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  • 1.
    Caretta, Martina Angela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Vacchelli, Elena
    Re-Thinking the Boundaries of the Focus Group: A Reflexive Analysis on the Use and Legitimacy of Group Methodologies in Qualitative Research2015In: Sociological research online, ISSN 1360-7804, E-ISSN 1360-7804, Vol. 20, no 4, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims at problematizing the boundaries of what counts as focus group and in so doing it identifies some continuity between focus group and workshop, especially when it comes to arts informed and activity laden focus groups. The workshop[1] is often marginalized as a legitimate method for qualitative data collection outside PAR (Participatory Action Research)-based methodologies. Using examples from our research projects in East Africa and in London we argue that there are areas of overlap between these two methods, yet we tend to use concepts and definitions associated with focus groups because of the lack of visibility of workshops in qualitative research methods academic literature.

    The article argues that focus groups and workshops present a series of intertwined features resulting in a blending of the two which needs further exploration. In problematizing the boundaries of focus groups and recognizing the increasing usage of art-based and activity-based processes for the production of qualitative data during focus groups, we argue that focus groups and workshop are increasingly converging. We use a specifically feminist epistemology in order to critically unveil the myth around the non-hierarchical nature of consensus and group interaction during focus group discussions and other multi-vocal qualitative methods and contend that more methodological research should be carried out on the workshop as a legitimate qualitative data collection technique situated outside the cycle of action research.

  • 2.
    le Grand, Elias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Linking Moralisation and Class Identity: The Role of Ressentiment and Respectability in the Social Reaction to 'Chavs'2015In: Sociological research online, ISSN 1360-7804, E-ISSN 1360-7804, Vol. 20, no 4, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to link two fields of research which have come to form separate lines of inquiry: the sociology of moralisation and studies on class identity. Expanding on recent papers by Young (2009, 2011) and others, the paper argues that the concepts of ressentiment and respectability can be used to connect moralisation processes and the formation of class identities. This is explored through a case study of the social reaction in Britain to white working-class youths labelled 'chavs'. It is demonstrated that chavs are constructed through moralising discourses and practices, which have some elements of a moral panic. Moreover, moralisation is performative in constructing class identities: chavs have been cast as a 'non-respectable' white working-class 'folk devil' against whom 'respectable' middle-class and working-class people distinguish and identify themselves as morally righteous. Moralising social reactions are here to an important extent triggered by feelings of ressentiment. This is a dialectical process where respectability and ressentiment are tied, not only to the social control of certain non-respectable working-class others, but also to the moral self-governance of the moralisers.

  • 3.
    le Grand, Elias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Youth, Class and Everyday Struggles2020In: Sociological research online, ISSN 1360-7804, E-ISSN 1360-7804Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    University of Twente, The Netherlands.
    Women and Society: The Road to Change2013In: Sociological research online, ISSN 1360-7804, E-ISSN 1360-7804, Vol. 18, no 3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Maunu, Antti
    Friendship and Social Emotions in Young Adult Finns' Drinking diaries2011In: Sociological research online, ISSN 1360-7804, E-ISSN 1360-7804, Vol. 16, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the article we examine the management of social emotions and friendship bonds by analysing the young adults' pub and drinking diaries. We assume that emotions that are embodied in the management of friendship ties can be reduced to the emotions of pride and shame. According to Scheff, as primary social emotions, they are present in all communication and action. They express for the participants of interaction the actual "temperature" of social relations. Pride refers to a strong and safe involvement in interaction, in which individuals feel themselves fine and respectful. In a shameful state, individuals, in turn, experience themselves negatively in the eyes of others, which imply that social bonds are intimidated. The analysis of drinking experiences from the viewpoint of pride and shame brings expressively forth how drinking strengthens or weakens different kinds of social relations and dynamics and how actors try to attach to them or secede from them. In the diary narratives, the pride and shame of drinking is most strongly associated with reinforcement and bonding efforts of ties of friendship that are considered laid-back and like-minded. In relation to them the status, competition, the emphasis of one's self and indulging in love affairs occur in the narratives considerably more seldom, and if they occur, they rather contribute to shameful experiences or remain subordinate to friendship.

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