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  • 1. Battu, Harminder
    et al.
    Zenou, Yves
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    OPPOSITIONAL IDENTITIES AND EMPLOYMENT FOR ETHNIC MINORITIES: EVIDENCE FROM ENGLAND2010In: Economic Journal, ISSN 0013-0133, E-ISSN 1468-0297, Vol. 120, no 542, p. f52-F71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Where a community or group is socially excluded from a dominant group, some individuals of that group may identify with the dominant culture and others may reject that culture. The aim of this article is to investigate this issue by empirically analysing the potential trade-off for ethnic minorities between sticking to their own roots and labour market success. We find that the social environment of individuals and attachments to culture of origin has a strong association with identity choice. Our results also suggest that those non-whites who have preferences that accord with being 'oppositional' do experience an employment penalty.

  • 2.
    Björklund, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nybom, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). The Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU), Sweden.
    The Contribution of Early-life Versus Labour Market Factors to Intergenerational Income Persistence: A Comparison of the UK and Sweden2017In: Economic Journal, ISSN 0013-0133, E-ISSN 1468-0297, Vol. 127, p. F71-F94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explore whether differences in intergenerational income mobility between the UK and Sweden show up early in life, finding stronger associations between parental income and birthweight, height and school performance in the UK. We investigate whether these differentials can account for the country difference in income mobility. While differences in the associations in birthweight and height are too weak to matter, school performance does account for a substantial part of this difference. However, country differences in the earnings returns to these skills are at least as important as the differences in the link between parental income and skills.

  • 3.
    de Quidt, Jonathan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Fetzer, Thiemo
    Ghatak, Maitreesh
    Market Structure and Borrower Welfare in Microfinance2018In: Economic Journal, ISSN 0013-0133, E-ISSN 1468-0297, Vol. 128, no 610, p. 1019-1046Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivated by recent controversies surrounding the role of commercial lenders in microfinance, and calls for regulation of the sector, we analyse borrower welfare under different market structures, considering a benevolent non-profit lender, a for-profit monopolist and a competitive credit market. To understand the magnitude of the effects analysed, we simulate the model with parameters estimated from the MIX Market database. Our results suggest that market power can have severe implications for borrower welfare, while despite possible enforcement externalities competition typically delivers similar borrower welfare to non-profit lending.

  • 4. Engström, Per
    et al.
    Hägglund, Pathric
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). The Swedish Social Insurance Inspectorate (ISF), Sweden.
    Johansson, Per
    Early Interventions and Disability Insurance: Experience from a Field Experiment2017In: Economic Journal, ISSN 0013-0133, E-ISSN 1468-0297, Vol. 127, p. 363-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We estimate the effects of early assessments of an individual's need for vocational rehabilitation in the Swedish sickness insurance system using a field experiment. One of the interventions increases the flow to disability benefits by 20%. The effect is larger for unemployed individuals, who also are covered by the sickness insurance scheme. This result is in line with a theoretical model with moral hazard and asymmetric information in which individuals with low work incentives communicate worse health in response to the assessment for rehabilitation which then increases the hazard to disability benefits.

  • 5. Folke, Olle
    et al.
    Persson, Torsten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies. CIFAR, Canada.
    Rickne, Johanna
    Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN), Sweden.
    Dynastic Political Rents? Economic Rents to Relatives of Top Politicians2017In: Economic Journal, ISSN 0013-0133, E-ISSN 1468-0297, Vol. 127, p. F495-F517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We exploit close elections in Swedish municipalities to test whether relatives of politicians who become mayors obtain economic benefits. We find no benefits for the siblings of new mayors, but the average earnings of children of newly appointed mayors rise by about 15%. Administrative information on occupational and residence status show that the higher earnings are unlikely reflect an illegitimate allocation of jobs. But the evidence suggests that children of election-winning mayors are more likely to postpone tertiary education and remain in their parents' municipality to work.

  • 6.
    Fredriksson, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU), Sweden; Uppsala Centre for Labour Studies (UCLS), Sweden; Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), Germany.
    Öckert, Bjorn
    LIFE-CYCLE EFFECTS OF AGE AT SCHOOL START2014In: Economic Journal, ISSN 0013-0133, E-ISSN 1468-0297, Vol. 124, no 579, p. 977-1004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, children typically start school the year they turn seven. We combine this school entry cutoff with individuals' birthdates to estimate effects of school starting age (SSA) on educational attainment and long-run labour market outcomes. We find that school entry age raises educational attainment and show that postponing tracking until age 16 reduces the effect of SSA on educational attainment. On average, SSA only affects the allocation of labour supply over the life-cycle and leaves prime-age earnings unaffected. But for individuals with low-educated parents, we find that prime-age earnings increase in response to age at school start.

  • 7.
    Golsteyn, Bart H. H.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Maastricht University, The Netherlands.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Lindahl, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Adolescent time preferences predict lifetime outcomes2014In: Economic Journal, ISSN 0013-0133, E-ISSN 1468-0297, Vol. 124, no 580, p. F739-F761Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the relationship between time preferences and lifetime social and economic outcomes. We use a Swedish longitudinal data set that links information from a large survey on children's time preferences at age 13 to administrative registers spanning over five decades. Our results indicate a substantial adverse relationship between high discount rates and school performance, health, labour supply and lifetime income. Males and high-ability children gain significantly more from being future oriented. These discrepancies are largest regarding outcomes later in life. We also show that the relationship between time preferences and long-run outcomes operates through early human capital investments.

  • 8. Hjalmarsson, Randi
    et al.
    Holmlund, Helena
    Lindquist, Matthew J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    The Effect of Education on Criminal Convictions and Incarceration: Causal Evidence from Micro-data2015In: Economic Journal, ISSN 0013-0133, E-ISSN 1468-0297, Vol. 125, no 587, p. 1290-1326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article studies the causal effect of educational attainment on conviction and incarceration using Sweden's compulsory schooling reform as an instrument for years of schooling and a 70% sample from Sweden's Multigenerational Register matched with more than 30years of administrative crime records. We find a significant negative effect of schooling on male convictions and incarceration; one additional year of schooling decreases the likelihood of conviction by 6.7% and incarceration by 15.5%. Though OLS estimates for females are of a similar magnitude to those for males, we find no evidence of a significant causal effect for women.

  • 9.
    Jia, Ruixue
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    WEATHER SHOCKS, SWEET POTATOES AND PEASANT REVOLTS IN HISTORICAL CHINA2014In: Economic Journal, ISSN 0013-0133, E-ISSN 1468-0297, Vol. 124, no 575, p. 92-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I use data covering 267 prefectures over four centuries to investigate two questions about historical China. To what extent did weather shocks cause civil conflict? And to what extent did the historical introduction of (drought resistant) sweet potatoes mitigate these effects? I find that before the introduction of sweet potatoes, exceptional droughts increased the probability of peasant revolts by around 0.7 percentage points, which translates into a revolt probability in drought years that is more than twice the average revolt probability. After the introduction of sweet potatoes, exceptional droughts only increased the probability of peasant revolts by around 0.2 percentage points.

  • 10.
    Jia, Ruixue
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Weather Shocks, Sweet Potatoes and Peasant Revolts in Historical ChinaIn: Economic Journal, ISSN 0013-0133, E-ISSN 1468-0297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I use data covering 267 prefectures over four centuries to investigate two questions about historical China. To what extent did weather shocks cause civil conflict? And to what extent did the historical introduction of (drought-resistant) sweet potatoes mitigate these effects? I find that before the introduction of sweet potatoes, exceptional droughts increased the probability of peasant revolts by around 0.7 percentage points, which translates into a revolt probability in drought years that is more than twice the average revolt probability. After the introduction of sweet potatoes, exceptional droughts only increased the probability of peasant revolts by around 0.2 percentage points.

  • 11.
    Priks, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    The Effects of Surveillance Cameras on Crime: Evidence from the Stockholm Subway2015In: Economic Journal, ISSN 0013-0133, E-ISSN 1468-0297, Vol. 125, no 588, p. F289-F305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I study the effects of surveillance cameras on crime in the Stockholm subway system. Beginning in 2006, surveillance cameras were installed in subway stations at different points in time. Difference-in-difference analysis reveals that introduction of the cameras reduced crime by approximately 25% at stations in the city centre. The types of crimes deterred by cameras are planned crime, that is, pickpocketing and robbery. It is also shown that some of the crimes were displaced to surrounding areas. The cost of preventing one crime by the use of surveillance cameras is approximately US$ 2,000.

  • 12.
    Sandberg, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Competing Identities: A Field Study of In‐group Bias Among Professional Evaluators2018In: Economic Journal, ISSN 0013-0133, E-ISSN 1468-0297, Vol. 128, no 613, p. 2131-2159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I use data from the Olympic sport of dressage to explore in‐group biases among judges. Dressage – the only international sport with subjective performance evaluations in which men and women compete as equals – provides a rare opportunity to identify multiple in‐group biases in the same naturally occurring setting. While, on average, judges are not biased in favour of either gender, they exhibit substantial biases in favour of (i) athletes of their own nationality, and (ii) athletes of the same nationality as the other judges in the competition. Heterogeneity across competitions suggests that biases increase as group identity becomes more salient.

  • 13.
    Säve-Söderbergh, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sjögren Lindquist, Gabriella
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Children Do Not Behave Like Adults: Gender Gaps In Performance And Risk Taking In A Random Social Context In The High-Stakes Game Shows Jeopardy and Junior Jeopardy2017In: Economic Journal, ISSN 0013-0133, E-ISSN 1468-0297, Vol. 127, no 603, p. 1665-1692Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using unique panel data, we compare the cognitive performance and wagering behaviour of children (10-11 years) with that of adults playing the Swedish version of the TV shows Jeopardy and Junior Jeopardy. Although facing the same well known high-stakes game, and controlling for performance differences, there is no gender gap in risk taking between girls and boys in contrast to adults; while girls assume more risk than women, boys assume less risk than men. We also find that female behaviour is differently sensitive to social context. Whereas women wager less, girls perform worse and employ inferior wagering strategies when randomly assigned to male opponents.

1 - 13 of 13
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