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  • 1.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Accountability's Effect: Reaction Speed and Legitimacy in Global Governance2016In: Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations, ISSN 1075-2846, E-ISSN 1942-6720, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 575-594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines whether and how accountability in international organizations (IOs) influences their speed of reaction to economic and humanitarian crises. Reaction speed is one among several factors in the capacity of IOs to handle crisis-like problems and, therefore, also a factor in their capacity to create legitimacy for themselves. Original theoretical arguments and statistical survival analyses of the time it takes for IOs to react to crises confirm that accountability in IOs indeed affects reaction speed. However, the effect varies depending on the use of alternative accountability mechanisms. Transparency speeds up reactions while stake-holder participation slows them down. More generally, this article identifies synergies, trade-offs, and nonlinear relationships between reaction speed and different accountability mechanisms that should be reflected in debates on legitimacy in global governance as well as in the institutional design of legitimate IOs.

  • 2. Bexell, Magdalena
    et al.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Uhlin, Anders
    Democracy in Global Governance: The Promises and Pitfalls of Transnational Actors2010In: Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations, ISSN 1075-2846, E-ISSN 1942-6720, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 81-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The participation of transnational actors in global policymaking is increasingly seen as a means to democratize global governance. Drawing on alternative theories of democracy and existing empirical evidence, we assess the promises and pitfalls of this vision. We explore how the structuring and operation of international institutions, public-private partnerships, and transnational actors themselves may facilitate expanded participation and enhanced accountability in global governance. We find considerable support for an optimistic verdict on the democratizing potential of transnational actor involvement, but also identify hurdles in democratic theory and the practice of global governance that motivate a more cautious outlook. In conclusion, we call for research that explores the conditions for democracy in global governance through a combination of normative political theory and positive empirical research.

  • 3.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study, Sweden.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Discretionary Governance: Selection, Secrecy, and Status within the World Economic Forum2021In: Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations, ISSN 1075-2846, E-ISSN 1942-6720, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 540-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Built on the exclusive funding of 1,000 large transnational corporations, the World Economic Forum is a not-for-profit Swiss foundation, aiming to shape the direction of globalization. Its events are characterized by low degrees of formality and transparency. Research on what this organization does is scarce. This article suggests the term discretionary governance to capture the precarious, yet existing, social order that the organization shapes. By discretionary governance, we mean a set of discreet practices based on the organization’s judgement in ways that escape established democratic controls. Drawing on ethnographic data the paper demonstrates how selection, secrecy, and status form key components of this tenuous ordering. Selection processes and secrecy contribute to status elevation of the individuals and organizations chosen to participate. Upon them and the organization itself is bestowed a symbolic capital that is practical and possibly profitable in the world of global governance.

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