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  • 1.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Boréus, Kristina
    Neergaard, Anders
    Yazdanpanah, Soheyla
    Speaking up, leaving or keeping silent: racialized employees in the Swedish elderly care sector2017In: Work, Employment and Society, ISSN 0950-0170, E-ISSN 1469-8722, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 954-971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When encountering problems and dissatisfaction in the workplace, employees may choose between three strategies: voice; exit; or silence. Using survey data and interview material from a study of employees in an elderly care organization in Sweden, this article investigates the workers' perceptions of the eligibility and prospects of these strategies and which individual characteristics and situational factors might affect them. The focus is on racialized workers (operationalized through their region of birth) who, according to earlier studies, are less likely than other employees to choose voice behaviour. Contrary to some earlier studies, the results here attribute such a propensity to the importance of power differences across racial hierarchies' rather than to differences in cultural values. Individuals in this (racialized) category have a lower occupational status, earn less and experience less favourable relationships with their managers.

  • 2.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Research in International Migration and Ethnic Relations (CEIFO). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Research in International Migration and Ethnic Relations (CEIFO).
    Neergaard, Anders
    REMESO Linköpings universitet.
     Social capital and wage disadvantages among immigrant workers2010In: Work, Employment and Society, ISSN 0950-0170, E-ISSN 1469-8722, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 761-779Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the characteristics that affect access to social capital for employees in a single industrial firm in Sweden, and the impact of their social capital on their monthly salaries. The results demonstrate that being a member of a stigmatised immigrant group is associated with a substantial social capital deficit. This deficit arises because immigrant workers are embedded in social networks that constrain their ability to acquire valuable social resources or are excluded from social networks with valuable resources. Another finding is that the average salary earned by members of stigmatised immigrant groups is lower than that earned by native-born workers. The observed wage gap cannot be explained by ‘human capital’ variables. However, when social capital variables were taken into account, wage gaps noticeably shrank, which indicates that part of the wage disadvantage experienced by immigrants is likely to represent the impact of unequal access to social capital.

  • 3.
    Boye, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Care More, Earn Less? The Association between Taking Paid Leave to Care for Sick Children and Wages among Swedish Parents2019In: Work, Employment and Society, ISSN 0950-0170, E-ISSN 1469-8722, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 983-1001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wages are related to parenthood and to child-related absences from work. The link between leave to care for sick children (CSC) and wages is understudied, however. CSC may negatively influence human capital and work capacity, and send the employer signals about work commitment. The short spells of CSC make this form of leave particularly suitable for testing the signalling theory. This study analysed data from Swedish population registers and showed that CSC use was associated with lower wages, particularly among men, up to 13 years after the birth of the first child. The association was strongest at high wage levels. Self-selection of parents with certain unmeasured characteristics into (high) CSC use was one, but not the only, explanation. The results support the idea that child-related time off negatively influences wages through a signalling effect. In addition, human capital or work capacity may suffer with frequent CSC use.

  • 4.
    Boye, Katarina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Grönlund, Anne
    Workplace Skill Investments - An Early Career Glass Ceiling? Job Complexity and Wages Among Young Professionals in Sweden2018In: Work, Employment and Society, ISSN 0950-0170, E-ISSN 1469-8722, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 368-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite higher educational investments, women fall behind men on most indicators of labour market success. This study investigates whether workplace skill investments set men and women off on different tracks in which the human capital acquired through higher education is either devalued or further developed. A survey sample of Swedish men and women who recently graduated from five educational programmes, leading to occupations with different gender composition, is analysed (N approximate to 2300). Results show that, a few years after graduation, men are more likely than women to acquire complex jobs and that this difference contributes to early career gender gaps in wages and employee bargaining power. The findings do not support the notion that child-related work interruptions provide a main mechanism for sorting women into less complex jobs.

  • 5.
    Evertsson, Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Grunow, Daniela
    Aisenbrey, Silke
    Work interruptions and young women's career prospects in Germany, Sweden and the US2016In: Work, Employment and Society, ISSN 0950-0170, E-ISSN 1469-8722, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 291-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article assesses the impact of discontinuous work histories on young women's occupational mobility in Germany, Sweden and the US. Women with continuous work histories are compared with those with gaps due to family leave, unemployment, or other reasons. The German Life History Study, the Swedish Level of Living Survey and the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth are used to estimate Cox regression models of the transition rate to downward or upward occupational mobility. The results indicate that US women face increased downward mobility with increasing duration of both family leave and unemployment. German women with unemployment experience are also more likely to encounter downward mobility, but no such relationship is found for family leave. In Sweden, family leave experience reduces the chances of upward mobility. Results question the human capital approach, according to which skills should deteriorate at the same rate independent of the reason for the leave.

  • 6.
    Hagqvist, Emma
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Vinberg, Stig
    Tritter, Jonathan Q.
    Wall, Erika
    Landstad, Bodil J.
    The Same, Only Different: Doing Management in the Intersection between Work and Private Life for Men and Women in Small-scale Enterprises2019In: Work, Employment and Society, ISSN 0950-0170, E-ISSN 1469-8722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to elucidate how male and female managers of small-scale enterprises in Norway and Sweden relate to and experience the intersection between work and private life. A qualitative content analysis was adopted to explore interviews with 18 managers. The analysis resulted in three primary categories: conflict as a part of the deal, using management to construct balance, and management identity contributing to enrichment. A key theme that emerged was doing management. Both men and women reproduced masculine values in describing their management identities and in explaining how they enacted management. This clear identification was used to legitimate conflict, construct balance and explain the interaction between work and private life as enriching. How the managers enacted gender emerged primarily in how they related to family responsibilities and their feelings of guilt in relation to home and children.

  • 7.
    Holmqvist, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Medicalization of unemployment: individualizing social issues as personal problems in the Swedish welfare state2009In: Work, Employment and Society, ISSN 0950-0170, E-ISSN 1469-8722, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 405-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports qualitative data on how the Swedish Public Employment Service classifies unemployed individuals as 'occupationally disabled' in order to transfer them to various labour market programmes. The article draws on a framework of medicalization, arguing that the individualization of the social issue of unemployment into a personal trouble of disability is a neglected yet important phenomenon that has interesting implications for theory and policy. By classifying some people as disabled in order to explain their unemployment, medicalization can be seen as an important yet so far neglected mechanism in understanding how this individualizing enterprise comes about. It is concluded that by medicalizing unemployment, the target for society's intervention to fight the spectre of unemployment is primarily individuals' personal troubles rather than any social issues.

  • 8. Lambert, Paul S.
    et al.
    Bihagen, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Using occupation-based social classifications2014In: Work, Employment and Society, ISSN 0950-0170, E-ISSN 1469-8722, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 481-494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Occupation-based social classifications are important social indicators, but are easily misunderstood. Using survey data from the UK and Sweden, we summarize the empirical relations between a number of alternative occupation-based social classifications. Results indicate similarity between most measures, though there are often quite considerable differences in the properties of related classifications according to the level of detail at which they have been operationalized (such as the number of categories). While these findings may seem unsurprising, they are in conflict with canonical theoretical interpretations attributed to occupation-based measures, where the level of detail is often overlooked, whereas the concepts associated with different measures are emphasized.

  • 9.
    Longarela, Iñaki R.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School. UiT – The Arctic University of Norway, Norway.
    Explaining vertical gender segregation: a research agenda2017In: Work, Employment and Society, ISSN 0950-0170, E-ISSN 1469-8722, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 861-871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research agenda outlines possible routes to pursue an explanation of vertical gender segregation. The analysis emphasizes the expanding opportunities brought about by a combination of Big Data and public policies, like gender quotas, and uncovers important challenges for which possible solutions are offered. Experimental work is likely to remain very useful in the pursuit of answers to this asymmetric gender presence.

  • 10.
    Magnusson, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    The gender wage gap in highly prestigious occupations: a case study of Swedish medical doctors2016In: Work, Employment and Society, ISSN 0950-0170, E-ISSN 1469-8722, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 40-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The gender wage gap within a highly prestigious occupation, the medical profession, is investigated both longitudinally and cross-sectionally using Swedish administrative data. This is done by investigating: to what extent the gender wage gap among physicians varies between fields of medicine (within-occupation segregation) and across family status; whether there is an association between parenthood and wages among physicians and, if so, whether there is a gender difference in this association; and changes in the gender wage gap among physicians over time. The results indicate a large overall gender wage difference for medical doctors. Even when gender differences in specialization are taken into account, men have higher wages than women do. For both men and women physicians, there is a positive association between parenthood and wages. The longitudinal analyses show that the gender wage gap among physicians was greater in 2007 than in 1975.

  • 11.
    Meagher, Gabrielle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Macquarie University, Australia.
    Szebehely, Marta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Mears, Jane
    How institutions matter for job characteristics, quality and experiences: A comparison of home care work for older people in Australia and Sweden2016In: Work, Employment and Society, ISSN 0950-0170, E-ISSN 1469-8722, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 731-749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article seeks to understand a puzzling finding: that workers in publicly-funded home care for older people in Australia, compared to those in Sweden, feel that they are better able to meet their clients’ needs, that their workplaces are less pressed, and that their work is less burdensome and more compatible with their family and social commitments. This finding seems to challenge expectations fostered by comparative sociological research that job quality and care services are inferior in Australia compared to Sweden. Informed by comparative institutionalist theory and care research, the structures and dynamics of the care systems in the two countries are analyzed, along with findings from the NORDCARE survey of home care workers conducted in Sweden in 2005 (n=166) and Australia in 2010 (n=318). Differences in the work and working conditions in the two countries are explained by the dynamic interaction of national institutional and highly gendered sector-level effects.

1 - 11 of 11
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