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  • 1.
    Alm, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Isolating the effect of eviction on criminal convictions: Results from a Swedish study2018In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 263-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On an individual level, criminal offending is linked to resource deficiencies. Since evictions tend to affect society’s weakest groups, we would expect evicted individuals to be convicted of crime to a higher degree than others even before eviction. But is there also a direct effect of eviction on criminal convictions? The aim of this study was to isolate the effect of eviction on criminal convictions. Propensity score matching was used and the analyses included all individuals evicted in Sweden from 2009 to 2010 (n = 5050), and a 10% sample of the adult population (n = 770,000). After matching based on relevant background factors, the analyses showed a significant increase in criminal convictions from the year of eviction until the end of the period studied, two to three years later. The pattern was similar for men and women. Future research should investigate eviction in relation to different types of crime.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Gender, family life course and attitudes towards divorce in Sweden2016In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 51-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates the impact of union formation, parenthood and union dissolution on Swedes’ attitudes toward divorce. The results, based on fixed-effects models of longitudinal data from the Young Adult Panel Study (YAPS), suggest a prevalent, albeit small, influence of family life-course events on attitudes toward divorce in Sweden. Attitudes toward divorce are studied using two survey statements: ‘It is too easy to get divorced in today’s Sweden’ (item A) and ‘Parents should stay together for the sake of their children’ (item B). For both items, union dissolution from parental relationships is associated with a decrease in intolerance toward divorce, but only for women. For men, but not for women, parental union formation increases intolerance toward divorce as measured by item B. The results are discussed in relation to the literature on gendered family life-course experiences.

  • 3.
    Aspers, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Order in Garment Markets2008In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, no 3, p. 187-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this theoretical article is to analyse the social construction of order in two connected markets in the production flow of the global garment industry. The consumer market is identified as a status market, while the production market is defined as a `standard' market. In a `status' market, order is maintained because the identities of actors on both sides of the market are ranked according to status, which is a more entrenched social construction than the commodity traded in the market. In a market characterized by `standard', the situation is the reverse: the commodity is a more entrenched social construction than the identity rankings of actors in the market. The study ties together consumption and production of garments through several markets.

  • 4. Autto, Janne Mikael
    et al.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Justifications of citizens' subject positions in public debates on welfare2017In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 61-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Foucault's work has inspired studies examining how subject positions are constructed for citizens of the welfare state that encourage them to adopt the subject position of active and responsible people or consumers. Yet these studies are often criticised for analysing these subject positions as coherent constructions without considering how their construction varies from one situation to another. This paper develops the concept of subject position in relation to the theory of justification and the concept of modality in order to achieve a more sensitive and nuanced analysis of the politics of welfare in public debates. The theory of justification places greater weight on actors' competence in social situations. It helps to reveal how justifications and critiques of welfare policies are based on the skilful contextual combination of diverse normative bases. The concept of modality, in turn, makes it possible to elaborate how subject positions in justifications and critiques of welfare policies become associated with specific kinds of values. We demonstrate the approach by using public debates on children's day care in Finland. The analysis illustrates how subject positions are justified in relation to different kinds of worlds and made persuasive by connecting them to commonly desirable rights, responsibilities, competences or abilities.

  • 5.
    Azarian, Reza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Social Ties Elements of a Substantive Conceptualization2010In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 323-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Paradoxically, the contemporary network approach has so far declined to produce a theoretically elaborate account of social relationships - the very core entities that underpin both its ontological outlook and methodological stance. This article addresses certain substantive aspects of social connectivity that are either theoretically underdeveloped or largely neglected in this approach. These include: (1) the essential and defining properties of relationships; (2) their inherent dynamics; (3) the impact of larger socio-cultural contexts in which specific ties and networks emerge; and, finally, (4) various grounds of connectivity and general types of social ties. The article concludes with a discussion of how the prevailing formalistic conception of social tie poses an obstacle to the materialization of the great potentials of the network approach and how a substantive re-conceptualization of its bedrock entity may open up the possibility of turning this mode of inquiry into a truly relational approach.

  • 6.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Goldscheider, Frances
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Attitudes to the gender division of labor and the transition to fatherhood: Are egalitarian men in Sweden more likely to remain childless?2016In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 269-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most European countries, including Sweden, have witnessed considerable postponement of first births over the past several decades, and societal gender equality has been mentioned among the central reasons for the delay in childbearing. Continued postponement of parenthood over the life course can result in final childlessness, i.e. the individual will reach the end of his/her reproductive period without having become a parent. As levels of final childlessness have been increasing in most European countries, studies of childlessness have become more common. However, most of these studies deal exclusively with women, and the theorizing regarding what leads to final childlessness, particularly among men, is clearly underdeveloped. In this paper we will contribute to this research area by investigating the long-term relationships between attitudes toward domestic gender equality and men's transition to parenthood in Sweden. Our dependent variable is a close approximation of final childlessness. We use Swedish panel survey data on attitudes to the gender division of labor among still childless young adults aged 22-30 in 1999, combined with register data on births in the period 1999-2012. The article shows that the initial delay in becoming fathers evidenced by more egalitarian men is not made up in the long term.

  • 7.
    Bihagen, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rosemary Crompton: Class and Stratification2009In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 176-191Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Bihagen, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nermo, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Stern, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    The gender gap in the business elite: stability and change in characteristics of Swedish top wage earners in large private companies, 1993-20072014In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 119-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using unique Swedish register data on all employees in large private companies, we study trends in the gender composition of top wage employees from 1993 to 2007. The analyses reveal that the likelihood of women holding top wage positions has more than doubled since the early 1990s, but men are still markedly over-represented in this group of employees. We focus on educational choices, considering level and field of study as well as university attended. One important conclusion is that, although education is important in reaching a top wage position, field of education and university attended only marginally explain the gender  gap. However, relative to other women, having a career signalling degree (i.e. economics, law or engineering) from a more prestigious university helps women. Dividing the sample into different cohorts indicates that the gender gap is partly a cohort effect, i.e. it is smaller among those born in the 1960s compared to cohorts born in the 1940s and 1950s. It should be noted that there is still a gender gap among employees born in the 1960s and that the gap widens after age 30. Future studies should focus more deeply on this family-related ‘period of divergence’.

  • 9.
    Bihagen, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nermo, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Stern, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Åberg, Yvonne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Elite mobility among college graduated men in Sweden: Skills, personality and family ties2017In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 60, no 4, p. 291-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using Swedish registry data, we study the chances of mobility into the Swedish labour market elite for men who graduated in the years 1985-2005. The elite is defined as top earners within mid- and large sized firms and within the public sector organisations (henceforth, we use organisation for both firms and public organisations). Using discrete time event history models, we study the incidence of elite entry in terms of external recruitment and internal promotion. The choice of field of study and of college or university are important, as are personality and, to a limited extent, cognitive ability. What is most striking is that having kin in elite positions increases the chance of elite entry in general, and having parents in top positions in the same organisation increases the likelihood of internal promotion. In sum, elite entry among college-educated males is associated with a diversity of factors, suggesting that complex explanations for labour market success should be considered, where skills, personality, and family ties all seem to matter.

  • 10.
    Boye, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Can you stay home today? Parents’ occupations, relative resources and division of care leave for sick children2015In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 357-370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is one of only a few studies on the division of care leave for sick children (temporary parental leave) between parents in Sweden and is the first to examine the importance of differences in parents’ work characteristics. The study uses register data for parents with children born between 1999 and 2002 to analyse two aspects of parents’ employment that may be of importance for the division of care leave: their relative resources, in this case wages, and different occupations. First, the results show that a father’s share of care leave increases as the mother’s relative wage decreases. This suggests that decisions about care leave are influenced by bargaining power gained through differences in resources. Second, the resources of couples where both partners work in the same occupation are more equal, and such couples also divide care leave more equally than couples with different occupations. However, the fact that same-occupation couples tend to share care leave more equally does not seem to be explained by similarities in the partners’ work characteristics, and may instead be due to unmeasured, stable characteristics. Greater income and career possibilities for the women are proposed as a possible explanation of the division of care leave for same-occupation couples.

  • 11. Bukodi, Erzsebet
    et al.
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Goldthorpe, John H.
    The effects of social origins and cognitive ability on educational attainment: Evidence from Britain and Sweden2014In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 57, no 4, p. 293-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In previous work we have shown that in Britain and Sweden alike parental class, parental status and parental education have independent effects on individuals’ educational attainment. In this paper we extend our analyses, first by also including measures of individuals’ early-life cognitive ability, and second by bringing our results for Britain and Sweden into direct comparative form. On the basis of extensive birth-cohort data for both countries, we find that when cognitive ability is introduced into our analyses, parental class, status and education continue to have significant, and in fact only moderately reduced and largely persisting, effects on the educational attainment of members of successive cohorts. There is some limited evidence for Britain, but not for Sweden, that cognitive ability has a declining effect on educational attainment, and a further cross-national difference is that in Britain, but not in Sweden, some positive interaction effects occur between advantaged social origins and high cognitive ability in relation to educational success. Overall, though, cross-national similarities are most apparent, and especially in the extent to which parental class, status and education, when taken together, create wide disparities in the eventual educational attainment of individuals who in early life were placed at similar levels of cognitive ability. Some wider implications of these findings are considered.

  • 12.
    Bunar, Nihad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    The Geographies of Education and Relationships in a Multicultural City Enrolling in High-Poverty, Low-Performing Urban Schools and Choosing to Stay There2010In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 141-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given the institutional and financial opportunity to choose any school public or private/independent - in the city, how are we to understand students choosing to stay in their low-performing, high-poverty schools with bad reputations? Drawing on interviews with 53 students from two urban schools in Stockholm and Malmo, as well as on the secondary literature and theoretical perspectives on community discourse and the freedom of choice policy, I argue that we will never understand why students choose to stay if we consider only the values of the pedagogical commodities exchanged in the educational quasi-market. The analytical gaze ought to embrace sociological perspectives on the local community and schools, including individual strategies in relation to school choice and the power of relations, categorization and stigmatization. Thus, I conclude that neither deficiency in information, transportation costs and time nor some murky cultural-religious incentives are behind the decision to stay. The major incentive can be found in the ongoing negotiations between different aspects of community and school discourse that young people develop, whereby, among other things, the prospect of losing a network and the feeling of safety and becoming an outsider in exchange for gaining access to a 'Swedish' middle-class school is, for the time being, not deemed a fair deal.

  • 13.
    Bygren, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Unpacking the causes of segregation across workplaces2013In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 3-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The way employee flows generate ethnic and gender segregation across workplaces is investigated using a population sample of 80,139 workplaces with 977,978 employees in the Stockholm area. Comparisons of actual stocks and flows of employees across workplaces to counterfactual simulations of these reveal that segregation clearly has a random component to it: Even with random allocation of employees to workplaces, segregation would still be substantial. Systematic (non-random) segregation appears to be upheld primarily because employees recruited to workplaces are similar to those already employed there, not because underrepresented groups within workplaces are systematically screened out. This tendency appears to be less connected to between-group differences in education, occupation or industry, but instead largely sustained by the tendency of employers to select new employees from a pool of workplaces where their employees have been employed previously. Network recruiting might generate this pattern, but unobserved individual and workplace factors cannot be ruled out as potential confounders. The results speak to theories of homosociality applied to segregation processes: If homosocial biases affect segregation, they apparently do so mostly in the recruitment process to workplaces, but less so through processes of exclusion of minorities from workplaces.

  • 14.
    Edling, Christofer
    et al.
    Department of Sociology, Lund University.
    Farkas, Gergei
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Rydgren, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Women in power: Sex differences in Swedish local elite networks2013In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 21-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women occupy a small minority of elite positions in contemporary society. In addition, the minority of women who gain access to influential elite positions are often assumed to have their actual influence circumscribed by mechanisms of marginalization. However, systematic evidence to support the latter view is relatively scarce. We apply social network analysis to study sex differences in local elite networks in Sweden, and show empirically that, despite the fact that women are the minority group across all elite dimensions, female elites uphold the same 'structural status' as male elites.

  • 15.
    Erikson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Goldthorpe, John H.
    Hällsten, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    No way back up from ratcheting down? A critique of the 'microclass' approach to the analysis of social mobility2012In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 211-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    'Microclasses', detailed occupational groups, have recently been suggested as being the basis of research in social stratification; occupations represent 'real' social groups in contrast to the purely 'nominal' categories of either 'big class' schemata or socio-economic status scales. The microclass approach in social mobility research has been applied in a recent paper, the authors claiming to show that a strong propensity exists for intergenerational occupational inheritance, and that such inheritance is the dominant factor in social reproduction and limits equality of opportunity. We model a larger version of the same Swedish dataset as used by these authors. We show: (i) that while with many occupational groups a marked degree of intergenerational inheritance occurs among men, such inheritance is far less apparent among women, and, for both men and women, accounts for less than half of the total association in the occupational mobility table; (ii) that the microclass approach does not deal in a theoretically consistent way with the remaining associational underlying patterns of occupational mobility, since appeal is made to the theoretically alien idea of 'socio-economic closeness'; and (iii) that a standard class approach, modified to account for occupational inheritance, can provide a more integrated understanding of patterns of immobility and mobility alike. We also give reasons for doubting whether it will prove possible to establish a theoretically consistent microclass approach to explaining intergenerational mobility propensities. Finally, on the basis of our empirical results and of the relevant philosophical literature, we argue that the microclass approach is unlikely to be helpful in addressing normative questions of equality of opportunity.

  • 16.
    Evertsson, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The importance of work: Changing work commitment following the transition to motherhood2013In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 139-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use the longitudinal Young Adult Panel Study to examine changes in subjective work commitment among new mothers in Sweden. With a sample of childless women in 1999, we study changes in work commitment occurring between 1999 and 2003, comparing those who had a child during this period with those who did not. In the 1999 sample, there is no difference between the two groups in terms of work commitment. However, in 2003, women who gave birth during this period are less work committed than other women. Although the changes in women's work commitment on average are small, our findings indicate that the transition to motherhood - with all of the changes it brings - may lead to a redistribution of priorities and slightly lower work commitment among new mothers compared with non-mothers. Additional analyses indicate that the negative relationship between becoming a mother and work commitment is restricted to the first few years of a child's life. When women have children older than four years of age, they are not less work committed than non-mothers. We interpret this lower work commitment as a way of temporarily adjusting to the difficulties of combining work and family during the early pre-school years.

  • 17.
    Forsberg, Lucas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Managing Time and Childcare in Dual-Earner Families Unforeseen Consequences of Household Strategies2009In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 162-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article documents how dual-earner families employ different household strategies when managing time and childcare in everyday life. In particular, the focus is the unforeseen consequences of household strategies, that is, novel emerging problems, cultural ideals and subjectivities. In this ethnographic study of eight middle-class couples in Sweden, I analyse three household strategies: delegating, alternating and multitasking. While parents apparently use these strategies to juggle the multiple demands of everyday life in a time-efficient way, they also comply with a norm of involved parenthood. Thus, when employing household strategies, the parents balance between enacting themselves as involved parents and running the risk of being understood as uninvolved.

  • 18. Grönlund, Anne
    et al.
    Halldén, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Magnusson, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    A Scandinavian success story? Women’s labour market outcomes in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden2017In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 97-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In current research, the extensive family policies of the Scandinavian countries have been problematized and described as hampering women's careers. However, mechanisms have been little investigated and the Scandinavian countries are often regarded as a single policy model. Based on an account of institutional variety we study gender gaps in hourly wages and access to authority positions in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden and explore the importance of segregation, skills and work interruptions. The analysis uses pooled cross-sectional data from the European Social Survey (ESS) for 2004 and 2010. The results show that gender gaps vary both in size and regarding the mechanisms producing them. In particular, we find that gender segregation has a radically different impact in the four countries. The analysis suggests that the mechanisms linking family policies to labour market outcomes are more complex than envisaged in the current debate and point to the importance of comparing seemingly similar countries.

  • 19.
    Hällsten, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Edling, Christofer
    Rydgren, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The acculturation in Sweden of adolescents of Iranian and Yugoslavian origin2018In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 163-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethnic acculturation in a sample of 19-year-old individuals of Yugoslavian and Iranian origin in contemporary Sweden was studied, with a focus on how acculturation is contingent on social structure and social context. Acculturation was measured as orientation to the majority and the parental culture of origin. The results suggest, first, that the two dimensions are weakly but positively correlated, meaning that acculturation identity does not involve any trade-offs, as new strands of oppositional culture theory suggest. Second, it was found that ethnic closure in friendship networks is positively associated with orientations to parents' culture and negatively with orientations to Swedish culture. Individuals with a rich occupational social contact network tended to be orientated towards both the majority and the parental culture. There was a marked social difference between the most disadvantaged social class and all other classes, with the former being less oriented to both cultures compared to more advantaged classes.

  • 20.
    Magnusson, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    More Women, Lower Pay? Occupational sex composition, wages and wage growth2013In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 227-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research consistently shows that the share of females in an occupation is negatively associated with wages, and this has frequently been interpreted as an expression of devaluation of women’s work. However, few studies have described the detailed shape of     the relationship between wages and occupational sex composition. Using Swedish register data from 2001 and 2003, I advance our understanding of the devaluation process by studying the functional form more closely in both the cross-section and panel.                     The analyses reveal a non-linear relationship between sex composition and wages, where the highest wages for both men and women are earned in sex-integrated occupations. Second, studying the wage payoffs of people moving across occupations with varying sex compositions shows that both sexes gain by moving to relatively sex-integrated occupations (about 25 to 54% female).

  • 21.
    Magnusson, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Why is there a Gender Wage Gap According to Occupational Prestige?: An Analysis of the Gender Wage Gap by Occupational Prestige and Family Obligations in Sweden2010In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 99-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies have shown that women receive lower wage returns to attained occupational prestige than do men. In this article I examine whether the gender difference in wage return for attained occupational prestige can be explained by men’s and women’s different family obligations, and whether gender differences in work characteristics, which are difficult to combine with family duties, account for some of the gender wage gap in returns for attained occupational prestige. If women’s family obligations were a major cause of women’s disadvantage, the negative interaction between women and occupational prestige with regard to wages would be larger for mothers and married/cohabiting women than for single women without children. Results show a gender wage gap between married/cohabiting men and women with children that grow with occupational prestige. However, the interaction between gender and prestige is insignificant among single women and men and among married/cohabiting respondents without children. Furthermore, when controlling for time-consuming work, the gender wage gap for married/cohabiting respondents with children according to occupational prestige narrows, especially in occupations with high prestige.

  • 22.
    Moors, Guy
    et al.
    Tilburg University, Holland.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Splitting up or getting married?: Competing Risk Analysis of Transitions Among Cohabiting Couples in Sweden2009In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 227-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we investigate which ideational variables influence the propensity of cohabiting couples to transform their union into marriage, separation or continued cohabitation. The question is particularly relevant in the Swedish context of considerable social acceptance of unmarried cohabitation even among parents. A two-wave panel study including 705 never-married respondents cohabiting at the time of the first survey shows that ideational factors influence subsequent behaviour, even when different sets of control variables are included in the model. Familistic attitudes, work-related values and reflections about the quality of the relationship prove to be predictors of the transition to either marriage or separation, even when intentions are taken into account.

  • 23.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Need, A
    Van der Kolk, H
    Family policy as an institutional context of economic inequalityIn: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    van der Kolk, Henk
    Need, Ariana
    Women's earnings and household inequality in OECD countries, 1973-20132017In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 3-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article shows that women's rising earnings contributed to reducing inequality in household earnings, with respect to couples. We use data from the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS) on 1,148,762 coupled households, covering 18 OECD countries and the period from 1973 to 2013. In this period, women's share of household earnings grew, spouses' earnings became more strongly and positively correlated in various countries, and inequality in women's earnings was reduced. Inequality in household earnings increased due to the rising correlation between spouses' earnings, but was reduced more by the decline of inequality in women's earnings. Had women's earnings remained unchanged since the 1970s and 1980s, inequality in household earnings would have been higher around 2010 in all observed OECD countries. Household inequality was reduced least by trends in women's earnings in countries with a long history of high female labor-force participation, such as Finland (3% reduction) and Sweden (5%), and most in countries that observed a stronger increase in female labor-force participation in recent decades such as Spain (31%) and the Netherlands (41%). As more countries are reaching a plateau in the growth of women's employment and earnings, the potential for further stimulating women's employment and earnings to counter both women's and household inequality seems to be increasingly limited.

  • 25.
    Obucina, Ognjen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Paths into and out of poverty among immigrants in Sweden2014In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 5-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I analyse longitudinal patterns of relative poverty among the foreign-born in Sweden, with data drawn from the register-based LINDA dataset. The descriptive statistics suggest that immigrants stay in poverty longer than poor natives do, just as they more often fall back into poverty. Poverty transitions are more frequently associated with employment transition among immigrants than among natives, while other trigger events are more prevalent among natives who experience poverty transition. Conditional transition rates of all the events associated with poverty exits and entries are more favourable for natives. The multivariate analysis shows that poverty is stickier among immigrants even after controlling for the observable characteristics, but the degree of disadvantage relative to natives varies greatly by immigrant group. Longer duration of stay and living with a Swedish-born adult are both beneficial in the context of poverty dynamics.

  • 26.
    Olsson, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    The Role of  Relations: Do Disadvantaged Adolescents Benefit More from High-Quality Social Relations?2009In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 263-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article interrogates whether the social background of adolescents affects (1) the quality of their relations with parents and teachers, and (2) the potentially beneficial effects of these relations on school-related and psychological outcomes. Previous studies suggest that social background does affect the quality of social relations, although weakly, and that these in turn affect various outcomes. However, the results are inconclusive as to whether the quality of social relations of different importance for adolescents from different social backgrounds, and such an interaction effect could be predicted from different perspectives. The data are based on a nationally representative sample of Swedish adolescents between 10 and 18 years of age (n = 2,645) and include several aspects of social background, social relations and outcomes. The data are ideally suited to this question, in that information about social relations and outcomes is child-reported, while information on social background is parent-reported and based on register data. The results confirm that social relations are conducive to various outcomes, and show that disadvantaged adolescents have weaker relations with parents and teachers. Furthermore, they imply that relations with teachers are of particular importance for disadvantaged adolescents’ school and psychological outcomes, while parental relations are equally important for both advantaged and disadvantaged adolescents.

  • 27. Sirnio, Outi
    et al.
    Kauppinen, Timo M.
    Martikainen, Pekka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). University of Helsink, Finland; Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Germany.
    Cohort differences in intergenerational income transmission in Finland2017In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 21-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major social changes such as occupational restructuring, educational expansion and increasing income inequality are likely to significantly influence the intergenerational transmission of income. The aim in this article is to investigate this question in an analysis of the transmission of low and high income in Finland in five birth cohorts born between 1956 and 1978. The focus is on the contribution of parental social class and personal educational level to this association. The analyses are based on a longitudinal register-based data set that is a representative 11-per-cent sample of the Finnish population. The level of intergenerational income transmission among those with a low- and a high-income parental background is stable among men, and is increasing slightly among women. Simultaneously, the role of achieved education as a mechanism strengthens slightly upon entry to the lowest income level, and declines upon entry to the highest level. These results indicate that despite the increasing income inequality, intergenerational transmission remains rather stable, but the mediating role of educational qualifications may have changed. Occupational restructuring seems to have no clear influence on the process.

  • 28.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Organizing Agendas: Understanding think tanks’ agenda setting as partial organizationIn: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Think tanks offer an organizational innovation that can seamlessly merge research, publicity and advocacy. The pronounced increase in their sheer numbers, coupled with their intensified advocacy and more articulate ideological positions, has contributed to growing academic interest. Conceptualizations, descriptions and categorizations of national and transnational think tanks have been put forth, with good results. Scholar definitions and conceptual understandings of what think tanks do have, however, not been sufficiently developed. In particular, the question of how the ability of think tanks to get others to use their ideas is left un-answered. Employing the concept of ‘partial organizing’ the aim of this paper is to analyse how think tanks work in order to be able to set policy agendas contrary to the interest of other actors. The paper is conceptual in its scope, but it draws on interviews at four think tanks in Washington DC, USA, for explaining and exemplifying the argument. It concludes that think tanks set policy agendas by partially organizing its environment.  

  • 29. Tosi, Marco
    et al.
    Gähler, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nest-leaving, childhood family climate and later parent–child contact in Sweden2016In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 249-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we ask whether the time spent in the parental home promotes the frequency of contacts between generations, and whether violating social norms regarding the socially accepted time for leaving home is related to less frequent interactions with parents in later life. We also devote particular attention to union dissolution and family conflict during childhood and adolescence as possible mechanisms behind this relationship. Employing multilevel linear probability models, data from two waves of the Swedish Level of Living Survey (2000 and 2010) are used to analyze earlier family history and face-to-face contacts between parents and their adult children. The findings reveal that the duration of co-residence is likely to foster family interactions in later life, and this positive relationship is only marginally explained by childhood family experiences. However, late home leavers tend to maintain frequent contacts with parents in part owing to having moved shorter geographical distances, and this is more evident for adult daughters than for sons. In addition, adult daughters who stay at home for longer have more opportunities to form binding relationships with mothers than with fathers.

  • 30. Wiik, Kenneth Aarskaug
    et al.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Noack, Turid
    Love or Money?: Marriage Intentions among Young Cohabitors in Norway and Sweden2010In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 269-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using data from Sweden and Norway on cohabitors aged 25 to 35, we examine the association between socio-economic resources, relationship quality and commitment and cohabitors' marriage intentions. The individualization process, i.e. the arguably growing importance of individual choice, leads us to assume that relationship assessments are more important predictors of marriage intentions than socio-economic variables. Nonetheless, multivariate results show that university education and having a partner whose education is higher than one's own increase the likelihood that cohabitors intend to marry. Likewise, being satisfied with and committed to the union is positively related to having marriage plans. Separate analyses for men and women reveal that whereas commitment is positively related to women's marriage intentions, men's marriage intentions are significantly more influenced by their own education, income, as well as the income of their partners. In this sense, one conclusion to be drawn is that both love and money are associated with cohabitors' intention to marry.

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