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  • 1.
    Agne, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The autonomy of globalizing states: bridging the gap between democratic theory and international political economy2011In: International Political Science Review, ISSN 0192-5121, E-ISSN 1460-373X, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 43-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars of democratic theory and international political economy often disagree over the effects of globalization on state autonomy. Yet, each approach pays minimal attention to the contributions of the other to their common object of study. In an effort to remedy this situation, I identify the premises and procedural habits of each approach which tend to make it appear irrelevant to the other, and then adjust them to remove the appearance of irrelevance without impairing the integrity of each approach. The argument is illustrated by observations from Britain, France and Sweden in recent decades.

  • 2.
    Koliev, Faradj
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Shaming and democracy: Explaining inter-state shaming in international organizations2019In: International Political Science Review, ISSN 0192-5121, E-ISSN 1460-373XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Why do some states name and shame norm-violating states while other states abstain? Inter-state naming and shaming is typically viewed as a political tool to punish adversaries and reward allies. In this study, I propose a regime-type explanation for inter-state shaming in international politics. I pose two interrelated questions. First, are democracies more prone to condemn norm violations than non-democratic countries? Second, are democracies likely to shame each other in cases of norm violations? In search of answers to these questions, I use a unique dataset on inter-state shaming the International Labour Organization (ILO) for the period 1991-2011. In line with my main argument, the results suggest that democracies are more likely than non-democracies to engage in the shaming of norm violators, while providing no evidence for special relations between democracies. In addition, this study unpacks other factors influencing the inter-state shaming. The findings have implications for how we understand state interactions in international politics.

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