Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Apostolopoulou-Kalkavoura, Varvara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Gordeyeva, Korneliya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Lavoine, Nathalie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Thermal conductivity of hygroscopic foams based on cellulose nanofibrils and a nonionic polyoxamer2018In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 1117-1126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocellulose-based lightweight foams are promising alternatives to fossil-based insulation materials for energy-efficient buildings. The properties of cellulose-based materials are strongly influenced by moisture and there is a need to assess and better understand how the thermal conductivity of nanocellulose-based foams depends on the relative humidity and temperature. Here, we report a customized setup for measuring the thermal conductivity of hydrophilic materials under controlled temperature and relative humidity conditions. The thermal conductivity of isotropic foams based on cellulose nanofibrils and a nonionic polyoxamer, and an expanded polystyrene foam was measured over a wide range of temperatures and relative humidity. We show that a previously developed model is unable to capture the strong relative humidity dependence of the thermal conductivity of the hygroscopic, low-density nanocellulose- and nonionic polyoxamer-based foam. Analysis of the moisture uptake and moisture transport was used to develop an empirical model that takes into consideration the moisture content and the wet density of the investigated foam. The new empirical model could predict the thermal conductivity of a foam with a similar composition but almost 3 times higher density. Accurate measurements of the thermal conductivity at controlled temperature and relative humidity and availability of simple models to better predict the thermal conductivity of hygroscopic, low-density foams are necessary for the development of nanocellulose-based insulation materials.

  • 2. Bergenstråhle-Wohlert, Malin
    et al.
    Angles d'Ortoli, Thibault
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sjöberg, Nils A.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    On the anomalous temperature dependence of cellulose aqueous solubility2016In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 2375-2387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The solubility of cellulose in water-based media is promoted by low temperature, which may appear counter-intuitive. An explanation to this phenomenon has been proposed that is based on a temperature-dependent orientation of the hydroxymethyl group. In this paper, this hypothesis is investigated using molecular dynamics computer simulations and NMR spectroscopy, and is discussed in conjunction with alternative explanations based on solvent–solute and solvent–solvent hydrogen bond formation respectively. It is shown that neither simulations nor experiments lend support to the proposed mechanism based on the hydroxymethyl orientation, whereas the two alternative explanations give rise to two distinct contributions to the hydration free energy of cellooligomers.

  • 3. Herrera, Martha A.
    et al.
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Oksman, Kristiina
    Barrier and mechanical properties of plasticized and cross-linked nanocellulose coatings for paper packaging applications2017In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 3969-3980Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Barrier, mechanical and thermal properties of porous paper substrates dip-coated with nanocellulose (NC) were studied. Sorbitol plasticizer was used to improve the toughness, and citric acid cross-linker to improve the moisture stability of the coatings. In general, the addition of sorbitol increased the barrier properties, maximum strength and toughness as well as the thermal stability of the samples when compared to the non-modified NC coatings. The barrier properties significantly improved, especially for plasticized NC coating's, where the oxygen permeability value was as low as 0.7 mL mu m day(-1) m(-2) kPa(-1) at 49% RH and the water vapor permeability was reduced by 60%. Furthermore, we found that the cross-linked plasticized NC coating had a smoother surface (50% lower roughness) compared to non-modified ones. This study shows that the environmentally friendly additives sorbitol and citric acid had positive effects on NC coating properties, increasing its potential use in paper-based packaging applications.

  • 4. Hollertz, Rebecca
    et al.
    Arwin, Hans
    Faure, Bertrand
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zhang, Yujia
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Wagberg, Lars
    Dielectric properties of lignin and glucomannan as determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry and Lifshitz estimates of non-retarded Hamaker constants2013In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 1639-1648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present in this study a quantitative estimate of the dispersive interactions between lignin, hemicellulose and cellulose, which are the dominating components in wood and also extensively used to produce paper and packaging materials. The dielectric properties in the UV-visible region of spin-coated films of pure lignin and glucomannan were determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The non-retarded Hamaker constants were estimated from the determined spectral parameters using Lifshitz theory for lignin and glucomannan interacting with cellulose, titania and calcium carbonate in vacuum, water and hexane. The Hamaker constants for the different combinations of cellulose, lignin and glucomannan fall within a relatively narrow range of 35-58 and 8-17 zJ, for the values in vacuum (air) and water, respectively. The estimated Hamaker constants for the interactions of the wood components with TiO2 and CaCO3, common additives in paper, in water range from 3 to 19 zJ, thus being similar in magnitude as the interactions between the wood components themselves. In contrast, the Hamaker constant is essentially zero for glucomannan interacting with calcium carbonate in hexane. The Hamaker constants for lignin, hemicellulose and cellulose determined in this study can provide information regarding the surface interactions important for e.g. adhesion, friction, swelling and wetting in paper processing as well as for the resulting behavior of paper products.

  • 5. Licen, M.
    et al.
    Majaron, B.
    Noh, J.
    Schütz, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg.
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Lagerwall, J.
    Drevensek-Olenik, I.
    Correlation between structural properties and iridescent colors of cellulose nanocrystalline films2016In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 3601-3609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the effect of shear flow applied during the drying of aqueous suspension of cellulose nanocrystals on optical reflective properties and structural characteristics of the resulting solidified films. Shear flow can significantly improve internal structural homogeneity of the films, while its effect on optical reflective properties is relatively minor. The measured width of the selective reflection peak is an order of magnitude larger than expected for an ideal helically modulated structure, which reflects a distribution of pitch values and possibly also of regimes of distorted helical modulation. We attribute these imperfections to the broad size distribution of the cellulose nanocrystals.

  • 6.
    Liu, Yingxin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Sweden.
    Gordeyeva, Korneliya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Steady-shear and viscoelastic properties of cellulose nanofibril-nanoclay dispersions2017In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 1815-1824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have investigated the steady-shear and viscoelastic properties of composite dispersions of cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) with medium or high charge density and two different nanoclays, viz. rodlike sepiolite or plate-like bentonite. Aqueous dispersions of CNFs with medium charge density displayed significantly lower steady-state viscosity and storage modulus but higher gelation threshold compared with CNFs with high charge density. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) results showed that the apparent hydrodynamic radius of bentonite particles increased when CNFs were added, implying that CNFs adsorbed onto the amphoteric edges of the plate-like bentonite particles. The sepiolite network in CNF-sepiolite dispersions was relatively unaffected by addition of small amounts of CNFs, and DLS showed that the hydrodynamic radius of sepiolite did not change when CNFs were added. Addition of CNFs at concentrations above the gelation threshold resulted in drastic decrease of the steady-shear viscosity of the sepiolite dispersion, suggesting that the sepiolite network disintegrates and the rod-like clay particles are aligned also at low shear rate. The relative change in the rheological properties of the clay-based dispersions was always greater on addition of CNFs with high compared with medium charge density. This study provides insight into how the rheology of CNF-nanoclay dispersions depends on both the nanoclay morphology and the interactions between the nanoclay and nanocellulose particles, being of relevance to processing of nanocellulose-clay composites.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf