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  • 1.
    Besley, Timothy
    et al.
    London School of Economics.
    Persson, Torsten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Sturm, Daniel M.
    London School of Economics.
    Political Competition, Policy and Growth: Theory and Evidence from the US2010In: The Review of Economic Studies, ISSN 0034-6527, E-ISSN 1467-937X, Vol. 77, no 4, p. 1329-1352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper develops a simple model to analyse how a lack of political competition may lead to policies that hinder economic growth. We test the predictions of the model on panel data for the US states. In these data, we find robust evidence that lack of political competition in a state is associated with anti-growth policies: higher taxes, lower capital spending, and a reduced likelihood of using right-to-work laws. We also document a strong link between low political competition and low income growth.

  • 2.
    Burchardi, Konrad B.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies. Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development (BREAD), UK; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR), UK.
    Chaney, Thomas
    Hassan, Tarek A.
    Migrants, Ancestors, and Foreign Investments2019In: The Review of Economic Studies, ISSN 0034-6527, E-ISSN 1467-937X, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 1448-1486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use 130 years of data on historical migrations to the U.S. to show a causal effect of the ancestry composition of U.S. counties on foreign direct investment (FDI) sent and received by local firms. To isolate the causal effect of ancestry on FDI, we build a simple reduced-form model of migrations: Migrations from a foreign country to a U.S. county at a given time depend on (1) a push factor, causing emigration from that foreign country to the entire U.S., and (2) a pull factor, causing immigration from all origins into that U.S. county. The interaction between time-series variation in origin-specific push factors and destination-specific pull factors generates quasi-random variation in the allocation of migrants across U.S. counties. We find that doubling the number of residents with ancestry from a given foreign country relative to the mean increases the probability that at least one local firm engages in FDI with that country by 4 percentage points. We present evidence that this effect is primarily driven by a reduction in information frictions, and not by better contract enforcement, taste similarities, or a convergence in factor endowments.

  • 3.
    Krusell, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Mukoyama, Toshihiko
    Dep. of Economics, University of Virginia.
    Sahin, Aysegül
    Purdue University, Krannert School of Management.
    Labor-Market Matching with Precautionary Savings and Aggregate Fluctuations2010In: The Review of Economic Studies, ISSN 0034-6527, E-ISSN 1467-937X, Vol. 77, no 4, p. 1477-1507Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Moen, Espen R.
    et al.
    Rosén, Åsa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Incentives in Competitive Search Equilibrium2011In: The Review of Economic Studies, ISSN 0034-6527, E-ISSN 1467-937X, Vol. 78, no 2, p. 733-761Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a labour market model with job search frictions where workers have private information on match quality and effort. Firms use wage contracts to motivate workers. In addition, wages are also used to attract employees. We define and characterize competitive search equilibrium in this context, and show that it satisfies a simple modified Hosios rule. We also analyse the interplay between macroeconomic variables and optimal wage contracts. Finally, we show that private information may increase the responsiveness of the unemployment rate to changes in the aggregate productivity level and, in particular, to changes in the information structure.

  • 5.
    Zenou, Yves
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Calvó-Armengol, Antoni
    Patacchini, Eleonora
    Peer Effects and Social Networks in Education2009In: The Review of Economic Studies, ISSN 0034-6527, E-ISSN 1467-937X, Vol. 76, no 4, p. 1175-1204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We develop a model that shows that, at the Nash equilibrium, the outcome of each individual embedded in a network is proportional to his/her Katz-Bonacich centrality measure. This measure takes into account both direct and indirect friends of each individual, but puts less weight to his/her distant friends. We then bring the model to the data using a very detailed dataset of adolescent friendship networks. We show that, after controlling for observable individual characteristics and unobservable network specific factors, a standard deviation increase in the Katz-Bonacich centrality increases the pupil school performance by more than 7% of one standard deviation.

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