Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Abiala, Kristina
    et al.
    Hernwall, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tweens negotiating identity online – Swedish girls' and boys' reflections on online experiences2013In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 951-969Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do Swedish tweens (10–14 years old) understand and experience the writing of their online identities? How are such intertwined identity markers as gender and age expressed and negotiated? To find some answers to these questions, participants in this study were asked to write a story about the use of online web communities on pre-prepared paper roundels with buzzwords in the margins to inspire them. Content analysis of these texts using the constant comparative method showed that the main factors determining how online communities are understood and used are the cultural age and gender of the user. Both girls and boys chat online, but girls more often create blogs while boys more often play games. Gender was increasingly emphasised with age; but whereas boys aged 14 described themselves as sexually active and even users of pornography, girls of the same age described themselves as shocked and repelled by pornography and fearful of sexual threats. In this investigation an intersectionalist frame of reference is used to elucidate the intertwined power differentials and identity markers of the users' peer group situation.

  • 2.
    Alm, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Dreams meeting reality? A gendered perspective on the relationship between occupational preferences in early adolescence and actual occupation in adulthood2015In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 18, no 8, p. 1077-1095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On the basis of longitudinal data from Sweden (n = 15,211), the article offers a gendered perspective on the relationship between occupational preferences during early adolescence and actual occupations in adulthood. Theoretically the study is based on socialisation theory and devaluation theory. The analyses show that preferences for one's future occupation were stronger among those who came to make gender-typical choices, than among those who chose a gender-atypical occupation. However, a gender difference was also found in that girls who came to choose a male dominated occupation showed a stronger preference for their future occupation in adolescence, than boys who came to choose a female dominated occupation. Results also showed that at a general level, the occupations in adulthood were even more gender segregated than the preferences in adolescence. This was particularly true for girls, who in adolescence expressed a stronger preference to work in a male dominated occupations, than they would later actually do.

  • 3. Alm, Susanne
    et al.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Cause for concern or moral panic? The prospects of the Swedish mods in retrospect2011In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 777-793Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish mods of the 1960s frightened the parental generation like few other youth cultures. Was the concern justified – was the mod culture a hotbed of social maladjustment? Or would the mods come to live conventional lives to the same extent as their peers? We present analyses from a large longitudinal study allowing for a follow-up of individuals identifying with the Swedish mod culture in the late 1960s. Overall, the results point in the least dramatic direction: In mid-life, the vast majority of the former mods lived ordinary lives with work and family. When considering identification with the mod culture only, we do find an over-risk for becoming a social dropout. However, an elaborated analysis identifies the foundations of these problems already in early childhood, i.e. prior to the identification with the mod culture. Social problems in the family may have encouraged these youngsters to turn to a youth culture, but this identification in itself did not contribute to vulnerability. Although the results should be generalised with caution, they could serve as argument against moral panic over teenage identification with youth cultures, and instead shift focus to structures that give some children a disadvantaged start in life.

  • 4.
    Bogren, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The Competent Drinker, the Authentic Person and the Strong Person: Lines of Reasoning in Young People’s Discussions About Alcohol2006In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 515-538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines young people's discussions about alcohol in an Internet chat room. I study how alcohol is meaningful to the young people through specifically focusing their understandings of the concepts control/loss of control, conscientiousness and maturity. I also study what relations of power are constructed among them. The results point to four different lines of reasoning about alcohol: the 'teetotaller argument', the 'age-distinction argument', the 'moderate drinking argument' and the 'getting drunk argument'. From each of these lines of reasoning to the next, there is a shift in the definition of 'the Others'—of those who are said to be immature. In three of the lines of reasoning—the teetotaller argument, the moderate drinking argument and the getting drunk argument—the young people describe the characteristics of what for them appears as an ideal person with ideal views on alcohol consumption and intoxication: the strong person, the competent drinker and the authentic person. In the concluding section of the paper, I discuss and compare these different lines of reasoning with each other and with previous research on young people and drinking.

  • 5.
    Brolin Låftman, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Almquist, Ylva B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Östberg, Viveca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Students' accounts of school-performance stress: a qualitative analysis of a high-achieving setting in Stockholm, Sweden2013In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 932-949Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study is to examine students' experiences of school performance as a stressor. Accounts of school-performance stress at both the individual level and in relation to group mechanisms are studied through qualitative interviews with eighth-grade students in a high-performing school in Stockholm, Sweden (n=49). Using qualitative content analysis, three overarching themes emerged. Students' aspirations include accounts of students whose own high standards are a source of stress, in particular among girls. High performance as a part of their identity is a recurring topic, as well as striving for high marks for the future. External expectations comprise students' views of parents' and teachers' expectations. Generally, students feel that parents are supportive and have reasonable expectations. Students often compare themselves with high-performing siblings, which may be seen as a way of meeting indirect parental expectations. Few students mention teachers' expectations as a source of stress. The high-performing context shows that respondents bear witness to an MVG culture' meaning that many students aim for the highest possible marks. Girls in particular tend to drive up stress levels by talking to each other about pressure at school. Students also compare themselves with each other, which is experienced as competitive and stressful.

  • 6.
    Magnusson, Charlotta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nermo, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    From childhood to young adulthood: the importance of self-esteem during childhood for occupational achievements among young men and women2018In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 21, no 10, p. 1392-1410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the impact of self-esteem during childhood on men’s and women’s occupational prestige in young adulthood. By combining first-hand information from parents in the Swedish Level-of-Living surveys (LNU) 2000 and their children in the Child-LNU in 2000 and the follow-up study in LNU-2010, we are able to assess how self-esteem during adolescence is related to occupational prestige in adulthood. Multivariate analyses were used to determine whether associations between self-esteem (global and domain-specific) in childhood (aged 10–18 years) and occupational prestige in young adulthood (aged 20–28) exist and, if so, what the magnitudes of these associations are for each respective gender.

    For women, there is a positive association between confidence in mathematics and prestige, even when accounting for actual math grades. Global self-esteem is positively related to later occupational prestige as well. For men, self-esteem is unrelated to occupational prestige. Only actual performance in mathematics is important for men’s occupational achievements.

    These results indicate the importance of taking gender differences into account when investigating how self-esteem is related to outcomes in young adulthood. A possible implication is the importance of focusing on the development of self-esteem among children, particularly girls, in school.

  • 7.
    Manhica, Hélio
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Berg, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Almquist, Ylva B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Rostila, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Labour market participation among young refugees in Sweden and the potential of education: a national cohort study2019In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 533-550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This register-based study examined the importance of education on labour market participation among young refugees in Sweden. The study population consisted of unaccompanied (n = 1606) and accompanied refuges (n = 4142), aged 23–26 years in 2006–2010, after 7 years of residence in Sweden. Native Swedish, aged 24 years (n = 347,255) constituted the comparison population, with intercountry adoptees (n = 6689) as an alternative reference group. Gender-stratified multinomial regression models indicated that unaccompanied and accompanied male and female young refugees had higher risks of being in insecure work force and NEET compared to native Swedes with comparable levels of education. However, young refugees and intercountry adoptees with primary education had similar risks of poor labour market outcomes. The educational differences within each group concerning the risk of being in insecure work force were comparable. With the exception of unaccompanied females, secondary education seemed to be less protective against being in NEET among young refugees compared to native Swedes and intercountry adoptees. We conclude that while young refugees face employment disadvantages, education has the potential of mitigating poor labour market outcomes in this group.

  • 8. Pitkänen, Joonas
    et al.
    Remes, Hanna
    Moustgaard, Heta
    Martikainen, Pekka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). University of Helsinki, Finland; Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Germany.
    Parental socioeconomic resources and adverse childhood experiences as predictors of not in education, employment, or training: a Finnish register-based longitudinal study2019In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socioeconomic disadvantage in childhood is common among youth not in education, employment or training (NEETs). However, the evidence on other adverse childhood experiences as determinants of NEET remains scarce. We use Finnish longitudinal register data on a 20% random sample of households with 0-14-year-old children in 2000 to assess the childhood determinants of NEET. For an analytical sample of 99,137 children born 1986-1993, family socioeconomic resources, parental psychiatric disorders and substance abuse, parental death, living in a single-parent household and out-of-home placement under age 13 were used to predict NEET at the age of 18. We show that family socioeconomic disadvantage is strongly associated with NEET (e.g. odds ratio for parental basic education 5.33, 95% confidence interval 4.77, 5.95), whereas associations between adverse childhood experiences and NEET are more moderate (e.g. odds ratio for parent hospitalised for psychiatric disorder 1.86, 95% confidence interval 1.63, 2.12) and largely explained by socioeconomic factors. These associations were mostly similar by gender. The results suggest that parental socioeconomic resources are more important than adverse childhood experiences for the educational and employment transitions of young adults. Thus, supportive social policy for socioeconomically disadvantaged families may smooth these transitions.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf