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  • 1.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    Södertörns högskola.
    Transparency and legibility in international institutions: the UN Global Compact and post-political global ethics2011In: Social Anthropology, ISSN 0964-0282, E-ISSN 1469-8676, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 378-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article examines the organisational production and distribution of normatively charged ideas for governing transnational business. Based on the United Nations Global Compact Initiative, it is argued that the UN version of ‘corporate social responsibility’ (CSR) builds on a metanarrative of rationality, involving ideals of transparency and legibility combined with an emphasis on consensus and harmony. The strong accent on partnership, agreement and dialogue leaves little space for the involved parties to articulate and defend diverging interests. By transforming what are basically political conflicts of interest into win–win terms, CSR standards and the technologies of transparency, legibility, and accountability foreclose conflictual space, and emerge as an instance of ‘post-political global ethics’.

  • 2. Hagberg, Sten
    et al.
    Körling, Gabriella
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Urban land contestations and political mobilisation: (re)sources of authority and protest in West African municipalities2016In: Social Anthropology, ISSN 0964-0282, E-ISSN 1469-8676, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 294-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper is based on anthropological research on socio-political opposition in West African municipalities. We analyse how land schemes for urban development are at the centre of social contest and political mobilisation in municipalities, by developing examples from peri-urban areas of Bamako, Mali and Niamey, Niger. We point to several contradictions that lie at the heart of zoning, one of the most dominant forms of urban land management and urban development in many cities in West Africa. They concern, first, who actually benefits from zoning projects and the promises of development and modernisation; second, the dual role of zoning projects as sources of both public resources and private enrichment; third, the gradual replacement of village populations and the rekindling of a politics of belonging; and, finally, the emergence of new political moralities in the face of corruption and mismanagement. We conclude that urban land contests are simultaneously sources and resources of authority and protest. While the skilful and creative combination of these sources and resources is an asset in municipal politics, political mobilisation is also fuelled by protest movements of those marginalised in urban land management schemes, carving out new spaces for socio-political opposition in West African municipalities.

  • 3.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    What do we see if we look at the border from the other side?2019In: Social Anthropology, ISSN 0964-0282, E-ISSN 1469-8676, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 409-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We live in a time of wall fetishism. Never have human beings been so obsessed with building walls as they are today. Walls are, however, age-old. Empires built walls. And if we look closer, we can see that there are still traces of the old imperial visions in the modern borders and border walls. In this essay I will look at the connections of wars and walls, walls and empires. Through a radical historicisation I will argue that there is a link between the installation of border walls (here) and the unsettling of communities (there). The current border regime is part of a larger and older project of colonial accumulation by dispossession and expulsion; stealing wealth, labour force and time. I will also argue that border crossing discloses the cracks in the dominant narration of borders and that travellers without papers denaturalise what are otherwise naturalised borders, and politicise what are otherwise depoliticised borders. I will illustrate this argument by following travellers without papers along the railways in the Balkans; tracing Afghan deportees in Kabul; and following the social life of the materialities used in the oil sites in Iran and in the wall between Mexico and the USA.

  • 4.
    Pan, Darcy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Student Visas, Undocumented Labor, and the Boundaries of Legality: Chinese migration and English as a foreign language education in the Republic of Ireland2011In: Social Anthropology, ISSN 0964-0282, E-ISSN 1469-8676, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 268-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article studies Chinese student migrants who are at risk of becoming undocumented through their engagement with the labour market in the Republic of Ireland. The migrants I am concerned with are not elite dual-passport holders, but rather individuals who strategically participate in transnational migration as part of an emerging Chinese middle class. By closely examining the interrelation between the educational sector and migration industry through the everyday lives of Chinese student migrants, I argue that criteria set up by states are often translated into bureaucratic categories which can be manufactured and commercially supplied in the process of migration.

  • 5.
    Rabo, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Muslim women in Scandinavia2009In: Social Anthropology, ISSN 0964-0282, E-ISSN 1469-8676, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 480-483Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Rabo, Annika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Research in International Migration and Ethnic Relations (CEIFO).
    Wright, Susan
    Danish School of education, University of Aarhus.
    Introduction: Anthropologies of university reform2010In: Social Anthropology, ISSN 0964-0282, E-ISSN 1469-8676, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Thedvall, Renita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Managing preschool the Lean way: Evaluating work processes by numbers and colours2015In: Social Anthropology, ISSN 0964-0282, E-ISSN 1469-8676, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 42-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The management model Lean, originating from the car industry, has in recent years spread like wildfire in the public sector. One important component in the model is to set targets that are measurable to show results, visualising how taxpayers' money is used. The article examines how Swedish public-sector preschool staff handle evaluative techniques in the form of numbers and colours within the Lean model. The article shows their eagerness to comply with the ethics of evaluation, while at the same time resisting what they understand as hard-core statistics by, for example, introducing monitoring that includes feelings and experiences.

  • 8.
    Uimonen, Paula
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Coming of Age in Second Life. An Anthropologist Explores the Virtually Human: Boellstorff, Tom. 2008.2009In: Social Anthropology, ISSN 0964-0282, E-ISSN 1469-8676, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 486-488Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Uimonen, Paula
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Internet, arts and translocality in Tanzania2009In: Social Anthropology, ISSN 0964-0282, E-ISSN 1469-8676, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 276-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores Internet development and use at an Arts College in Tanzania in relation to translocal and transnational linkages. Chuo Cha Sanaa Bagamoyo, or Bagamoyo College of Arts, is the only institute for training of arts professionals in East Africa. The College has a high status on the national art scene and is well known throughout the region and internationally. In this article, the introduction and subsequent use of the Internet is analysed in relation to the social composition and cultural positioning of Chuo Cha Sanaa Bagamoyo. I will argue that the social embeddedness of the Internet represents an intensification of translocal and transnational relations and imageries, while underscoring a sense of locality and national identity.

  • 10.
    Ullberg, Susann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Modern Crises and Traditional Strategies. Local Ecological Knowledge in Island Southeast Asia: Review of Ellen, Roy (Ed.). 2007.2009In: Social Anthropology, ISSN 0964-0282, E-ISSN 1469-8676, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 123-124Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Ullberg, Susann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Weathering the world: recovery in the wake of the tsunami in a Tamil fishing village, by Hastrup, Frida2012In: Social Anthropology, ISSN 0964-0282, E-ISSN 1469-8676, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 344-345Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Wulff, helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Imagining landscapes: past, present and future, edited by Janowski, Monica and Tim Ingold2013In: Social Anthropology, ISSN 0964-0282, E-ISSN 1469-8676, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 585-586Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    In Favour of Flexible Forms: Multi-Sited Fieldwork2015In: Social Anthropology, ISSN 0964-0282, E-ISSN 1469-8676, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 355-357Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 13 of 13
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