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  • 1.
    Alexius, Annika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Sellin, Peter
    Exchange Rates and Long-Term Bonds2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 114, no 3, p. 974-990Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is tentative evidence to suggest that the well-documented empirical failure of uncovered interest parity (UIP) is confined to short-term interest rates. However, tests of UIP for long-term bonds are thwarted by various data problems. These data problems can be avoided by focusing on short investments in long-term bonds. This paper concerns the relationship between changes in the US dollar-Deutsche Mark exchange rate and returns to short investments in US and German long-term government bonds. The hypothesis that expected returns to investments in bonds denominated in the two currencies are equal is not rejected, and the estimated slope coefficients are positive. For corresponding short-term interest rates, the typical finding of negative and large Fama coefficients is confirmed. We conclude that it is the maturity of the asset, rather than the investment horizon, that matters for the results.

  • 2.
    Alexius, Annika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Sellin, Peter
    Exchange Rates and Long-term BondsIn: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

     

     

    Tentative evidence suggests that the empirical failure of uncovered

    interest parity (UIP) is con

     

    fi

    ned to short-term interest rates. Tests of

    UIP for long-term interest rates are however hampered by various data

    problems. By focusing on short investments in long-term bonds, these

    data problems can be avoided. We study the relationship between the

    US dollar - Deutsch Mark exchange rate and German and American

    bond rates. The hypothesis that expected returns to investments in

    bonds denominated in the two currencies are equal cannot be rejected.

    This result is not simply due to low power as the

     

    β−coeffi

    cients are

    close to unity. For the corresponding short-term interest rates, the

    typical

     

    finding of a large and significantly negative β−coeffi

    cient is

    con

    firmed.

  • 3.
    Almås, Ingvild
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Kjelsrud, Anders
    Somanathan, Rohini
    A Behavior-Based Approach to the Estimation of Poverty in India2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 121, no 1, p. 182-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estimates of poverty in India are crucial inputs for the understanding of world poverty, yet there is much disagreement about the numbers and the legitimacy of methods used to derive them. In this paper, we propose and justify an alternative approach to identify the poor, which uses the proportion of income spent on food. Our estimates have weaker data requirements than official methods, and they compare favorably with several validation tests. Most notably, households around our state poverty lines obtain their calories from similar sources, whereas this is not true of official poverty lines. We also find that rates of self-reported hunger are higher in states that we classify as poor.

  • 4.
    Andersson Joona, Pernilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nekby, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Intensive coaching of new immigrants: an evaluation based on random program assignment2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 114, no 2, p. 575-600Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether intensive counseling and coaching by Public Employment Service (PES) caseworkers improves the employment opportunities of new immigrants in Sweden. This is tested within the framework of introduction programs for new immigrants. A trial introduction program was implemented from October 2006 to June 2008. Within participating municipalities, new immigrants were randomly assigned into treatment (intensive coaching) or control (regular introduction programs). The results indicate that there are significant treatment effects on employment probabilities as well as on participation in intermediate PES training programs.

  • 5. Bratberg, Espen
    et al.
    Davis, Jonathan
    Mazumder, Bhashkar
    Nybom, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Schnitzlein, Daniel D.
    Vaage, Kjell
    A Comparison of Intergenerational Mobility Curves in Germany, Norway, Sweden, and the US2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 119, no 1, p. 72-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine intergenerational mobility differences between Germany, Norway, Sweden, and the US. Using ranks, we find that the US is substantially less intergenerationally mobile than the three European countries and that the most mobile region of the US is less mobile than the least mobile regions of Norway and Sweden. Using a linear estimator of income share mobility, we find that the four countries have very similar rates of intergenerational mobility. However, when we use non-parametric versions of rank and income share mobility, we find that the US tends to experience lower upward mobility at the bottom of the income distribution than Norway and Sweden.

  • 6.
    Buhai, I. Sebastian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Cottini, Elena
    Westergaard-Nielsen, Niels
    How Productive Is Workplace Health and Safety?2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 119, no 4, p. 1086-1104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we investigate the causal impact of workplace health and safety practices on firm performance, using Danish longitudinal matched employer–employee data merged with unique cross-sectional representative firm survey data on work environment conditions. We estimate standard production functions, augmented with workplace environment indicators, addressing both time-invariant and time-varying potentially relevant unobservables in the production process. We find positive and large productivity effects of improved physical dimensions of the health and safety environment, specifically, “internal climate” and “monotonous repetitive work”.

  • 7.
    Böhlmark, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Grönqvist, Erik
    Vlachos, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN), Sweden.
    The Headmaster Ritual: The Importance of Management for School Outcomes2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 118, no 4, p. 912-940Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We estimate the impact of individual principals on school outcomes by using panel data that allow us to track principals over time. We find that individual principals have a substantive impact on school policies, working conditions, and student outcomes. In particular, students who attend a school that has a one standard deviation better principal improve their achievement by between 0.05 and 0.1 standard deviations. Despite rich background information on principals, it is difficult to characterize successful management, suggesting that innate skills are central. We find that the scope for discretion is larger among voucher schools and in areas with school competition.

  • 8.
    Calmfors, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Larsson Seim, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Pattern bargaining and wage leadership in a small open economy2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 115, no 1, p. 109-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pattern bargaining with the tradables (manufacturing) sector as the wage leader is common in Europe. We question the conventional wisdom that such bargaining produces wage restraint. In our model, all forms of pattern bargaining give the same outcomes as uncoordinated bargaining under inflation targeting. Under a monetary union, wage leadership for the non-tradables sector is conducive to wage restraint, whereas wage leadership for the tradables sector is not. Comparison thinking might lead the follower to set the same wage as the leader. Such equilibria can arise when the leader sector is the smaller sector, and these can promote high employment.

  • 9.
    Celikaksoy, Aycan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nielsen, H. S.
    Smith, N.
    The Effect of Marriage on Education of Immigrants: Evidence from a Policy Reform Restricting Marriage Migration2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 111, no 3, p. 457-486Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10. Dahlberg, Matz
    et al.
    Edmark, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Berg, Heléne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Revisiting the Relationship between Ethnic Diversity and Preferences for Redistribution: Reply2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 119, no 2, p. 288-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we respond to the comments raised by Nekby and Pettersson-Lidbom on our paper Dahlberg et al. (2012, Journal of Political Economy 120, 41-76). We argue that our estimates are internally valid, but we acknowledge that the external validity could have been discussed more thoroughly.

  • 11. Ferguson, Shon
    et al.
    Forslid, Rikard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Sizing Up the Impact of Embassies on Exports2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 121, no 1, p. 278-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to test for the effects of trade promotion via the foreign service. The theory of trade with heterogeneous firms predicts that unilateral trade promotion allows medium-sized firms to export. We investigate the effects of trade promotion using firm-level data and information on the opening and closing of embassies abroad from the very similar neighboring countries Sweden and Norway. We use a difference-in-difference specification where firms from Norway are used as a control group for Swedish firms. Our results show that large firms as well as medium-sized firms respond to the opening of embassies.

  • 12.
    Gerdes, Christer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    The Impact of Immigration on the Size of Government: Empirical Evidence from Danish Municipalities2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 113, no 1, p. 74-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies have reported a negative relationship between ethnic heterogeneity and the size of the public sector. One problem with this literature is that ethnic composition is hardly exogenous, which obstructs attempts to reveal causal mechanisms. This paper explores the impact of changes in ethnic heterogeneity in Danish municipalities from 1995 through 2001, a period marked by an unprecedented influx of refugees. A state-sponsored placement policy restricted their choice of residence and required local governments to accept them as citizens. The analysis of the impact of this influx has not revealed any support for the claim of a decline in public sector size.

  • 13. Häckner, Jonas
    et al.
    Nyberg, Sten
    Rent-Control and Prices of Owner Occupied Housing2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Lindahl, T.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Johannesson, M.
    Bargaining over a Common Resource with Private Information2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 111, no 3, p. 547-565Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15. Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Palme, Mårten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. IZA, Bonn, Germany.
    Persson, Mats
    Sickness Absence and Local Benefit Cultures2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 118, no 1, p. 49-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many countries, sickness absence financed by generous insurance benefits is an important concern in the policy debate. There are strong variations in absence behavior among local geographical areas. Such variations are difficult to explain in terms of observable socioeconomic factors. In this paper, we investigate whether such variations are related to group effects in the form of social interaction among individuals within neighborhoods. Well-known methodological problems arise when trying to answer this question. A special feature of our efforts to deal with these problems is that we adopt several alternative approaches to identify group effects. Our study is based on a rich set of Swedish panel data, and we find indications of group effects in each of our approaches.

  • 16.
    Meriläinen, Jaakko
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Single-Party Rule, Public Spending, and Political Rents: Evidence from Finnish Municipalities2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 121, no 2, p. 736-762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, I investigate the differences in public spending and extraction of political rents between single-party and coalition governments. Common pool theories predict that coalitions tend to spend more and extract more rents than single-party governments. Using data from Finnish municipalities for the years 1997-2012 and a regression discontinuity design approach tailored for proportional elections, I provide causal evidence consistent with the theoretical predictions.

  • 17.
    Nekby, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Pettersson-Lidbom, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Revisiting the Relationship between Ethnic Diversity and Preferences for Redistribution: Comment2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 119, no 2, p. 268-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we revisit the question raised in Dahlberg et al. (2012, Journal of Political Economy 120, 41-76) concerning a causal relationship between ethnic diversity and preferences for redistribution. We find that their results are based on (i) an unreliable and potentially invalid measure of preferences for redistribution, (ii) an endogenously selected sample, and (iii) a mismeasurement of the refugee placement program. Correcting for any of these three problems reveals that there is no evidence of any relationship between ethnic diversity and preferences for redistribution. We also discuss what is currently known about the refugee placement program, and to what extent it can be used for estimating causal effects more generally.

  • 18.
    Pettersson, Jan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Boschini, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Roine, Jesper
    Resource Curse or not: A Question of Appropriability2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 109, no 3, p. 593-617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whether natural resources are good or bad for a country's development are shown to depend on the interaction between institutional setting and, crucially, the types of resources possessed by the country. Some natural resources are, for economical and technical reasons, more likely to cause problems such as rent-seeking and conflicts than others. This potential problem can, however, be countered by good institutional quality. In contrast to the traditional resource curse hypothesis, we show the impact of natural resources on economic growth to be non-monotonic in institutional quality, and increasingly so for certain types of resources. In particular, countries rich in minerals are cursed only if they have low-quality institutions, while the curse is reversed if institutions are sufficiently good. Furthermore, if countries are rich in diamonds and precious metals, these effects—both positive and negative—are larger.

  • 19.
    Pettersson-Lidbom, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Thoursie, Peter Skogman
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Temporary Disability Insurance and Labor Supply: Evidence from a Natural Experiment*2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 115, no 2, p. 485-507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most developed countries have compulsory insurance programs for temporary disability, that is, cash benefits for non-work-related sickness. Despite the economic significance of these programs, little is known about their effects on work absenteeism or labor supply. We exploit a policy reform that consisted of the abolishment of a waiting day together with an increase of cash benefits for short sick leaves. We find that the total number of days of sickness absence was reduced by the reform, which is likely due to the fact that the abolishment of the waiting period made it less costly for workers to be absent for short periods.

  • 20.
    Priks, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Do Surveillance Cameras Affect Unruly Behavior? A Close Look at Grandstands2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 116, no 4, p. 1160-1179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do surveillance cameras affect unruly spectator behavior? I examine this question using a natural experiment from the Swedish soccer league. Stadiums in Sweden introduced surveillance cameras at different points in time during the years 2000 and 2001. I exploit the exogenous variation that occurred because of differences across stadiums in the processing time taken to obtain permits for cameras as well as delays in the supply of equipment. Conditioning on stadium fixed effects, unruly behavior was found to be approximately 65 percent lower in stadiums with cameras compared to stadiums without cameras. The identification strategy provides a unique possibility to address problems regarding endogeneity, simultaneous policy interventions, and displacement effects.

  • 21.
    Säve-Söderbergh, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Self-Directed Pensions: Gender, Risk and Portfolio Choices2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 114, no 3, p. 705-728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, I investigate gender differences in financial risk-taking from a new perspective, and I show that gender plays a different role across the risk distribution. To evaluate risk-taking, I exploit portfolio choices following a reform that entitles almost the entire Swedish workforce to choose a risk profile for a part of their public-pension contributions. The novel finding is that portfolio risk does not differ much between the men and women who choose less risky portfolios, while the men who choose risky portfolios take on significantly more risk than do the women who choose risky portfolios. The findings are robust to investors choosing the default alternative, chasing past returns, rebalancing, and different measures of risk-taking.

1 - 21 of 21
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