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  • 1.
    Alneng, Victor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Book review of:: Finding meaning in pleasure travel by Julia Harrison, 2003.2005In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, Vol. 70, no 2, p. 273-274Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Gavanas, Anna
    Uppsala University.
    Grasping Communitas2008In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 127-133Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The article reviews the book "Rave Culture and Religion," edited by Graham Saint John.

  • 3.
    Gemzöe, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies.
    Review of Jan Brögger”Nazaré. Women and Men in a Pre-Bureaucratic Portuguese Fishing Village”.1994In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, no 1-2Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Gemzöe, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies.
    Review of W. Arens  ”The Original Sin: Incest and Its Meaning”.1988In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, no 1-2Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Graham, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Anthropologists Are Talking about Queer Anthropology2016In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, Vol. 81, no 2, p. 364-377Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Helmfrid, Sigrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Review of: Saul, M. and P. Royer (2002) "West African Challenge to Empire. Culture and History in the Volta-Bani anticolonial War"2003In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 144-145Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Reassembling Indonesian Migration: Biometric Technology and the Licensing of Informal Labour Brokers2018In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, Vol. 83, no 5, p. 832-849Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article takes as its starting point the Indonesian government's attempt to license informal brokers - field agents, or petugas lapangan - who recruit migrant workers that are sent to destinations across Asia and the Middle East. The licensing programme utilises biometric fingerprint technology in order to reinforce the boundaries of the Indonesian migration assemblage through the rearticulation of the category of the broker. The article argues that this programme and the attempt to license informal brokers through technology should be conceptualised not strictly in relation to the securitisation of migration, nor as a response to fragmentation in the wake of neoliberalisation, but more broadly in relation to concerns with regulating brokers that lead back to the Dutch colonial era.

  • 8.
    Machado-Borges, Thaïs
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies, Institute of Latin American Studies.
    Review of Laura Spielvogel’s Working Out in Japan. Shaping the Female Body in Tokyo Fitness Clubs (2003). Durham and London: Duke University Press.2005In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, Vol. 70, no 2, p. 276-77Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Norman, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Controlling a Future by Admiring a Past: An Ecomuseum in Sweden1993In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, Vol. 58, no 1-2, p. 37-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article considers some aspects of an historical open-air museum, an 'eco-museum', in a region called the Bergslag in mid-Sweden, an area renowned for its age-old iron -ore mining and iron foundries and its modern steel industry. It is now an area in economic decline with a relatively high unemployment rate—proclaimed by the state some years ago as a 'crisis area' in need of 'economic and cultural support and development'. The argument of the article is that concern with controlling the future is a central motivation for the ecomuseum to turn to the past, since history is interpreted as a rational continuity and the roots of local identity, essential ingredients in the making of a good future. This lends the concentration on varying techniques of iron production and work some of its cultural meaning. This concentration is a projection of present values and interests on to the past—from which people in turn seek knowledge as if it were something natural of the past while in fact the cultural identity and a sense of uniqueness are inherent in the events of their ongoing lives, tied to places and networks of social relations.

  • 10.
    Norman, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Equality and Exclusion: Racism in a Swedish Town2004In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 204-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on racism is prolific but ethnographic studies of what could be termed racism in everyday local social life are much less common. The article examines local Swedish classifications of difference and belonging in relation to meanings of racism and considers how ideologies of equality relate to forms of exclusion and racist expressions. The aim is to discuss the articulation of distinctions of exclusion and inclusion in everyday contexts through the presence of the refugee Other. The material is based on fieldwork conducted during the first half of the 1990s in a small town in central Sweden.

  • 11.
    Norman, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Ironic Body: Obscene Joking Among Swedish Working-Class Women1994In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, Vol. 59, no 3-4, p. 187-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes the usage of every day forms of obscene joking among primarily working-class women in a small town in Sweden. The author considers obscenity as symbolically related to the sometimes painful, sometimes absurd experiences of sexuality and bodily functions, andas an expression for and a means of coping with the incongruities of social life. Through the form of humor, obscenity becomes a subtle and complex means of cultural and social critique. This also creates a sense of community among the women who engage in the obscene joking.

  • 12.
    Rabo, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Belonging in an Adopted World. Race, Idenity, and Transnational Adoption2012In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 272-273Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Uimonen, Paula
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    #MeToo in Sweden: Museum Collections, Digital Archiving and Hashtag Visuality2019In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In October 2017, the Nordic Museum in Stockholm launched its #metoo collection. The aim was to capture the viral #MeToo campaign that in Sweden has been likened to a (feminist) revolution. Based on archival research, interviews and media analysis, this article explores public submissions to the #metoo collection and analyses the museum's rationale for collecting what is considered to be difficult cultural heritage. Noting the absence of images in the collection, the article argues that the iconic hashtag #MeToo constitutes an alternative form of digital visuality, here termed hashtag visuality. Hashtag visuality, the article suggests, is an emerging form of visual representation that captures the multimodal logic of social media, blurring distinctions between texts and images. In Sweden, #MeToo hashtag visuality reveals the contradictory prevalence of structural sexism and sexual violence in a country with a national self-image of gender equality and a self-proclaimed feminist government, while affirming feminist agency.

  • 14.
    Vonderau, Asta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Scaling the Cloud: Making State and Infrastructure in Sweden2019In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, Vol. 84, no 4, p. 698-718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Popular representations imagine the internet as being immaterial and fluid; hidden from the public eye are the industry and complex infrastructure securing the functionality of the World Wide Web, as well as this industry's social and environmental effects. Focussing on the implementation of a Facebook data centre in the Swedish city of Lulea, this article investigates how the global cloud is localised within a specific historical and social context. It shows how this new industrial development becomes a part of state-making and regional identity-building processes by triggering the re-scaling of territories and shaping new geographies in relation to expanding cloud infrastructures. Tracing those infrastructure-making processes reveals some of the key dynamics between the Swedish state, its regions and the global IT economy.

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