this hypothesis in wild fallow deer exposed to short term (disturbance) and long term (presence of a fawn after parturition) changes in risk. We recorded the proportion, frequency and type of vigilance and size of used area before and after parturition, in GPS-collared wild female fallow deer. Vigilance was divided in two main groups: non-grazing vigilance and grazing vigilance. The latter group was divided into grazing vigilance while chewing and a grazing vigilance when chewing was interrupted. By recording external disturbance in form of passing cars, we were able to investigate if this altered the amount, and type of vigilance. We found that females increased the proportion and frequency of grazing vigilance stop chewing after parturition. The grazing vigilance chewing was unaffected, but non-grazing vigilance decreased. Disturbance increased the proportion grazing vigilance stop chewing to the same extent before and after parturition. We found a clear decrease in female home range size after parturition as a possible behavioural adjustment. The increase in grazing vigilance stop chewing after parturition is a rarely described but expected cost of reproduction.

  • 2.
    Bergvall, Ulrika A
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Development of feeding selectivity and consistency in food choice over5 years in fallow deer2009In: Behavioural Processes, ISSN 0376-6357, E-ISSN 1872-8308, Vol. 80, p. 140-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to better understand the development and maintenance of feeding selectivity, several feedingexperimentswere performed with fallowdeer (Damadama L.). In experiments performed when the fawnswere between tenand 27 days old, itwas found that all fawnsshowedpreferences for sucrose but aversionstowards tannic acid and ascorbic acid.However, differences in selectivity towards tannic acidwere presentalready before the fawns became functional ruminants and these individual differences lasted 5 years.Moreover, individuals that ingested overall less tannic acid, searched more thoroughly between foodsources. When the foraging behaviour was compared with age (11–41 days old and 65–97 days old), itwas found that the time a fawn spent eating, increased with age, and the time spent on exploration,smelling and tasting plants decreased with age. Furthermore, the fawns increased their intake of grassand herbs, while the intake of soil and dead plant material decreased with age.

  • 3.
    Haage, Marianne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Bergvall, Ulrika A.
    Maran, Tiit
    Kiik, Kairi
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Situation and context impacts the expression of personality: The influence of breeding season and test context2013In: Behavioural Processes, ISSN 0376-6357, E-ISSN 1872-8308, Vol. 100, p. 103-109Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Hagman, Mattias
    et al.
    University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Löwenborg, Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Shine, Richard
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Determinants of anti-predator tactics in hatchling grass snakes (Natrix natrix)2015In: Behavioural Processes, ISSN 0376-6357, E-ISSN 1872-8308, Vol. 113, p. 60-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many organisms exhibit diverse anti-predator tactics, influenced by genetics and prior experience. In ectothermic taxa, offspring phenotypes are often sensitive to developmental temperatures. If the effectiveness of alternative anti-predator responses depends on thermally sensitive traits, then the temperatures experienced during embryonic life should also affect how offspring respond to an approaching predator. We incubated 16 clutches of Swedish grass snakes (Natrix natrix) at a range of developmental temperatures, and scored body size, colour pattern, locomotor performance and anti-predator responses of 213 hatchlings from those clutches. A hatchling snake’s size and locomotor abilities were affected by its clutch of origin, its developmental temperature, and by an interaction between these two factors. Anti-predator tactics were strongly linked to locomotor ability, such that slower snakes tended to rely upon aggressive displays rather than flight. Incubation temperatures that generated slow (and thus aggressive) snakes also modified the colour of the snake’s nuchal spot. Temperatures in the low to medium range generated mostly cream, white and orange spots, whereas medium to high temperatures generated more yellow spots. Incubation effects, and gene X environment interactions, thus may generate complex correlations between morphology, locomotor ability, and anti-predator tactics.

  • 5.
    Kotrschal, Alexander
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Szorkovszky, Alexander
    Romenskyy, Maksym
    Perna, Andrea
    Buechel, Severine D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Zeng, Hong-Li
    Pelckmans, Kristiaan
    Sumpter, David
    Kolm, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Brain size does not impact shoaling dynamics in unfamiliar groups of guppies (Poecilia reticulata)2018In: Behavioural Processes, ISSN 0376-6357, E-ISSN 1872-8308, Vol. 147, p. 13-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collective movement is achieved when individuals adopt local rules to interact with their neighbours. How the brain processes information about neighbours' positions and movements may affect how individuals interact in groups. As brain size can determine such information processing it should impact collective animal movement. Here we investigate whether brain size affects the structure and organisation of newly forming fish shoals by quantifying the collective movement of guppies (Poecilia reticulata) from large- and small-brained selection lines, with known differences in learning and memory. We used automated tracking software to determine shoaling behaviour of single-sex groups of eight or two fish and found no evidence that brain size affected the speed, group size, or spatial and directional organisation of fish shoals. Our results suggest that brain size does not play an important role in how fish interact with each other in these types of moving groups of unfamiliar individuals. Based on these results, we propose that shoal dynamics are likely to be governed by relatively basic cognitive processes that do not differ in these brain size selected lines of guppies.

  • 6.
    Lind, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Enquist, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Ghirlanda, Stefano
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution. Brooklyn College, USA.
    Animal memory: A review of delayed matching-to-sample data2015In: Behavioural Processes, ISSN 0376-6357, E-ISSN 1872-8308, Vol. 117, p. 52-58Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We performed a meta-analysis of over 90 data sets from delayed matching-to-sample (DMTS) studies with 25 species (birds, mammals, and bees). In DMTS, a sample stimulus is first presented and then removed. After a delay, two (or more) comparison stimuli are presented, and the subject is rewarded for choosing the one matching the sample. We used data on performance vs. delay length to estimate two parameters informative of working memory abilities: the maximum performance possible with no delay (comparison stimuli presented as soon as the sample is removed), and the rate of performance decay as the delay is lengthened (related to memory span). We conclude that there is little evidence that zero-delay performance varies between these species. There is evidence that pigeons do not perform as well as mammals at longer delay intervals. Pigeons, however, are the only extensively studied bird, and we cannot exclude that other birds may be able to bridge as long a delay as mammals. Extensive training may improve memory, although the data are open to other interpretations. Overall, DMTS studies suggest memory spans ranging from a few seconds to several minutes. We suggest that observations of animals exhibiting much longer memory spans (days to months) can be explained in terms of specialized memory systems that deal with specific, biologically significant information, such as food caches. Events that do not trigger these systems, on the other hand, appear to be remembered for only a short time. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: In Honor of jeriy Hogan.

  • 7. Mendoza, Janelle
    et al.
    Ghirlanda, Stefano
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for Cultural Evolution. CUNY Graduate Center, USA; Brooklyn College, USA.
    Modeling relational responding with artificial neural networks2023In: Behavioural Processes, ISSN 0376-6357, E-ISSN 1872-8308, Vol. 205, article id 104816Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relational responding refers to behavior that conforms to a rule for com- paring stimuli. Lazareva et al. (2014) trained pigeons to choose either the smaller or the larger of two circles, using 1–3 pairs of circles for training and 17–19 new pairs for testing. The pigeons showed relational responding on some test pairs and systematic failures on others. We present a simple artificial neural network model that reproduces the animals’ behavior well, similarly to Lazareva et al.’s (2014) statistical model based on stimulus features and stimulus relationships. We analyze how the network model gener- alizes from training to test stimuli, and show that it can reconcile contrasting ideas about relational responding from the seminal works by Köhler (1929, 1918/1938, 1924), positing that animals can learn relational rules such as “choose the larger stimulus,” and Spence (1937), positing that relational re- sponding can be explained based on stimulus generalization.

  • 8. Vinken, Vera
    et al.
    Lidfors, Lena
    Loberg, Jenny
    Lundberg, Anna
    Lind, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Centre for Cultural Evolution.
    Jonsson, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Centre for Cultural Evolution.
    Ghirlanda, Stefano
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Centre for Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Enquist, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Centre for Cultural Evolution.
    Models of conditioned reinforcement and abnormal behaviour in captive animals2023In: Behavioural Processes, ISSN 0376-6357, E-ISSN 1872-8308, Vol. 210, article id 104893Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abnormal behaviours are common in captive animals, and despite a lot of research, the development, maintenance and alleviation of these behaviours are not fully understood. Here, we suggest that conditioned reinforcement can induce sequential dependencies in behaviour that are difficult to infer from direct observation. We develop this hypothesis using recent models of associative learning that include conditioned reinforcement and inborn facets of behaviour, such as predisposed responses and motivational systems. We explore three scenarios in which abnormal behaviour emerges from a combination of associative learning and a mismatch between the captive environment and inborn predispositions. The first model considers how abnormal behaviours, such as locomotor stereotypies, may arise from certain spatial locations acquiring conditioned reinforcement value. The second model shows that conditioned reinforcement can give rise to abnormal behaviour in response to stimuli that regularly precede food or other reinforcers. The third model shows that abnormal behaviour can result from motivational systems being adapted to natural environments that have different temporal structures than the captive environment. We conclude that models including conditioned reinforcement offer an important theoretical insight regarding the complex relationships between captive environments, inborn predispositions, and learning. In the future, this general framework could allow us to further understand and possibly alleviate abnormal behaviours.

  • 9.
    Wergård, Eva-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Karolinska institutet, Sweden.
    Temrin, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Forkman, Björn
    Spångberg, Mats
    Fredlund, Hélène
    Westlund, Karolina
    Training pair-housed Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) using a combination of negative and positive reinforcement2015In: Behavioural Processes, ISSN 0376-6357, E-ISSN 1872-8308, Vol. 113, p. 51-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When training animals, time is sometimes a limiting factor hampering the use of positive reinforcement training (PRT) exclusively. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a combination of negative and positive reinforcement training (NPRT). Twenty naïve female Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were trained in 30 sessions with either PRT (n = 8) or NPRT (n = 12) to respond to a signal, move into a selected cage section and accept confinement. In the NPRT-group a signal preceded the presentation of one or several novel, and thus aversive, stimuli. When the correct behaviour was performed, the novel stimulus was removed and treats were given. As the animal learned to perform the correct behaviour, the use of novel stimuli was decreased and finally phased out completely. None of the PRT-trained animals finished the task. Ten out of 12 monkeys in the NPRT-group succeeded to perform the task within the 30 training sessions, a significant difference from the PRT-group (p = 0.0007). A modified approach test showed no significant difference between the groups (p = 0.67) in how they reacted to the trainer. The results from this study suggest that carefully conducted NPRT can be an alternative training method to consider, especially when under a time constraint.

  • 10. Zidar, Josefina
    et al.
    Sorato, Enrico
    Malmqvist, Ann-Marie
    Jansson, Emelie
    Rosher, Charlotte
    Jensen, Per
    Favati, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Løvlie, Hanne
    Early experience affects adult personality in the red junglefowl: A role for cognitive stimulation?2017In: Behavioural Processes, ISSN 0376-6357, E-ISSN 1872-8308, Vol. 134, p. 78-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite intense research efforts, biologists are still puzzled by the existence of animal personality. While recent studies support a link between cognition and personality, the directionality of this relationship still needs to be clarified. Early-life experiences can affect adult behaviour, and among these, cognitive stimulation has been suggested theoretically to influence personality. Yet, the influence of early cognitive stimulation has rarely been explored in empirical investigations of animal behaviour and personality. We investigated the effect of early cognitive stimulation on adult personality in the red junglefowl (Gallus gallus). To this end, we assessed adult behaviour across a number of personality assays and compared behaviour of individuals previously exposed to a series of learning tasks as chicks, with that of control individuals lacking this experience. We found that individuals exposed to early stimulation were, as adults, more vigilant and performed fewer escape attempts in personality assays. Other behaviours describing personality traits in the fowl were not affected. We conclude that our results support the hypothesis that early stimulation can affect aspects of adult behaviour and personality, suggesting a hitherto underappreciated causality link between cognition and personality. Future research should aim to confirm these findings and resolve their underlying dynamics and proximate mechanisms.

1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf