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  • 1. Friedman, Jonathan
    Rhinoceros 21999Ingår i: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 40, nr 5, s. 679-694Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 2.
    Ghirlanda, Stefano
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    Acerbi, Alberto
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    Enquist, Magnus
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning. Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Nakamaru, Mayuko
    Department of Value and Decision Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology.
    The Sometimes Evitable Route to Conservatism and Persuasiveness: A Reply to Xue and Costopoulos2010Ingår i: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 51, nr 2, s. 271-272Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 3.
    Ghirlanda, Stefano
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    Magnus, Enquist
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning. Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Nakamaru, Mayuko
    Department of Systems Engineering, Shizuoka University.
    Cultural Evolution Develops Its Own Rules: The Rise of Conservatism and Persuasion2006Ingår i: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 47, nr 6, s. 1027-1034Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 4.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Socialantropologiska institutionen.
    Writing Futures An Anthropologist's View of Global Scenarios2015Ingår i: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 56, nr 6, s. 797-818Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Toward the end of the twentieth century, the Cold War ended, and globalization became a key word in public discourse. In the new situation people could ask, with relief or anxiety, what might happen next. So a small but lively intellectual industry rose to the challenge, creating scenarios for a born-again world. As the world turned, there would be more of them. With 9/11 there was another wave of global commentary. There were hot wars in Central Asia and the Middle East, and then, with economic upheavals spreading rather unevenly over the world, there were shifts in the global centers of gravity. This again generated more scenarios for the world. Often, the future visions could be encapsulated in striking catchphrases: the end of history, the clash of civilizations, jihad versus McWorld, soft power, and others. The Eric Wolf Lecture of 2014 scrutinizes world scenarios as a genre of creative writing but also considers their role as a set of representations of the world that are now circulated, received, and debated in a worldwide web of social relationships. As a contemporary sociocultural phenomenon, the scenarios come out of a zone of knowledge production where academia, media, and politics meet. The authors are global public intellectuals. While anthropology has contributed little to them directly, these writings deserve attention for the way they offer the Big Picture of the world and, at times, for their use of cultural understandings.

  • 5.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Socialantropologiska institutionen.
    Comment on article1998Ingår i: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, ISSN 0011-3204, Vol. 39, nr 2Artikel, recension (Refereegranskat)
  • 6.
    Körling, Gabriella
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Socialantropologiska institutionen.
    Comments on Ruben Andersson "Here Be Dragons: Mapping an Ethnography of Global Danger"2016Ingår i: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 57, nr 6, s. 2s. 723-724Artikel, recension (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 7.
    Lansing, John Stephen
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Murray, P. Cox
    The Domain of the Replicators: cultural Evolution and the Neutral Theory2011Ingår i: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 52, nr 1, s. 105-125Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Do cultural phenomena undergo evolutionary change, in a Darwinian sense? If so, is evolutionary game theory (EGT) the best way to study them? Opinion on these questions is sharply divided. Proponents of EGT argue that it offers a unified theoretical framework for the social sciences, while critics even deny that Darwinian models are appropriately applied to culture. To evaluate these claims, we examine three facets of cultural evolution: (i) cultural traits that evolve by Darwinian selection, (ii) cultural traits that affect biological fitness, and (iii) coevolution of culture and biology, where selection in one affects evolutionary outcomes in the other. For each of these cases, the relevance of EGT depends on whether its assumptions are met. Those assumptions are quite restrictive: selection is constant, time horizons are deep, the external environment is not part of the game, and neutral processes such as drift are irrelevant. If these conditions are not met, other evolutionary models such as neutrality, coalescence theory, or niche construction may prove more appropriate. We conclude that Darwinian processes can occur in all three types of cultural or biological change. However, exclusive reliance on EGT can obscure the respective roles of selective and neutral processes.

  • 8.
    McElreath, Richard
    et al.
    University of California, Department of Anthropology.
    Strimling, Pontus
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för evolutionär kulturforskning.
    When natural selection favors imitation of parents2008Ingår i: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 49, nr 3, s. 307-316Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    It is commonly assumed that parents are important sources of socially learned behavior and beliefs. However, the empirical evidence that parents are cultural models is ambiguous, and debates continue over their importance. A formal theory that examines the evolution of psychological tendencies to imitate parents (vertical transmission) and to imitate nonparent adults (oblique transmission) in stochastic fluctuating environments points to forces that sometimes make vertical transmission adaptive, but oblique transmission recovers more quickly from rapid environmental change. These results suggest that neither mode of transmission should be expected to dominate the other across all domains. Vertical transmission may be preferred when (1) learned behavior affects fertility rather than survival to adulthood, (2) the relevant environmentis stable, or (3) selection is strong. For thoseinterested in the evolution of social learning in diverse taxa, these models provide predictions for use in comparative studies.

  • 9.
    Shore, Cris
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholms centrum för forskning om offentlig sektor (SCORE). University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    How Corrupt Are Universities? Audit Culture, Fraud Prevention, and the Big Four Accountancy Firms2018Ingår i: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 59, s. s92-S104Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Corruption narratives, like witchcraft accusations, offer a lens for analyzing social relations, economic interests, and hidden structures of power. Developing this theme, I examine discourses of corruption in the context of growing concerns about fraud prevention and anti-corruption in universities. Moving beyond critiques of university administrations as bureaucratic, self-serving entities whose interests are increasingly antithetical to the academic mission of the university, I ask, What is corruption in academia and how does this assumed problem relate to academic capitalism and the rise of audit culture? The empirical context for my study is the extraordinary increase in institutionalized fraud prevention programs, particularly those offered by the Big Four accountancy firms. Taking as my case study the introduction of a whistle-blower hotline at one Australasian university, I examine the politics and interests behind such schemes. The increasing involvement of accountancy firms in nonauditing work, including anti-corruption services, illustrates how corruption narratives operate as market-making strategies. I examine how commercialization, risk management, and auditing proliferate anti-corruption initiatives and how audit firms collude in the risk and corruption that they claim to ameliorate. I conclude by assessing the implications for the anthropology of corruption of the growing penetration of universities by an increasingly commercially focused tax industry that, some argue, cannot even be trusted to regulate itself.

  • 10.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för tvåspråkighetsforskning.
    Response to Blommaert: Language, asylum and the national order2009Ingår i: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 50, nr 4, s. 434-435Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
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