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  • 1.
    Bork Petersen, Franziska
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Musicology and Performance Studies.
    Modelling Defiguration2013In: Performance Research, ISSN 1352-8165, E-ISSN 1469-9990, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 157-160Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For the presentation of his autumn/winter 2012 collection in Paris and subsequently in Copenhagen, Danish designer Henrik Vibskov installed a mobile catwalk. The article investigates the choreographic impact of this scenography on those who move through it. Drawing on Dance Studies, the analytical focus centres on how the catwalk scenography evokes a ‘defiguration’ of the walking models and to what effect.

    Vibskov’s mobile catwalk draws attention to the walk, which is a key element of models’ performance but which usually functions in fashion shows merely to present clothes in the most advantageous manner. Stepping on the catwalk’s sloping, moving surfaces decelerates the models’ walk and makes it cautious, hesitant and shaky: suddenly the models lack exactly the affirmative, staccato, striving quality of motion, and the condescending expression that they perform on most contemporary catwalks. Vibskov’s catwalk induces what the dance scholar Gabriele Brandstetter has labelled a ‘defigurative choregoraphy’: a straying from definitions, which exist in ballet as in other movement-based genres, of how a figure should move and appear (1998). The catwalk scenography in this instance determines the models’ walk. Furthermore, letting the models set off sound through triggers with attached sound samples gives them an implied agency. This calls into question the designer’s unrestricted authorship.

  • 2.
    Engdahl, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    The Transtemporality of Online Performance2016In: Performance Research, ISSN 1352-8165, E-ISSN 1469-9990, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 107-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines notions of temporality of online performance as a way to rethink earlier debates about performance ontologies. Today, online, and increasingly mobile, technological activities such as photo and video sharing, instant messaging, blogging and social networking organise around performance practitioners' day-to-day existence. In this networked society, performances are constantly mediated through the prism of myriads of digital platforms. Because performances are enacted within or supported by digitally mediated networks and, this is crucial, they incessantly expand temporally, I will refer to online performance in terms of transtemporality, rather than depend on an ontology of unmediation and presence. I depart from Rebecca Schneider's Performance Remains (2011) where she argues how notions of performance, reiteration and documentation are intertwined and contingent, and from the recent performative answers to the logic of the archive found in Amelia Jones's and Adrian Heathfield's anthology Perform Repeat Record: Live Art in History (2012). I argue, by illustrations of Adam Weinert's performance work (2013-2014) as well as my own (2010-2012), that online performance is never fully present but immanently distended through remediation. Performances participate in inherently ruptured transtemporal networks (tweets, reperformances, blogging, video sharing) through which they are continuously remediated and transformed. I propose that online performance even might suggest that performance continuously escapes a sense of Being. Performance's ontology, or rather its ontogenesis proposed by Heathfield (2012), resides with the elements of transformation inherent in its online remediations.

  • 3.
    Mattsson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Governing by Proximity: On distance and proximity in the criminal trial2017In: Performance Research, ISSN 1352-8165, E-ISSN 1469-9990, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 42-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the inherent tension between techniques of distance and proximity in legal practice. Laying bare the interplay between spatial, social and representational distance and proximity, the article clarifies the politics of the trial and the various kinds of subjectivation that take place in the courtroom. Drawing on the writings of Bourdieu and Foucault, legal practice is seen as making use of a range of power techniques. Law is not only using distancing mechanisms, turning humans into de-personed legal subjects, but it also uses personalizing techniques, investigating both the crime and the criminal and striving for social proximity. In conclusion, the trial comes forth as a ‘therapeutized’ event focused on governing and transforming the subjects, rather than merely judging them. The material consists of observations and experiences made during a field study at the lower level courts of Stockholm, Sweden. In addition, perspectives from anthropological and sociological literature are used to highlight the structural and symbolic dimensions of law.

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