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  • 1.
    Andersson, Pia
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Alternative Archaeology: Many Pasts in Our Present2012Inngår i: Numen, ISSN 0029-5973, E-ISSN 1568-5276, Vol. 59, nr 2-3, s. 125-137Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article introduces the field of alternative archaeology. After a short presentation of how the field has been received by professional archaeologists, different ways of defining it are discussed, and potential demarcations are examined. A survey of the most frequently discussed topics follows, together with a discussion of the methodologies employed and the theoretical presuppositions accepted by writers in the alternative archaeology genre, and how these differ from the methods and theories of conventional academic archaeology. A brief section on the relevance of alternative archaeology to the study of religion concludes the article.

  • 2.
    Faxneld, Per
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för etnologi, religionshistoria och genusstudier, Religionshistoriska avdelningen.
    Review of Christopher Partridge & Eric Christianson (eds.) The Lure of the Dark Side: Satan and Western Demonology in Popular Culture (2009)2011Inngår i: Numen, ISSN 0029-5973, E-ISSN 1568-5276, Vol. 58, nr 2-3, s. 408-413Artikkel, omtale (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 3.
    Faxneld, Per
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för etnologi, religionshistoria och genusvetenskap, Religionshistoria.
    The Devil is Red: Socialist Satanism in the Nineteenth Century2013Inngår i: Numen, ISSN 0029-5973, E-ISSN 1568-5276, Vol. 60, nr 5-6, s. 528-558Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    During the nineteenth century, socialists all over the Western world employed Satan as a symbol of the workers’ emancipation from capitalist tyranny and the toppling of the Christian Church, which they perceived as a protector of this oppressive system. Starting with the English Romantics at the end of the eighteenth century, European radicals developed a discourse of symbolic Satanism, which was put to use by major names in socialism like Godwin, Proudhon, and Bakunin. This shock tactic became especially widespread in turn-of-the-century Sweden, and accordingly the article focuses on the many examples of explicit socialist Satanism in that country. They are contextualized by showing the parallels to, among other things, use of Lucifer as a positive symbol in the realm of alternative spirituality, specifically the Theosophical Society. A number of reasons for why Satan gained such popularity among socialists are suggested, and the sometimes blurry line separating the rhetoric of symbolic Satanism from actual religious writing is scrutinized.

  • 4.
    Foxeus, Niklas
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för etnologi, religionshistoria och genusvetenskap, Religionshistoria.
    “I am the Buddha, the Buddha is Me”: Concentration Meditation and Esoteric Modern Buddhism in Burma/Myanmar2016Inngår i: Numen, ISSN 0029-5973, E-ISSN 1568-5276, Vol. 63, nr 4, s. 411-445Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In postcolonial Burma, two trends within lay Buddhism — largely in tension with one another — developed into large-scale movements. They focused upon different meditation practices, insight meditation and concentration meditation, with the latter also including esoteric lore. An impetus largely shared by the movements was to define an “authentic” Buddhism to serve as the primary vehicle of the quest for individual, local, and national identity. While insight meditation was generally considered Buddhist meditation par excellence, concentration meditation was ascribed a more dubious Buddhist identity. Given this ambiguity, it could be considered rather paradoxical that concentration meditation could be viewed as a source of “authentic” Buddhism. The aim of this article is to investigate the issue of identity and the paradox of authenticity by examining the concentration meditation practices of one large esoteric congregation and tentatively comparing its practices with those of the insight meditation movement. It will be argued that the movements represented two varieties of so-called modern Buddhism (rationalist modern Buddhism and esoteric modern Buddhism) drawing on different Buddhist imaginaries and representing two main trends that are largely diametrically opposed to one another. They therefore represent two ways of constructing an individual, local, and national identity.

  • 5.
    Granholm, Kennet
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för etnologi, religionshistoria och genusstudier, Religionshistoriska avdelningen.
    "Sons of Northern Darkness": Heathen Influences in Black Metal and Neofolk MusicInngår i: Numen, ISSN 0029-5973, E-ISSN 1568-5276Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 6.
    Jackson, Peter
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för etnologi, religionshistoria och genusvetenskap, Religionshistoria.
    A New Order of the Ages: Eschatological Vision in Virgil and Beyond2012Inngår i: Numen, ISSN 0029-5973, E-ISSN 1568-5276, Vol. 59, nr 5-6, s. 533-544Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Proceeding from the Latin mottoes for the Great Seal of the United States, this paper explores the use and repercussions of eschatological themes in Virgil’s poetry. A hith-herto unnoticed datum in the history of the Great Seal’s final design exemplifies how comparatively recent readings of the myth of Aeneas and the Cumaean Sibyl could inform our understanding of how the same myth was conceived in the Augustan Age. The discussion revolves around topics such as ekphrasis, the conflation of memoir and myth, and the eschatological significance of spatial and temporal transmission. The final part of the paper introduces some new thoughts concerning the ludi tarentini and the centennial life span.

  • 7.
    Jackson, Peter
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för etnologi, religionshistoria och genusvetenskap, Religionshistoria.
    Religious Studies: The Key Concepts. By Carl Olson2013Inngår i: Numen, ISSN 0029-5973, E-ISSN 1568-5276, Vol. 60, nr 1, s. 142-144Artikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 8.
    Karahan, Anne
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kultur och estetik.
    Byzantine Visual Culture: Conditions of "Right" Belief and some Platonic Outlooks2016Inngår i: Numen, ISSN 0029-5973, E-ISSN 1568-5276, Vol. 63, nr 2-3, s. 210-244Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Monumental picture programs of Byzantine churches exist within a spatial and liturgical setting of rituals that depend on circumstances that create a distinction from profane to sacred. The core theme is the epic narrative of the holy drama of the incarnated son, i.e., the image of God (eikon tou theou), acknowledged as indivisibly as much human as divine. In a Byzantine religious sense, images of Christ prove the incarnation, yet human salvation depends on faith in the incarnation but also in the transcendent unknowable God. From the perspective of visual culture, the dilemma is that divine nature is, in a religious sense, transcendent and unknowable, beyond words and categorizations, unintelligible, as opposed to human nature, which is intelligible. This article concerns the strategy of Byzantine visual culture to weave together expressible and inexpressible in order to acknowledge “right belief,” without trespassing the theology and mode of thought of the church fathers on the triune mystery of the Christian God and the incarnation. In a Byzantine religious sense, circumscribed by time and space, the human condition is inconsistent with cognition of what God is. Nonetheless, salvation depends on faith in that God is, a “fact” acknowledged through holy images. Particular theoretical and methodological focus will be on how the three fourth-century Cappadocian fathers and Dionysius the Areopagite, but also Maximus the Confessor discuss God’s unintelligibility but also intelligibility, with some comparative Platonic outlooks.

  • 9.
    Karivieri, Arja
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Antikens kultur och samhällsliv.
    Divine or Human Images? Neoplatonic and Christian Views on Works of Art and Aesthetics2016Inngår i: Numen, ISSN 0029-5973, E-ISSN 1568-5276, Vol. 63, nr 2-3, s. 196-209Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how Neoplatonists and Christians experienced and interpreted works of art, and how views on artists and individual works of art, such as Pheidias' Zeus in Olympia, were expressed by the representatives of traditional Greco-Roman religions and Christians. The way the value of a work of art was expressed in Greco-Roman literature is compared with the comments and opinions of Neoplatonists and Christian authors, which show that art and its appreciation and function are closely connected to the relationship to God in ancient sources. The ideal of beauty took its place to enrich also the Christian view of aesthetics and enhanced the development of both Greco-Roman and Christian art.

  • 10.
    Sundqvist, Olof
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för etnologi, religionshistoria och genusvetenskap.
    Magic and Kingship in Medieval Iceland: The Construction of a Discourse of Political Resistance, written by Nicolas Meylan 2016Inngår i: Numen, ISSN 0029-5973, E-ISSN 1568-5276, Vol. 63, s. 329-333Artikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
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