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  • 1. Ericsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Stasinski, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Stenström, Emma
    Body, mind, and soul principles for designing management education: an ethnography from the future2022In: Culture and Organization, ISSN 1475-9551, E-ISSN 1477-2760, Vol. 28, no 3-4, p. 313-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we advance the conversation about management education by outlining a future scenario of management teaching in which art is employed as a method, learning goal, and methodology. The scenario is informed by our personal experiences of teaching management and art expressed in terms of three design principles for management education: the principles of body, mind, and soul; and it is presented as an ethnography from the future. This future is envisioned to be characterized by four assumptions: that students are co-creators of knowledge; that the role of teachers is to facilitate the students' learning processes; that Artificial Intelligence is an integral part of learning processes; and that the primary learning objective for the students is to develop their relations to the world and contribute with feasible future solutions to wicked problems and global challenges.

  • 2.
    Grafström, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Jonsson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Lund University, Sweden.
    Professional blinders? The novel as an eye-opener in organizational analysis2019In: Culture and Organization, ISSN 1475-9551, E-ISSN 1477-2760, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 146-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholarly textbooks often follow a logic where suitable empirical cases are selected to illustrate the theoretical and analytical points that we as scholars want to make. But what would happen if we would do the opposite: build a textbook on a novel written by a novelist for such purpose and let the theories explain the actions and emotions of fictional characters? In this article, we share and reflect upon our experiences of co-authoring a textbook in organization theory together with a professional novelist. We argue that the novel can function as an eye-opener in organizational analysis, forcing us to look beyond more static and rationalistic perspectives on organizations as well as the stereotypes of such. We build and relate our experiences to the growing literature about using fiction in scholarly work and discuss the potential of such genre-bending work when we bring in flesh and blood into the analyses.

  • 3.
    Holmgren Caicedo, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Accounting.
    Defying interpretation: Dwelling on and delving into metonymy2014In: Culture and Organization, ISSN 1475-9551, E-ISSN 1477-2760, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 232-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To defy interpretation, delay sense making and accommodate a process view, I propose metonymy as an alternative/complement to metaphor in organization studies. By way of three examples I attempt to show how the unpacking of metonymies, i.e. metonymic reading, can delay metaphorical interpretation to allow for the inclusion of alternative views of concrete experience. Thus, although metonymy ultimately yields to metaphor, it seems worthwhile to dwell on and delve into. 

  • 4.
    Holmgren Caicedo, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    The story of us: on the nexus between metaphor and story in writing scientific articles2011In: Culture and Organization, ISSN 1475-9551, E-ISSN 1477-2760, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 403-416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inquiring along the lines of reflexivity into the style of scientific articles as portrayed in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA), an attempt is made to bring forth the nexus between metaphor and plot in the story of academic writing. The contention is that the APA manual expounds a protoplot (B. Czarniawska. 1999. Writing management - organization theory as a literary genre. Oxford: Oxford University Press) in and through its description/prescription of the form of the scientific article that is held together by a metaphor, the incessant strife for progress, that binds together the elements of the story (plot) of writing scientific articles. Writing is then the creation of organization in an always already organized manner so that we can know a scientific article as a scientific article and ensure ever-forward motion in and through its end.

  • 5.
    Maravelias, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Faster, harder, longer, stronger – management at the threshold between work and private life: The case of work place health promotion2018In: Culture and Organization, ISSN 1475-9551, E-ISSN 1477-2760, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 331-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies Work Place Health Promotion at two international corporations as an example of an unobtrusive control that targets employees’ lifestyles. It uses Michel Foucault's concepts of neoliberal governmentality and post-disciplinary control to show how Work Place Health Promotion breaks with the disciplinary logic of control most commonly associated with studies of unobtrusive controls in organizations. While discipline is centripetal, correcting employees’ misconduct so that they freely keep within prescribed norms, Work Place Health Promotion is centrifugal, targeting employees’ lifestyles and promoting those existing faculties and inclinations that may increase their activity, performance and their health. It hereby emerges as less restrictive than organizational discipline, but also as more discriminating. For not only does it subject employees’ lifestyles to an economic logic of investment and disinvestment, it also contributes to an exclusion of employees that fail in this regard in the name of their lack of health.

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  • 6.
    Schriber, Svante
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    King, David R.
    Bauer, Florian
    Deadly sins and corporate acquisitions2021In: Culture and Organization, ISSN 1475-9551, E-ISSN 1477-2760, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although having grown significantly to constitute a strong influence in several fields of business research, research on corporate acquisitions still needs fresh voices. Research on acquisitions is dominated by functionalist studies searching for ways to improve financial outcomes. In contrast, this paper draws on a narrative approach to provide a new perspective to corporate acquisitions. We focus on decision-makers and how a metaphor that highlights human foibles connected to sins can offer a new understanding of corporate acquisitions. Engaging with acquisition literature and underpinning our argument with examples from well-known acquisitions, provides a new way of understanding commonly identified but socially unaccepted outcomes from acquisitions generally described as unintended and unwanted.

  • 7.
    Schwartz, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    The animal welfare battle: the production of affected ignorance in the Swedish meat industry debate2020In: Culture and Organization, ISSN 1475-9551, E-ISSN 1477-2760, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 75-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish animal welfare debate has for years focused on the meat industry, which sees animals not as sentient creatures but as production factors and commodities to be economically exploited. Although animal rights organizations have tried to change the meat industry and consumer behaviour, meat consumption is increasing. This could be explained as ‘affected ignorance’ generated by what one already knows but does not want to hear about. This paper discusses how various actors, such as meat industry companies, food retailers, and social movement organizations, frame animal welfare in the media debate with the use of discourses, which are important for producing or discouraging affected ignorance. The paper examines a discursive battle in which actors draw on various discourses over time but also hijack opponents’ discourses. This use of discourses seems to blur the debate and confuse people and they will continue to eat meat from factory-farmed animals.

  • 8.
    Thanem, Torkild
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    The body without organs: Nonorganizational desire in organizational life2004In: Culture and Organization, ISSN 1475-9551, E-ISSN 1477-2760, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 203-217Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Thanem, Torkild
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    ‘There’s no limit to how much you can consume’: the New Public Health and the struggle to manage healthy bodies2009In: Culture and Organization, ISSN 1475-9551, E-ISSN 1477-2760, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 59-74Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Wettermark, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    'You're the one that I want': differentiating between beneficiaries in voluntary organizations2023In: Culture and Organization, ISSN 1475-9551, E-ISSN 1477-2760, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 197-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines differentiations between beneficiaries in voluntary organizations. Drawing on the writings of Ahmed and Bauman, the paper suggests that beneficiaries are socially constructed through efforts to assist them and according to complex and varied criteria that combine immediate ‘re-cognition’ of otherhood with attention to the ‘achievements’ of beneficiaries, i.e. how well beneficiaries narrate and perform their assimilability. Taking the case of language cafés as an example, the study suggests that differentiations between beneficiaries emerge not only according to essentialist criteria, but also according to how convincingly beneficiaries express optimism about the future, intention to contribute to local community, and willingness to shed their past, and how respectful of boundaries they appear in the eyes of selves. Relational, narrative, and ideological dimensions then complement essentialist criteria to influence if/how others are included, implying that identities of both selves and others need to be seen as relational and context dependent.

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