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  • 1.
    Ekström, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Education in Arts and Professions.
    Lindwall, Oskar
    Instruction-in-interaction: The teaching and learning of a manual skillIn: Human Studies, ISSN 0163-8548, E-ISSN 1572-851XArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Karlsson, Gunnar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Sjöberg, Lennart Gustav
    The experience of guilt and shame: A phenomenological-psychological study2009In: Human Studies, ISSN 0163-8548, E-ISSN 1572-851X, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 335-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims at discovering the essential constituents involved in the experiences of guilt and shame. Guilt concerns a subject's action or omission of action and has a clear temporal unfolding entailing a moment in which the subject lives in a care-free way. Afterwards, this moment undergoes a reconstruction, in the moment of guilt, which constitutes the moment of negligence. The reconstruction is a comprehensive transformation of one's attitude with respect to one's ego; one's action; the object of guilt and the temporal-existential experience. The main constituents concerning shame are its anchorage in the situation to which it refers; its public side involving the experience of being perceptually objectified; the exclusion of social community; the bodily experience; the revelation of an undesired self; and the genesis of shame in terms of a history of frozen now-ness. The article ends with a comparison between guilt and shame. Adapted from the source document.

  • 3.
    Leiviskä Deland, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Karlsson, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Fatouros-Bergman, Helena
    A phenomenological analysis of the psychotic experience2011In: Human Studies, ISSN 0163-8548, E-ISSN 1572-851X, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 23-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Six individuals with experience of psychosis were interviewed about their psychotic experiences. The material was analyzed using the empirical phenomenological psychological method. The results consist of a whole meaning structure, a gestalt, entailing the following characteristics: The feeling of estrangement in relationship to the world; the dissolution of time; the loss of intuitive social knowledge; the alienation of oneself, and finally; the loss of intentionality/loss of agency. In brief, the results show that an altered perception of the self and the world was an essential part of the psychotic experience where subjects described themselves as changed; something was sensed as being wrong as psychosis is perceptible but hard to communicate. The normal life-world experience was altered and reality seemed strange. Time perception seemed to be changed as temporality appeared dissolved and the experience of time was focused on the current moment excluding the future. The subjects described loss of intentionality, they were no longer agents in their actions but partly steered by others and they could feel as if their experiences were not theirs. The patients also describe problems regarding their ability to socialize and communicate with others. They seem to lose their intuitive social capacity and were prone to suspiciousness.

  • 4. Lindwall, Oskar
    et al.
    Ekström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Education in Arts and Professions.
    Instruction-in-Interaction: The Teaching and Learning of a Manual Skill2012In: Human Studies, ISSN 0163-8548, E-ISSN 1572-851X, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 27-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study takes an interest in instructions and instructed actions in the context of manual skills. The analysis focuses on a video recorded episode where a teacher demonstrates how to crochet chain stitches, requests a group of students to reproduce her actions, and then repeatedly corrects the attempts of one of the students. The initial request, and the students' responses to it, could be seen as preliminary to the series of corrective sequences that come next: the request and the following attempts make it possible for the teacher to launch instructional sequences specifically designed and addressed to the students who need further guidance. In the interaction between the teacher and the novice student, the reasoned character of the instructed actions is not explained so much as installed and tuned. The materiality of the project makes it possible for the two parties to methodically and meticulously adjust their actions in accordance with each other, and towards the gradual realization of the aimed-for results. In connection to this, a number of issues pertaining to the reproducibility and recognizability of manual skills are raised: how instructions-in-interaction orient towards the progression of the skill rather than the interaction itself; how attempts by and mistakes of the instructed party provide grounds for further instruction; and, consequently, how instructions in the form of corrections build on the instructor's continuous assessments of the instructed actions.

  • 5.
    Lymer, Gustav
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Blomberg, Olle
    Experimental Philosophy, Ethnomethodology, and Intentional Action: A Textual Analysis of the Knobe Effect2019In: Human Studies, ISSN 0163-8548, E-ISSN 1572-851X, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 673-694Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In “Intentional action and side-effects in ordinary language” (2003), Joshua Knobe reported an asymmetry in test subjects’ responses to a question about intentionality: subjects are more likely to judge that a side effect of an agent’s intended action is intentional if they think the side effect is morally bad than if they think it is morally good. This result has been taken to suggest that the concept of intentionality is an inherently moral concept. In this paper, we draw attention to the fact that Knobe’s original interpretation of the results is based on an abstract rendering of the central scenario (the Chairman scenario) that is significantly different from the vignettes presented to the survey participants. In particular, the experimental vignettes involve temporal and social dimensions; they portray sequences of social actions involving an agent and an interlocutor, rather than a lone agent making a momentary decision in light of certain attitudes. Through textual analyses of a set of vignettes used to study the Knobe effect, drawing on ethnomethodology, conversation analysis, and discursive psychology, we show that there are many differences between the experimental conditions besides the moral valence of the side effect. In light of our textual analyses, we discuss vignette methodology in experimental philosophy and suggest an alternative interpretation of Knobe’s original experimental results. We also argue that experimental philosophy could benefit from considering research on naturally occurring social interaction as an alternative source of empirical findings for discussions of folk-psychological concepts.

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