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  • 1. Aarts, Alexander A.
    et al.
    Nilsonne, Gustav
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Zuni, Kellylynn
    Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science2015In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 349, no 6251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available. Replication effects were half the magnitude of original effects, representing a substantial decline. Ninety-seven percent of original studies had statistically significant results. Thirty-six percent of replications had statistically significant results; 47% of original effect sizes were in the 95% confidence interval of the replication effect size; 39% of effects were subjectively rated to have replicated the original result; and if no bias in original results is assumed, combining original and replication results left 68% with statistically significant effects. Correlational tests suggest that replication success was better predicted by the strength of original evidence than by characteristics of the original and replication teams.

  • 2. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Allafort, A.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Berenji, B.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bouvier, A.
    Brandt, T. J.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brez, A.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Cannon, A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Celik, O.
    Charles, E.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Costamante, L.
    Cutini, S.
    D'Ammando, F.
    Dermer, C. D.
    de Angelis, A.
    de Luca, A.
    de Palma, F.
    Digel, S. W.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Drlica-Wagner, A.
    Dubois, R.
    Dumora, D.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Ferrara, E. C.
    Focke, W. B.
    Fortin, P.
    Frailis, M.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Funk, S.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gasparrini, D.
    Gehrels, N.
    Germani, S.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giordano, F.
    Giroletti, M.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grondin, M. -H
    Grove, J. E.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hadasch, D.
    Hanabata, Y.
    Harding, A. K.
    Hayashi, K.
    Hayashida, M.
    Hays, E.
    Horan, D.
    Itoh, R.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, T. J.
    Khangulyan, D.
    Kamae, T.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Kerr, M.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Latronico, L.
    Lee, S. -H
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lubrano, P.
    Madejski, G. M.
    Makeev, A.
    Marelli, M.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Nakamori, T.
    Naumann-Godo, M.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Okumura, A.
    Omodei, N.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Ozaki, M.
    Paneque, D.
    Parent, D.
    Pelassa, V.
    Pepe, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Pierbattista, M.
    Piron, F.
    Porter, T. A.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Ray, P. S.
    Razzano, M.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reposeur, T.
    Ritz, S.
    Romani, R. W.
    Sadrozinski, H. F. -W
    Sanchez, D.
    Parkinson, P. M. Saz
    Scargle, J. D.
    Schalk, T. L.
    Sgro, C.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Smith, P. D.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Strickman, M. S.
    Suson, D. J.
    Takahashi, H.
    Takahashi, T.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Tramacere, A.
    Troja, E.
    Uchiyama, Y.
    Vandenbroucke, J.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vianello, G.
    Vitale, V.
    Wang, P.
    Wood, K. S.
    Yang, Zhaoyu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ziegler, M.
    Gamma-Ray Flares from the Crab Nebula2011In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 331, no 6018, p. 739-742Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A young and energetic pulsar powers the well-known Crab Nebula. Here, we describe two separate gamma-ray (photon energy greater than 100 mega-electron volts) flares from this source detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The first flare occurred in February 2009 and lasted approximately 16 days. The second flare was detected in September 2010 and lasted approximately 4 days. During these outbursts, the gamma-ray flux from the nebula increased by factors of four and six, respectively. The brevity of the flares implies that the gamma rays were emitted via synchrotron radiation from peta-electron-volt (10(15) electron volts) electrons in a region smaller than 1.4 x 10(-2) parsecs. These are the highest-energy particles that can be associated with a discrete astronomical source, and they pose challenges to particle acceleration theory.

  • 3. Abdo, A., et al
    et al.
    Axelsson, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Conrad, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Meurer, Christine
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    The Fermi LAT Collboration,
    The Fermi GBM Collaboration,
    Fermi Observations of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from GRB 080916C2009In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 323, no 5922, p. 1688-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are highly energetic explosions signaling the death of massive stars in distant galaxies. The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Observatory together record GRBs over a broad energy range spanning about 7 decades of gammaray energy. In September 2008, Fermi observed the exceptionally luminous GRB 080916C, with the largest apparent energy release yet measured. The high-energy gamma rays are observed to start later and persist longer than the lower energy photons. A simple spectral form fits the entire GRB spectrum, providing strong constraints on emission models. The known distance of the burst enables placing lower limits on the bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow and on the quantum gravity mass.

  • 4. Abramowski, A.
    et al.
    Aharonian, F.
    Benkhali, F. Ait
    Akhperjanian, A. G.
    Anguener, E. O.
    Backes, M.
    Balenderan, S.
    Balzer, A.
    Barnacka, A.
    Becherini, Y.
    Becker-Tjus, J.
    Berge, D.
    Bernhard, S.
    Bernloehr, K.
    Birsin, E.
    Biteau, J.
    Boettcher, M.
    Boisson, C.
    Bolmont, J.
    Bordas, P.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brun, F.
    Brun, P.
    Bryan, M.
    Bulik, T.
    Carrigan, S.
    Casanova, S.
    Chadwick, P. M.
    Chakraborty, N.
    Chalme-Calvet, R.
    Chaves, R. C. G.
    Chretien, M.
    Colafrancesco, S.
    Cologna, G.
    Conrad, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Couturier, C.
    Cui, Y.
    Dalton, M.
    Davids, I. D.
    Degrange, B.
    Deil, C.
    de Wilt, P.
    Djannati-Atai, A.
    Domainko, W.
    Donath, A.
    Drury, L. O 'C.
    Dubus, G.
    Dutson, K.
    Dyks, J.
    Dyrda, M.
    Edwards, T.
    Egberts, K.
    Eger, P.
    Espigat, P.
    Farnier, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Fegan, S.
    Feinstein, F.
    Fernandes, M. V.
    Fernandez, D.
    Fiasson, A.
    Fontaine, G.
    Foerster, A.
    Fuessling, M.
    Gabici, S.
    Gajdus, M.
    Gallant, Y. A.
    Garrigoux, T.
    Giavitto, G.
    Giebels, B.
    Glicenstein, J. F.
    Gottschall, D.
    Grondin, M-H
    Grudzinska, M.
    Hadasch, D.
    Haeffner, S.
    Hahn, J.
    Harris, J.
    Heinzelmann, G.
    Henri, G.
    Hermann, G.
    Hervet, O.
    Hillert, A.
    Hinton, J. A.
    Hofmann, W.
    Hofverberg, P.
    Holler, M.
    Horns, D.
    Ivascenko, A.
    Jacholkowska, A.
    Jahn, C.
    Jamrozy, M.
    Janiak, M.
    Jankowsky, F.
    Jung, I.
    Kastendieck, M. A.
    Katarzynski, K.
    Katz, U.
    Kaufmann, S.
    Khelifi, B.
    Kieffer, M.
    Klepser, S.
    Klochkov, D.
    Kluzniak, W.
    Kolitzus, D.
    Komin, Nu.
    Kosack, K.
    Krakau, S.
    Krayzel, F.
    Krueger, P. P.
    Laffon, H.
    Lamanna, G.
    Lefaucheur, J.
    Lefranc, V.
    Lemiere, A.
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Lenain, J-P
    Lohse, T.
    Lopatin, A.
    Lu, C-C
    Marandon, V.
    Marcowith, A.
    Marx, R.
    Maurin, G.
    Maxted, N.
    Mayer, M.
    McComb, T. J. L.
    Mehault, J.
    Meintjes, P. J.
    Menzler, U.
    Meyer, Manuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Mitchell, A. M. W.
    Moderski, R.
    Mohamed, M.
    Morå, Knut
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moulin, E.
    Murach, T.
    de Naurois, M.
    Niemiec, J.
    Nolan, S. J.
    Oakes, L.
    Odaka, H.
    Ohm, S.
    Opitz, B.
    Ostrowski, M.
    Oya, I.
    Panter, M.
    Parsons, R. D.
    Arribas, M. Paz
    Pekeur, N. W.
    Pelletier, G.
    Perez, J.
    Petrucci, P-O
    Peyaud, B.
    Pita, S.
    Poon, H.
    Puehlhofer, G.
    Punch, M.
    Quirrenbach, A.
    Raab, S.
    Reichardt, I.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Renaud, M.
    de los Reyes, R.
    Rieger, F.
    Rob, L.
    Romoli, C.
    Rosier-Lees, S.
    Rowell, G.
    Rudak, B.
    Rulten, C. B.
    Sahakian, V.
    Salek, D.
    Sanchez, D. A.
    Santangelo, A.
    Schlickeiser, R.
    Schuessler, F.
    Schulz, A.
    Schwanke, U.
    Schwarzburg, S.
    Schwemmer, S.
    Sol, H.
    Spanier, F.
    Spengler, Gerrit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Spies, F.
    Stawarz, L.
    Steenkamp, R.
    Stegmann, C.
    Stinzing, F.
    Stycz, K.
    Sushch, I.
    Tavernet, J-P
    Tavernier, T.
    Taylor, A. M.
    Terrier, R.
    Tluczykont, M.
    Trichard, C.
    Valerius, K.
    van Eldik, C.
    van Soelen, B.
    Vasileiadis, G.
    Veh, J.
    Venter, C.
    Viana, A.
    Vincent, P.
    Vink, J.
    Voelk, H. J.
    Volpe, F.
    Vorster, M.
    Vuillaume, T.
    Wagner, S. J.
    Wagner, P.
    Wagner, Robert M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ward, M.
    Weidinger, M.
    Weitzel, Q.
    White, R.
    Wierzcholska, A.
    Willmann, P.
    Woernlein, A.
    Wouters, D.
    Yang, R.
    Zabalza, V.
    Zaborov, D.
    Zacharias, M.
    Zdziarski, A. A.
    Zech, A.
    Zechlin, H-S
    The exceptionally powerful TeV gamma-ray emitters in the Large Magellanic Cloud2015In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 347, no 6220, p. 406-412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way, has been observed with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) above an energy of 100 billion electron volts for a deep exposure of 210 hours. Three sources of different types were detected: the pulsar wind nebula of the most energetic pulsar known, N 157B; the radio-loud supernova remnant N 132D; and the largest nonthermal x-ray shell, the superbubble 30 Dor C. The unique object SN 1987A is, unexpectedly, not detected, which constrains the theoretical framework of particle acceleration in very young supernova remnants. These detections reveal the most energetic tip of a g-ray source population in an external galaxy and provide via 30 Dor C the unambiguous detection of g-ray emission from a superbubble.

  • 5. Ackermann, M.
    et al.
    Ajello, M.
    Albert, A.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Bissaldi, E.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bottacini, E.
    Brandt, T. J.
    Bregeon, J.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caragiulo, M.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Cavazzuti, E.
    Charles, E.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Chiaro, G.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Conrad, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Corbel, S.
    D'Ammando, F.
    de Angelis, A.
    den Hartog, P. R.
    de Palma, F.
    Dermer, C. D.
    Desiante, R.
    Digel, S. W.
    Di Venere, L.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Donato, D.
    Drell, P. S.
    Drlica-Wagner, A.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Ferrara, E. C.
    Focke, W. B.
    Franckowiak, A.
    Fuhrmann, L.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gasparrini, D.
    Germani, S.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giordano, F.
    Giroletti, M.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grove, J. E.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hadasch, D.
    Harding, A. K.
    Hayashida, M.
    Hays, E.
    Hewitt, J. W.
    Hill, A. B.
    Hou, X.
    Jean, P.
    Jogler, T.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Kerr, M.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Larsson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Latronico, L.
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Manfreda, A.
    Martin, P.
    Massaro, F.
    Mayer, M.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Nemmen, R.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Omodei, N.
    Orienti, M.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Paneque, D.
    Panetta, J. H.
    Perkins, J. S.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Pivato, G.
    Porter, T. A.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Razzaque, S.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reposeur, T.
    Parkinson, P. M. Saz
    Schaal, M.
    Schulz, A.
    Sgro, C.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Stawarz, L.
    Suson, D. J.
    Takahashi, H.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Tinivella, M.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Troja, E.
    Uchiyama, Y.
    Vianello, G.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wolff, M. T.
    Wood, D. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Wood, M.
    Charbonnel, S.
    Corbet, R. H. D.
    Aquino, I. De Gennaro
    Edlin, J. P.
    Mason, E.
    Schwarz, G. J.
    Shore, S. N.
    Starrfield, S.
    Teyssier, F.
    Fermi establishes classical novae as a distinct class of gamma-ray sources2014In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 345, no 6196, p. 554-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A classical nova results from runaway thermonuclear explosions on the surface of a white dwarf that accretes matter from a low-mass main-sequence stellar companion. In 2012 and 2013, three novae were detected in gamma rays and stood in contrast to the first gamma-ray-detected nova V407 Cygni 2010, which belongs to a rare class of symbiotic binary systems. Despite likely differences in the compositions and masses of their white dwarf progenitors, the three classical novae are similarly characterized as soft-spectrum transient gamma-ray sources detected over 2- to 3-week durations. The gamma-ray detections point to unexpected high-energy particle acceleration processes linked to the mass ejection from thermonuclear explosions in an unanticipated class of Galactic gamma-ray sources.

  • 6. Ackermann, M.
    et al.
    Ajello, M.
    Allafort, A.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Baring, M. G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bottacini, E.
    Brandt, T. J.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Busetto, G.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Cecchi, C.
    Celik, O.
    Charles, E.
    Chaty, S.
    Chaves, R. C. G.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Chiaro, G.
    Cillis, A. N.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Cominsky, L. R.
    Conrad, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Corbel, S.
    Cutini, S.
    D'Ammando, F.
    de Angelis, A.
    de Palma, F.
    Dermer, C. D.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Drlica-Wagner, A.
    Falletti, L.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Ferrara, E. C.
    Franckowiak, A.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Funk, S.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Germani, S.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giommi, P.
    Giordano, F.
    Giroletti, M.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grondin, M. -H
    Grove, J. E.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hadasch, D.
    Hanabata, Y.
    Harding, A. K.
    Hayashida, M.
    Hayashi, K.
    Hays, E.
    Hewitt, J. W.
    Hill, A. B.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Jackson, M. S.
    Jogler, T.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Kamae, T.
    Kataoka, J.
    Katsuta, J.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Larsson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Latronico, L.
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Madejski, G. M.
    Massaro, F.
    Mayer, M.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Mehault, J.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mignani, R. P.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Nakamori, T.
    Nemmen, R.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohno, M.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Omodei, N.
    Orienti, M.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Paneque, D.
    Perkins, J. S.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Pivato, G.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Razzaque, S.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Ritz, S.
    Romoli, C.
    Sanchez-Conde, M.
    Schulz, A.
    Sgro, C.
    Simeon, P. E.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Smith, D. A.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Stecker, F. W.
    Strong, A. W.
    Suson, D. J.
    Tajima, H.
    Takahashi, H.
    Takahashi, T.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Thorsett, S. E.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Tibolla, O.
    Tinivella, M.
    Troja, E.
    Uchiyama, Y.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vandenbroucke, J.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vianello, G.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Werner, M.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Wood, M.
    Yamazaki, R.
    Yang, Zhaoyu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Zimmer, Stephan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Detection of the Characteristic Pion-Decay Signature in Supernova Remnants2013In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 339, no 6121, p. 807-811Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cosmic rays are particles (mostly protons) accelerated to relativistic speeds. Despite wide agreement that supernova remnants (SNRs) are the sources of galactic cosmic rays, unequivocal evidence for the acceleration of protons in these objects is still lacking. When accelerated protons encounter interstellar material, they produce neutral pions, which in turn decay into gamma rays. This offers a compelling way to detect the acceleration sites of protons. The identification of pion-decay gamma rays has been difficult because high-energy electrons also produce gamma rays via bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton scattering. We detected the characteristic pion-decay feature in the gamma-ray spectra of two SNRs, IC 443 and W44, with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. This detection provides direct evidence that cosmic-ray protons are accelerated in SNRs.

  • 7. Ackermann, M.
    et al.
    Ajello, M.
    Allafort, A.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Belfiore, A.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Berenji, B.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bottacini, E.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Cecchi, C.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    de Angelis, A.
    de Palma, F.
    Dermer, C. D.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Dumora, D.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Focke, W. B.
    Fortin, P.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Germani, S.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giordano, F.
    Giroletti, M.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Guillemot, L.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hadasch, D.
    Hanabata, Y.
    Harding, A. K.
    Hayashida, M.
    Hayashi, K.
    Hays, E.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Kamae, T.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Kerr, M.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Latronico, L.
    Lee, S. -H
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Martin, P.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Mehault, J.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Naumann-Godo, M.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Okumura, A.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Ozaki, M.
    Paneque, D.
    Parent, D.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Pierbattista, M.
    Piron, F.
    Pohl, M.
    Prokhorov, D.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Reposeur, T.
    Ritz, S.
    Parkinson, P. M. Saz
    Sgro, C.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Smith, P. D.
    Spinelli, P.
    Strong, A. W.
    Takahashi, H.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Tramacere, A.
    Troja, E.
    Uchiyama, Y.
    Vandenbroucke, J.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vianello, G.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wang, P.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Yang, Zhaoyu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Zimmer, Stephan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bontemps, S.
    A Cocoon of Freshly Accelerated Cosmic Rays Detected by Fermi in the Cygnus Superbubble2011In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 334, no 6059, p. 1103-1107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The origin of Galactic cosmic rays is a century-long puzzle. Indirect evidence points to their acceleration by supernova shockwaves, but we know little of their escape from the shock and their evolution through the turbulent medium surrounding massive stars. Gamma rays can probe their spreading through the ambient gas and radiation fields. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has observed the star-forming region of Cygnus X. The 1- to 100-gigaelectronvolt images reveal a 50-parsec-wide cocoon of freshly accelerated cosmic rays that flood the cavities carved by the stellar winds and ionization fronts from young stellar clusters. It provides an example to study the youth of cosmic rays in a superbubble environment before they merge into the older Galactic population.

  • 8. Ackermann, M.
    et al.
    Ajello, M.
    Allafort, A.
    Schady, P.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bottacini, E.
    Bouvier, A.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Cavazzuti, E.
    Cecchi, C.
    Charles, E.
    Chaves, R. C. G.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Chiaro, G.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Conrad, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Cutini, S.
    D'Ammando, F.
    de Palma, F.
    Dermer, C. D.
    Digel, S. W.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Domnguez, A.
    Drell, P. S.
    Drlica-Wagner, A.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Focke, W. B.
    Franckowiak, A.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Funk, S.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gasparrini, D.
    Gehrels, N.
    Germani, S.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giordano, F.
    Giroletti, M.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grove, J. E.
    Guiriec, S.
    Gustafsson, M.
    Hadasch, D.
    Hayashida, M.
    Hays, E.
    Jackson, M. S.
    Jogler, T.
    Kataoka, J.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Larsson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Latronico, L.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Mehault, J.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mizuno, T.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Tramacere, A.
    Nuss, E.
    Greiner, J.
    Ohno, M.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Omodei, N.
    Orienti, M.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Paneque, D.
    Perkins, J. S.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Pivato, G.
    Porter, T. A.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Razzaque, S.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reyes, L. C.
    Ritz, S.
    Rau, A.
    Romoli, C.
    Roth, M.
    Sanchez-Conde, M.
    Sanchez, D. A.
    Scargle, J. D.
    Sgro, C.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Stawarz, Lukasz
    Suson, D. J.
    Takahashi, H.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Tinivella, M.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Troja, E.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vandenbroucke, J.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vianello, G.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Wood, M.
    The Imprint of the Extragalactic Background Light in the Gamma-Ray Spectra of Blazars2012In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 338, no 6111, p. 1190-1192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The light emitted by stars and accreting compact objects through the history of the universe is encoded in the intensity of the extragalactic background light (EBL). Knowledge of the EBL is important to understand the nature of star formation and galaxy evolution, but direct measurements of the EBL are limited by galactic and other foreground emissions. Here, we report an absorption feature seen in the combined spectra of a sample of gamma-ray blazars out to a redshift of z similar to 1.6. This feature is caused by attenuation of gamma rays by the EBL at optical to ultraviolet frequencies and allowed us to measure the EBL flux density in this frequency band.

  • 9. Ackermann, M.
    et al.
    Ajello, M.
    Asano, K.
    Atwood, W. B.
    Axelsson, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Baring, M. G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Bissaldi, E.
    Bonamente, E.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Burgess, J. Michael
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Cecchi, C.
    Chaplin, V.
    Charles, E.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Chiaro, G.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cleveland, W.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Collazzi, A.
    Cominsky, L. R.
    Connaughton, V.
    Conrad, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Cutini, S.
    D'Ammando, F.
    de Angelis, A.
    DeKlotz, M.
    de Palma, F.
    Dermer, C. D.
    Desiante, R.
    Diekmann, A.
    Di Venere, L.
    Drell, P. S.
    Drlica-Wagner, A.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Ferrara, E. C.
    Finke, J.
    Fitzpatrick, G.
    Focke, W. B.
    Franckowiak, A.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Funk, S.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gehrels, N.
    Germani, S.
    Gibby, M.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giles, M.
    Giordano, F.
    Giroletti, M.
    Godfrey, G.
    Granot, J.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grove, J. E.
    Gruber, D.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hadasch, D.
    Hanabata, Y.
    Harding, A. K.
    Hayashida, M.
    Hays, E.
    Horan, D.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Inoue, Y.
    Jogler, T.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Kawano, T.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kocevski, D.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Larsson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Latronico, L.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Mayer, M.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Moretti, E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Nemmen, R.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohno, M.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Okumura, A.
    Omodei, N.
    Orienti, M.
    Paneque, D.
    Pelassa, V.
    Perkins, J. S.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Petrosian, V.
    Piron, F.
    Pivato, G.
    Porter, T. A.
    Racusin, J. L.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Razzaque, S.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Ritz, S.
    Roth, M.
    Ryde, F.
    Sartori, A.
    Parkinson, P. M. Saz
    Scargle, J. D.
    Schulz, A.
    Sgro, C.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Sonbas, E.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Tajima, H.
    Takahashi, H.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Tinivella, M.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Troja, E.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vandenbroucke, J.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vianello, G.
    Vitale, V.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Yamazaki, R.
    Younes, G.
    Yu, H. -F
    Zhu, S. J.
    Bhat, P. N.
    Briggs, M. S.
    Byrne, D.
    Foley, S.
    Goldstein, A.
    Jenke, P.
    Kippen, R. M.
    Kouveliotou, C.
    McBreen, S.
    Meegan, C.
    Paciesas, W. S.
    Preece, R.
    Rau, A.
    Tierney, D.
    van der Horst, A. J.
    von Kienlin, A.
    Wilson-Hodge, C.
    Xiong, S.
    Cusumano, G.
    La Parola, V.
    Cummings, J. R.
    Fermi-LAT Observations of the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A2014In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 343, no 6166, p. 42-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The observations of the exceptionally bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A by the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provide constraints on the nature of these unique astrophysical sources. GRB 130427A had the largest fluence, highest-energy photon (95 GeV), longest gamma-ray duration (20 hours), and one of the largest isotropic energy releases ever observed from a GRB. Temporal and spectral analyses of GRB 130427A challenge the widely accepted model that the nonthermal high-energy emission in the afterglow phase of GRBs is synchrotron emission radiated by electrons accelerated at an external shock.

  • 10.
    Ahrens, Maryon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Conrad, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Dumm, Jonathan P.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Finley, Chad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Flis, Samuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hultqvist, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    O'Sullivan, Erin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Walck, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Jóhannesson, Guðlaugur
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Wagner, Robert M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Multimessenger observations of a flaring blazar coincident with high-energy neutrino IceCube-170922A2018In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 361, no 6398, article id 1378Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Ahrens, Maryon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Dumm, Jonathan P.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Finley, Chad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Flis, Samuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hultqvist, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    O'Sullivan, Erin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Walck, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Neutrino emission from the direction of the blazar TXS 0506+056 prior to the IceCube-170922A alert2018In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 361, no 6398, p. 147-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A high-energy neutrino event detected by IceCube on 22 September 2017 was coincident in direction and time with a gamma-ray flare from the blazar TXS 0506+056. Prompted by this association, we investigated 9.5 years of IceCube neutrino observations to search for excess emission at the position of the blazar. We found an excess of high-energy neutrino events, with respect to atmospheric backgrounds, at that position between September 2014 and March 2015. Allowing for time-variable flux, this constitutes 3.5 sigma evidence for neutrino emission from the direction of TXS 0506+056, independent of and prior to the 2017 flaring episode. This suggests that blazars are identifiable sources of the high-energy astrophysical neutrino flux.

  • 12. Anderson, Christopher J.
    et al.
    Bahník, Štěpán
    Barnett-Cowan, Michael
    Bosco, Frank A.
    Chandler, Jesse
    Chartier, Christopher R.
    Cheung, Felix
    Christopherson, Cody D.
    Cordes, Andreas
    Cremata, Edward J.
    Della Penna, Nicolas
    Estel, Vivien
    Fedor, Anna
    Fitneva, Stanka A.
    Frank, Michael C.
    Grange, James A.
    Hartshorne, Joshua K.
    Hasselman, Fred
    Henninger, Felix
    van der Hulst, Marije
    Jonas, Kai J.
    Lai, Calvin K.
    Levitan, Carmel A.
    Miller, Jeremy K.
    Moore, Katherine S.
    Meixner, Johannes M.
    Munafò, Marcus R.
    Neijenhuijs, Koen I.
    Nilsonne, Gustav
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Nosek, Brian A.
    Plessow, Franziska
    Prenoveau, Jason M.
    Ricker, Ashley A.
    Schmidt, Kathleen
    Spies, Jeffrey R.
    Stieger, Stefan
    Strohminger, Nina
    Sullivan, Gavin B.
    van Aert, Robbie C. M.
    van Assen, Marcel A. L. M.
    Vanpaemel, Wolf
    Vianello, Michelangelo
    Voracek, Martin
    Zuni, Kellylynn
    Response to Comment on "Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science"2016In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 351, no 6277, article id 1037Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Gilbert et al. conclude that evidence from the Open Science Collaboration's Reproducibility Project: Psychology indicates high reproducibility, given the study methodology. Their very optimistic assessment is limited by statistical misconceptions and by causal inferences from selectively interpreted, correlational data. Using the Reproducibility Project: Psychology data, both optimistic and pessimistic conclusions about reproducibility are possible, and neither are yet warranted.

  • 13. Barlow, M. J.
    et al.
    Swinyard, B. M.
    Owen, P. J.
    Cernicharo, J.
    Gomez, H. L.
    Ivison, R. J.
    Krause, O.
    Lim, T. L.
    Matsuura, M.
    Miller, S.
    Olofsson, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Polehampton, E. T.
    Detection of a Noble Gas Molecular Ion, (ArH+)-Ar-36, in the Crab Nebula2013In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 342, no 6164, p. 1343-1345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Noble gas molecules have not hitherto been detected in space. From spectra obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory, we report the detection of emission in the 617.5- and 1234.6-gigahertz J = 1-0 and 2-1 rotational lines of (ArH+)-Ar-36 at several positions in the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant known to contain both molecular hydrogen and regions of enhanced ionized argon emission. Argon-36 is believed to have originated from explosive nucleosynthesis in massive stars during core-collapse supernova events. Its detection in the Crab Nebula, the product of such a supernova event, confirms this expectation. The likely excitation mechanism for the observed (ArH+)-Ar-36 emission lines is electron collisions in partially ionized regions with electron densities of a few hundred per centimeter cubed.

  • 14. Barreda, V. D.
    et al.
    Palazzesi, L.
    Telleria, M. C.
    Katinas, L.
    Crisci, J. V.
    Bremer, Kåre
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    Passalia, M. G.
    Corsolini, R.
    Rodriguez Brizuela, R.
    Bechis, F.
    Eocene Patagonia Fossils of the Daisy Family2010In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 329, no 5999, p. 1621-1621Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15. Bastviken, David
    et al.
    Tranvik, Lars J.
    Downing, John A.
    Crill, Patrick M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Enrich-Prast, Alex
    Freshwater Methane Emissions Offset the Continental Carbon Sink2011In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 331, no 6013, p. 50-50Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Bodin, Örjan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Collaborative environmental governance: Achieving collective action in social-ecological systems2017In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 357, no 6352, p. 659-+Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Managing ecosystems is challenging because of the high number of stakeholders, the permeability of man-made political and jurisdictional demarcations in relation to the temporal and spatial extent of biophysical processes, and a limited understanding of complex ecosystem and societal dynamics. Given these conditions, collaborative governance is commonly put forward as the preferred means of addressing environmental problems. Under this paradigm, a deeper understanding of if, when, and how collaboration is effective, and when other means of addressing environmental problems are better suited, is needed. Interdisciplinary research on collaborative networks demonstrates that which actors get involved, with whom they collaborate, and in what ways they are tied to the structures of the ecosystems have profound implications on actors' abilities to address different types of environmental problems.

  • 17.
    Bohm, Christian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Danninger, Matthias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Finley, Chad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Flis, Samuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hulth, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hultqvist, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Walck, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Wolf, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Zoll, Marcel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Evidence for High-Energy Extraterrestrial Neutrinos at the IceCube Detector2013In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 342, no 6161, p. 947-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on results of an all-sky search for high-energy neutrino events interacting within the IceCube neutrino detector conducted between May 2010 and May 2012. The search follows up on the previous detection of two PeV neutrino events, with improved sensitivity and extended energy coverage down to about 30 TeV. Twenty-six additional events were observed, substantially more than expected from atmospheric backgrounds. Combined, both searches reject a purely atmospheric origin for the 28 events at the 4 sigma level. These 28 events, which include the highest energy neutrinos ever observed, have flavors, directions, and energies inconsistent with those expected from the atmospheric muon and neutrino backgrounds. These properties are, however, consistent with generic predictions for an additional component of extraterrestrial origin.

  • 18.
    Bäckman, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Nyberg, Lars
    Soveri, Anna
    Johansson, Jarkko
    Andersson, Micael
    Dahlin, Erika
    Neely, Anna S.
    Virta, Jere
    Laine, Matti
    Rinne, Juha O.
    Effects of working-memory training on striatal dopamine release2011In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 333, no 6043, p. 718-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Updating of working memory has been associated with striato-frontal brain regions and phasic dopaminergic neurotransmission. We assessed raclopride binding to striatal dopamine (DA) D2 receptors during a letter-updating task and a control condition before and after 5 weeks of updating training. Results showed that updating affected DA activity before training and that training further increased striatal DA release during updating. These findings highlight the pivotal role of transient neural processes associated with D2 receptor activity in working memory.

  • 19. Clark, Peter, U.
    et al.
    Dyke, A. S.
    Shakun, J. D.
    Carlson, A. E.
    Clark, A. E.
    Wohlfarth, Barbara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geology and Geochemistry.
    Mitrovica, J. X.
    Hostetler, S. W.
    McCabe, A. M.
    The Last Glacial Maximum2009In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 325, no 5941, p. 710-714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used 5704 14C, 10Be, and 3He ages that span the interval from 10,000 to 50,000 years ago (10 to 50 ka) to constrain the timing of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in terms of global ice-sheet and mountain-glacier extent. Growth of the ice sheets to their maximum positions occurred between 33.0 and 26.5 ka in response to climate forcing from decreases in northern summer insolation, tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures, and atmospheric CO2. Nearly all ice sheets were at their LGM positions from 26.5 ka to 19 to 20 ka, corresponding to minima in these forcings. The onset of Northern Hemisphere deglaciation 19 to 20 ka was induced by an increase in northern summer insolation, providing the source for an abrupt rise in sea level. The onset of deglaciation of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet occurred between 14 and 15 ka, consistent with evidence that this was the primary source for an abrupt rise in sea level ~14.5 ka.

  • 20. Datta, Shuvo Jit
    et al.
    Khumnoon, Chutharat
    Lee, Zhen Hao
    Moon, Won Kyung
    Docao, Son
    Nguyen, Thanh Huu
    Hwang, In Chul
    Moon, Dohyun
    Oleynikov, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Terasaki, Osamu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Graduate School of EEWS, KAIST, Korea; ShanghaiTech University, China.
    Yoon, Kyung Byung
    CO2 capture from humid flue gases and humid atmosphere using a microporous coppersilicate2015In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 350, no 6258, p. 302-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Capturing CO2 from humid flue gases and atmosphere with porous materials remains costly because prior dehydration of the gases is required. A large number of microporous materials with physical adsorption capacity have been developed as CO2-capturing materials. However, most of them suffer from CO2 sorption capacity reduction or structure decomposition that is caused by co-adsorbed H2O when exposed to humid flue gases and atmosphere. We report a highly stable microporous coppersilicate. It has H2O-specific and CO2-specific adsorption sites but does not have H2O/CO2-sharing sites. Therefore, it readily adsorbs both H2O and CO2 from the humid flue gases and atmosphere, but the adsorbing H2O does not interfere with the adsorption of CO2. It is also highly stable after adsorption of H2O and CO2 because it was synthesized hydrothermally.

  • 21. Dell'Angela, M.
    et al.
    Anniyev, T.
    Beye, M.
    Coffee, R.
    Foehlisch, A.
    Gladh, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Katayama, T.
    Kaya, S.
    Krupin, O.
    LaRue, J.
    Mogelhoj, A.
    Nordlund, D.
    Norskov, J. K.
    Öberg, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Ogasawara, H.
    Öström, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Pettersson, Lars G. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Schlotter, W. F.
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Sorgenfrei, F.
    Turner, J. J.
    Wolf, M.
    Wurth, W.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Real-Time Observation of Surface Bond Breaking with an X-ray Laser2013In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 339, no 6125, p. 1302-1305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron x-ray laser to probe the electronic structure of CO molecules as their chemisorption state on Ru(0001) changes upon exciting the substrate by using a femtosecond optical laser pulse. We observed electronic structure changes that are consistent with a weakening of the CO interaction with the substrate but without notable desorption. A large fraction of the molecules (30%) was trapped in a transient precursor state that would precede desorption. We calculated the free energy of the molecule as a function of the desorption reaction coordinate using density functional theory, including van der Waals interactions. Two distinct adsorption wells-chemisorbed and precursor state separated by an entropy barrier-explain the anomalously high prefactors often observed in desorption of molecules from metals.

  • 22. Deng, Hexiang
    et al.
    Grunder, Sergio
    Cordova, Kyle E.
    Valente, Cory
    Furukawa, Hiroyasu
    Hmadeh, Mohamad
    Gandara, Felipe
    Whalley, Adam C.
    Liu, Zheng
    Asahina, Shunsuke
    Kazumori, Hiroyoshi
    O'Keeffe, Michael
    Terasaki, Osamu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Stoddart, J. Fraser
    Yaghi, Omar M.
    Large pore apertures in a series of metal organic frameworks2012In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 336, no 6084, p. 1018-1023Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a strategy to expand the pore aperture of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) into a previously unattained size regime (>32 angstroms). Specifically, the systematic expansion of a well-known MOF structure, MOF-74, from its original link of one phenylene ring (I) to two, three, four, five, six, seven, nine, and eleven (II to XI, respectively), afforded an isoreticular series of MOF-74 structures (termed IRMOF-74-I to XI) with pore apertures ranging from 14 to 98 angstroms. All members of this series have non-interpenetrating structures and exhibit robust architectures, as evidenced by their permanent porosity and high thermal stability (up to 300 degrees C). The pore apertures of an oligoethylene glycol-functionalized IRMOF-74-VII and IRMOF-74-IX are large enough for natural proteins to enter the pores.

  • 23. Desai, Nirupa
    et al.
    Brown, Alan
    Amunts, Alexey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, UK.
    Ramakrishnan, V.
    The structure of the yeast mitochondrial ribosome2017In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 355, no 6324, p. 528-531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mitochondria have specialized ribosomes (mitoribosomes) dedicated to the expression of the genetic information encoded by their genomes. Here, using electron cryomicroscopy, we have determined the structure of the 75-component yeast mitoribosome to an overall resolution of 3.3 angstroms. The mitoribosomal small subunit has been built de novo and includes 15S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and 34 proteins, including 14 without homologs in the evolutionarily related bacterial ribosome. Yeast-specific rRNA and protein elements, including the acquisition of a putatively active enzyme, give the mitoribosome a distinct architecture compared to the mammalian mitoribosome. At an expanded messenger RNA channel exit, there is a binding platform for translational activators that regulate translation in yeast but not mammalian mitochondria. The structure provides insights into the evolution and species-specific specialization of mitochondrial translation.

  • 24. Diehl, Roland
    et al.
    Siegert, Thomas
    Hillebrandt, Wolfgang
    Grebenev, Sergei A.
    Greiner, Jochen
    Krause, Martin
    Kromer, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Maeda, Keiichi
    Roepke, Friedrich
    Taubenberger, Stefan
    Early Ni-56 decay gamma rays from SN2014J suggest an unusual explosion2014In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 345, no 6201, p. 1162-1165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type Ia supernovae result from binary systems that include a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, and these thermonuclear explosions typically produce 0.5 solar mass of radioactive Ni-56. The Ni-56 is commonly believed to be buried deeply in the expanding supernova cloud. In SN2014J, we detected the lines at 158 and 812 kiloelectron volts from Ni-56 decay (time similar to 8.8 days) earlier than the expected several-week time scale, only similar to 20 days after the explosion and with flux levels corresponding to roughly 10% of the total expected amount of Ni-56. Some mechanism must break the spherical symmetry of the supernova and at the same time create a major amount of Ni-56 at the outskirts. A plausible explanation is that a belt of helium from the companion star is accreted by the white dwarf, where this material explodes and then triggers the supernova event.

  • 25.
    Emami, S. Noushin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Bo G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Hua, Susanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Hill, Sharon R.
    Mozuraitis, Raimondas
    Lehmann, Philipp
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Birgersson, Göran
    Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin
    Ignell, Rickard
    Faye, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    A key malaria metabolite modulates vector blood seeking, feeding, and susceptibility to infection2017In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 355, no 6329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Malaria infection renders humans more attractive to Anopheles gambiae sensu lato mosquitoes than uninfected people. The mechanisms remain unknown. We found that an isoprenoid precursor produced by Plasmodium falciparum, (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMBPP), affects A. gambiae s. l. blood meal seeking and feeding behaviors as well as susceptibility to infection. HMBPP acts indirectly by triggering human red blood cells to increase the release of CO2, aldehydes, and monoterpenes, which together enhance vector attraction and stimulate vector feeding. When offered in a blood meal, HMBPP modulates neural, antimalarial, and oogenic gene transcription without affecting mosquito survival or fecundity; in a P. falciparum-infected blood meal, sporogony is increased.

  • 26. Evans, P. A.
    et al.
    Cenko, S. B.
    Kennea, J. A.
    Emery, S. W. K.
    Kuin, N. P. M.
    Korobkin, O.
    Wollaeger, R. T.
    Fryer, C. L.
    Madsen, K. K.
    Harrison, F. A.
    Xu, Y.
    Nakar, E.
    Hotokezaka, K.
    Lien, A.
    Campana, S.
    Oates, S. R.
    Troja, E.
    Breeveld, A. A.
    Marshall, F. E.
    Barthelmy, S. D.
    Beardmore, A. P.
    Burrows, D. N.
    Cusumano, G.
    D'Ai, A.
    D'Avanzo, P.
    D'Elia, V.
    De Pasquale, M.
    Even, W. P.
    Fontes, C. J.
    Forster, K.
    Garcia, J.
    Giommi, P.
    Grefenstette, B.
    Gronwall, C.
    Hartmann, D. H.
    Heida, M.
    Hungerford, A. L.
    Kasliwal, M. M.
    Krimm, H. A.
    Levan, A. J.
    Malesani, D.
    Melandri, A.
    Miyasaka, H.
    Nousek, J. A.
    O'Brien, P. T.
    Osborne, J. P.
    Pagani, C.
    Page, K. L.
    Palmer, D. M.
    Perri, M.
    Pike, S.
    Racusin, J. L.
    Rosswog, Stephan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Siegel, M. H.
    Sakamoto, T.
    Sbarufatti, B.
    Tagliaferri, G.
    Tanvir, N. R.
    Tohuvavohu, A.
    Swift and NuSTAR observations of GW170817: Detection of a blue kilonova2017In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 358, no 6370, p. 1565-1569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the first direct detection of merging black holes in 2015, the era of gravitational wave (GW) astrophysics began. A complete picture of compact object mergers, however, requires the detection of an electromagnetic (EM) counterpart. We report ultraviolet (UV) and x-ray observations by Swift and the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array of the EM counter part of the binary neutron star merger GW170817. The bright, rapidly fading UV emission indicates a high mass (approximate to 0.03 solar masses) wind-driven outflow with moderate electron fraction (Y-e approximate to 0.27). Combined with the x-ray limits, we favor an observer viewing angle of approximate to 30 degrees away from the orbital rotation axis, which avoids both obscuration from the heaviest elements in the orbital plane and a direct view of any ultrarelativistic, highly collimated ejecta (a gamma-ray burst afterglow).

  • 27. Fermi LAT Collaboration,
    et al.
    Abdo, A. A.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Axelsson, M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Baughman, B. M.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Berenji, B.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Brez, A.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Burnett, T. H.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Cecchi, C.
    Çelik, Ö.
    Chaty, S.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Cominsky, L. R.
    Conrad, J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Corbel, S.
    Corbet, R.
    Dermer, C. D.
    de Palma, F.
    Digel, S. W.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Dubois, R.
    Dubus, G.
    Dumora, D.
    Farnier, C.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Focke, W. B.
    Fortin, P.
    Frailis, M.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gehrels, N.
    Germani, S.
    Giavitto, G.
    Giebels, B.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giordano, F.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grondin, M.-H.
    Grove, J. E.
    Guillemot, L.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hanabata, Y.
    Harding, A. K.
    Hayashida, M.
    Hays, E.
    Hill, A. B.
    Hjalmarsdotter, L.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy.
    Horan, D.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Jackson, M. S.
    Jóhannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, T. J.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Kamae, T.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kawai, N.
    Kerr, M.
    Knödlseder, J.
    Kocian, M. L.
    Koerding, E.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Latronico, J.
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Madejski, G. M.
    Makeev, A.
    Marchand, L.
    Marelli, M.
    Max-Moerbeck, W.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McColl, N.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Meurer, C.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Migliari, S.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Omodei, N.
    Ong, R. A.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Paneque, D.
    Parent, D.
    Pelassa, V.
    Pepe, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Pooley, G.
    Porter, T. A.
    Pottschmidt, K.
    Rainò, S.
    Rando, R.
    Ray, P. S.
    Razzano, M.
    Rea, N.
    Readhead, A.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Richards, J. L.
    Rochester, L. S.
    Rodriguez, J.
    Rodriguez, A. Y.
    Romani, R. W.
    Ryde, F.
    Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.
    Sander, A.
    Saz Parkinson, P. M.
    Sgrò, C.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Smith, D. A.
    Smith, P. D.
    Spinelli, P.
    Starck, J.-L.
    Stevenson, M.
    Strickman, M. S.
    Suson, D. J.
    Takahashi, H.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Tomsick, J. A.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Tramacere, A.
    Uchiyama, Y.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vilchez, N.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wang, P.
    Wilms, J.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. W.
    Ylinen, T.
    Ziegler, M.
    Modulated High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from the Microquasar Cygnus X-32009In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 326, no 5959, p. 1512-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microquasars are accreting black holes or neutron stars in binary systems with associated relativistic jets. Despite their frequent outburst activity, they have never been unambiguously detected emitting high-energy gamma rays. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has detected a variable high-energy source coinciding with the position of the x-ray binary and microquasar Cygnus X-3. Its identification with Cygnus X-3 is secured by the detection of its orbital period in gamma rays, as well as the correlation of the LAT flux with radio emission from the relativistic jets of Cygnus X-3. The gamma-ray emission probably originates from within the binary system, opening new areas in which to study the formation of relativistic jets.

  • 28. Ferreira, J.
    et al.
    Aragão, L.E.O.C.
    Barlow, J.
    Gardner, Toby A.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Brazil’s environmental leadership at risk: Mining and dams threaten protected areas2014In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 346, no 6210, p. 706-707Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29. France, Kevin
    et al.
    McCray, Richard
    Heng, Kevin
    Kirshner, Robert P.
    Challis, Peter
    Bouchet, Patrice
    Crotts, Arlin
    Dwek, Eli
    Fransson, Claes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Garnavich, Peter M.
    Larsson, Josefin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lawrence, Stephen S.
    Lundqvist, Peter
    Panagia, Nino
    Pun, Chun S. J.
    Smith, Nathan
    Sollerman, Jesper
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Sonneborn, George
    Stocke, John T.
    Wang, Lifan
    Wheeler, J. Craig
    Observing Supernova 1987A with the Refurbished Hubble Space Telescope2010In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 329, no 5999, p. 1624-1627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), conducted since 1990, now offer an unprecedented glimpse into fast astrophysical shocks in the young remnant of supernova 1987A. Comparing observations taken in 2010 with the use of the refurbished instruments on HST with data taken in 2004, just before the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph failed, we find that the Ly alpha and H alpha lines from shock emission continue to brighten, whereas their maximum velocities continue to decrease. We observe broad, blueshifted Ly alpha, which we attribute to resonant scattering of photons emitted from hot spots on the equatorial ring. We also detect N v lambda lambda 1239, 1243 angstrom line emission, but only to the red of Ly alpha. The profiles of the N v lines differ markedly from that of H alpha, suggesting that the N4+ ions are scattered and accelerated by turbulent electromagnetic fields that isotropize the ions in the collisionless shock.

  • 30. Frantz, Laurent A. F.
    et al.
    Mullin, Victoria E.
    Pionnier-Capitan, Maud
    Lebrasseur, Ophélie
    Ollivier, Morgane
    Perri, Angela
    Linderholm, Anna
    Mattiangeli, Valeria
    Teasdale, Matthew D.
    Dimopoulos, Evangelos A.
    Tresset, Anne
    Duffraisse, Marilyne
    McCormick, Finbar
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Gál, Erika
    Nyerges, Éva A.
    Sablin, Mikhail V.
    Bréhard, Stéphanie
    Mashkour, Marjan
    Balaşescu, Adrian
    Gillet, Benjamin
    Hughes, Sandrine
    Chassaing, Olivier
    Hitte, Christophe
    Vigne, Jean-Denis
    Dobney, Keith
    Hänni, Catherine
    Bradley, Daniel G.
    Larson, Greger
    Genomic and archaeological evidence suggests a dual origin of domestic dogs2016In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 352, no 6290, p. 1228-1231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The geographic and temporal origins of dogs remain controversial. We generated genetic sequences from 59 ancient dogs and a complete (28x) genome of a late Neolithic dog (dated to similar to 4800 calendar years before the present) from Ireland. Our analyses revealed a deep split separating modern East Asian and Western Eurasian dogs. Surprisingly, the date of this divergence (similar to 14,000 to 6400 years ago) occurs commensurate with, or several millennia after, the first appearance of dogs in Europe and East Asia. Additional analyses of ancient and modern mitochondrial DNA revealed a sharp discontinuity in haplotype frequencies in Europe. Combined, these results suggest that dogs may have been domesticated independently in Eastern and Western Eurasia from distinct wolf populations. East Eurasian dogs were then possibly transported to Europe with people, where they partially replaced European Paleolithic dogs.

  • 31. Freire, P. C. C.
    et al.
    Abdo, A. A.
    Ajello, M.
    Allafort, A.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Camilo, F.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Cecchi, C.
    Celik, O.
    Charles, E.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cognard, I.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Cominsky, L. R.
    de Palma, F.
    Dermer, C. D.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Dormody, M.
    Drell, P. S.
    Dubois, R.
    Dumora, D.
    Espinoza, C. M.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Ferrara, E. C.
    Focke, W. B.
    Fortin, P.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gasparrini, D.
    Gehrels, N.
    Germani, S.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giordano, F.
    Giroletti, M.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grondin, M. -H
    Grove, J. E.
    Guillemot, L.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hadasch, D.
    Harding, A. K.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, T. J.
    Johnston, S.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Keith, M.
    Kerr, M.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kramer, M.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Latronico, L.
    Lee, S. -H
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Lyne, A. G.
    Manchester, R. N.
    Marelli, M.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Nakamori, T.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Okumura, A.
    Omodei, N.
    Orlando, E.
    Ozaki, M.
    Paneque, D.
    Parent, D.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Pierbattista, M.
    Piron, F.
    Porter, T. A.
    Raino, S.
    Ransom, S. M.
    Ray, P. S.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reposeur, T.
    Ritz, S.
    Romani, R. W.
    Roth, M.
    Sadrozinski, H. F. -W
    Parkinson, P. M. Saz
    Sgro, C.
    Shannon, R.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Smith, D. A.
    Smith, P. D.
    Spinelli, P.
    Stappers, B. W.
    Suson, D. J.
    Takahashi, H.
    Tanaka, T.
    Tauris, T. M.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Theureau, G.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Thorsett, S. E.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Troja, E.
    Vandenbroucke, J.
    Van Etten, A.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Venter, C.
    Vianello, G.
    Vilchez, N.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wang, P.
    Wood, K. S.
    Yang, Zhaoyu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ziegler, M.
    Zimmer, Stephan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Fermi Detection of a Luminous gamma-Ray Pulsar in a Globular Cluster2011In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 334, no 6059, p. 1107-1110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the Fermi Large Area Telescope's detection of gamma-ray (>100 mega-electron volts) pulsations from pulsar J1823-3021A in the globular cluster NGC 6624 with high significance (similar to 7 sigma). Its gamma-ray luminosity, L(gamma) = (8.4 +/- 1.6) x 10(34) ergs per second, is the highest observed for any millisecond pulsar (MSP) to date, and it accounts for most of the cluster emission. The nondetection of the cluster in the off-pulse phase implies that it contains <32 gamma-ray MSPs, not similar to 100 as previously estimated. The gamma-ray luminosity indicates that the unusually large rate of change of its period is caused by its intrinsic spin-down. This implies that J1823-3021A has the largest magnetic field and is the youngest MSP ever detected and that such anomalous objects might be forming at rates comparable to those of the more normal MSPs.

  • 32. Frishkoff, Luke O.
    et al.
    Karp, Daniel S.
    M'Gonigle, Leithen K.
    Mendenhall, Chase D.
    Zook, Jim
    Kremen, Claire
    Hadly, Elizabeth A.
    Daily, Gretchen C.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stanford University, USA; Royal Swedish Academy of Science, Sweden.
    Loss of avian phylogenetic diversity in neotropical agricultural systems2014In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 345, no 6202, p. 1343-1346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Habitat conversion is the primary driver of biodiversity loss, yet little is known about how it is restructuring the tree of life by favoring some lineages over others. We combined a complete avian phylogeny with 12 years of Costa Rican bird surveys (118,127 detections across 487 species) sampled in three land uses: forest reserves, diversified agricultural systems, and intensive monocultures. Diversified agricultural systems supported 600 million more years of evolutionary history than intensive monocultures but 300 million fewer years than forests. Compared with species with many extant relatives, evolutionarily distinct species were extirpated at higher rates in both diversified and intensive agricultural systems. Forests are therefore essential for maintaining diversity across the tree of life, but diversified agricultural systems may help buffer against extreme loss of phylogenetic diversity.

  • 33. Garibaldi, Lucas A.
    et al.
    Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf
    Winfree, Rachael
    Aizen, Marcelo A.
    Bommarco, Riccardo
    Cunningham, Saul A.
    Kremen, Claire
    Carvalheiro, Luisa G.
    Harder, Lawrence D.
    Afik, Ohad
    Bartomeus, Ignasi
    Benjamin, Faye
    Boreux, Virginie
    Cariveau, Daniel
    Chacoff, Natacha P.
    Dudenhoeffer, Jan H.
    Freitas, Breno M.
    Ghazoul, Jaboury
    Greenleaf, Sarah
    Hipolito, Juliana
    Holzschuh, Andrea
    Howlett, Brad
    Isaacs, Rufus
    Javorek, Steven K.
    Kennedy, Christina M.
    Krewenka, Kristin M.
    Krishnan, Smitha
    Mandelik, Yael
    Mayfield, Margaret M.
    Motzke, Iris
    Munyuli, Theodore
    Nault, Brian A.
    Otieno, Mark
    Petersen, Jessica
    Pisanty, Gideon
    Potts, Simon G.
    Rader, Romina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Ricketts, Taylor H.
    Rundlof, Maj
    Seymour, Colleen L.
    Schueepp, Christof
    Szentgyoergyi, Hajnalka
    Taki, Hisatomo
    Tscharntke, Teja
    Vergara, Carlos H.
    Viana, Blandina F.
    Wanger, Thomas C.
    Westphal, Catrin
    Williams, Neal
    Klein, Alexandra M.
    Wild Pollinators Enhance Fruit Set of Crops Regardless of Honey Bee Abundance2013In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 339, no 6127, p. 1608-1611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The diversity and abundance of wild insect pollinators have declined in many agricultural landscapes. Whether such declines reduce crop yields, or are mitigated by managed pollinators such as honey bees, is unclear. We found universally positive associations of fruit set with flower visitation by wild insects in 41 crop systems worldwide. In contrast, fruit set increased significantly with flower visitation by honey bees in only 14% of the systems surveyed. Overall, wild insects pollinated crops more effectively; an increase in wild insect visitation enhanced fruit set by twice as much as an equivalent increase in honey bee visitation. Visitation by wild insects and honey bees promoted fruit set independently, so pollination by managed honey bees supplemented, rather than substituted for, pollination by wild insects. Our results suggest that new practices for integrated management of both honey bees and diverse wild insect assemblages will enhance global crop yields.

  • 34.
    Goobar, Ariel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Amanullah, Rahman
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Kulkarni, S. R.
    Nugent, P. E.
    Johansson, Joel
    Steidel, C.
    Law, D.
    Mörtsell, Edvard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Quimby, Robert
    Blagorodnova, N.
    Brandeker, A.
    Cao, Y.
    Cooray, A.
    Ferretti, Raphael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Fremling, Christoffer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hangard, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Kasliwai, M.
    Kupfer, T.
    Lunnan, R.
    Masci, F.
    Miller, A. A.
    Nayyeri, H.
    Neill, J. D.
    Ofek, E. O.
    Papadogiannakis, Seméli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Petrushevska, Tanja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ravi, V.
    Sollerman, Jesper
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Sullivan, M.
    Taddia, Francesco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Walters, R.
    Wilson, D.
    Yan, L.
    Yaron, O.
    iPTF16geu: A multiply imaged, gravitationally lensed type Ia supernova2017In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 356, no 6335, p. 291-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the discovery of a multiply imaged, gravitationally lensed type Ia supernova, iPTF16geu (SN 2016geu), at redshift z = 0.409. This phenomenon was identified because the light from the stellar explosion was magnified more than 50 times by the curvature of space around matter in an intervening galaxy. We used high-spatial-resolution observations to resolve four images of the lensed supernova, approximately 0.3 arc seconds from the center of the foreground galaxy. The observations probe a physical scale of ~1 kiloparsec, smaller than is typical in other studies of extragalactic gravitational lensing. The large magnification and symmetric image configuration imply close alignment between the lines of sight to the supernova and to the lens. The relative magnifications of the four images provide evidence for substructures in the lensing galaxy.

  • 35. Griesmann, Maximilian
    et al.
    Chang, Yue
    Liu, Xin
    Song, Yue
    Haberer, Georg
    Crook, Matthew B.
    Billault-Penneteau, Benjamin
    Lauressergues, Dominique
    Keller, Jean
    Imanishi, Leandro
    Roswanjaya, Yuda Purwana
    Kohlen, Wouter
    Pujic, Petar
    Battenberg, Kai
    Alloisio, Nicole
    Liang, Yuhu
    Hilhorst, Henk
    Salgado, Marco G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Hocher, Valerie
    Gherbi, Hassen
    Svistoonoff, Sergio
    Doyle, Jeff J.
    He, Shixu
    Xu, Yan
    Xu, Shanyun
    Qu, Jing
    Gao, Qiang
    Fang, Xiaodong
    Fu, Yuan
    Normand, Philippe
    Berry, Alison M.
    Wall, Luis G.
    Ane, Jean-Michel
    Pawlowski, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Xu, Xun
    Yang, Huanming
    Spannagl, Manuel
    Mayer, Klaus F. X.
    Wong, Gane Ka-Shu
    Parniske, Martin
    Delaux, Pierre-Marc
    Cheng, Shifeng
    Phylogenomics reveals multiple losses of nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbiosis2018In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 361, no 6398, article id 1743Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Gustafsson, Örjan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Kruså, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Zencak, Zdenek
    Sheesley, Rebecca J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Granat, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology .
    Engström, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology .
    Praveen, P.S.
    Rao, P.S.P.
    Leck, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology .
    Rodhe, Henning
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology .
    Brown clouds over South Asia: Biomass or fossil fuel combustion?2009In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 323, no 23 January, p. 495-498Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Hambäck, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    A green or a prickly world?2010In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 327, p. 1583-1584Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is the world a green place where plant biomass abounds for herbivores to devour, or a prickly place where herbivores struggle to locate the few edible plant pieces? The answer to this question has crucial consequences for broad ecological and evolutionary questions. On page 1642 of this issue, Mooney et al. (1) show how evolutionary trade-offs among plant traits affect responses to herbivores and higher trophic levels.

  • 38.
    Hubert, Casey
    et al.
    Max-Planck Institute for marine Microbiology.
    Loy, Alexander
    Department of Microbial Ecology, University of Vienna.
    Nickel, Maren
    Max-Planck Institute for marine Microbiology.
    Arnosti, Carol
    Deparment of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill.
    Baranyi, Christian
    Department of Microbial Ecology, University of Vienna.
    Brüchert, Volker
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geology and Geochemistry.
    Ferdelman, Timothy
    Max-Planck Institute for marine Microbiology.
    Finster, Kai
    Department of Biological Sciences, Arhus University.
    Christensen, Flemming Monsted,
    Department of Biological Sciences, Arhus University.
    de Rezende, Julia Rosa
    Center for Geomicrobiology, Arhus University.
    Vandieken, Verona
    Max-Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology.
    Jørgensen, Bo Barker
    Center for Geomicrobiology, Arhus University.
    A constant flux of diverse thermophilic bacteria into the cold Arctic seabed2009In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 325, no 18, p. 1541-1544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microorganisms have been repeatedly discovered in environments that do not support their metabolic activity. Identifying and quantifying these misplaced organisms can reveal dispersal mechanisms that shape natural microbial diversity. Using endospore germination experiments, we estimated a stable supply of thermophilic bacteria into permanently cold Arctic marine sediment at a rate exceeding 108 spores per square meter per year. These metabolically and phylogenetically diverse Firmicutes show no detectable activity at cold in situ temperatures but rapidly mineralize organic matter by hydrolysis, fermentation, and sulfate reduction upon induction at 50°C. The closest relatives to these bacteria come from warm subsurface petroleum reservoir and ocean crust ecosystems, suggesting that seabed fluid flow from these environments is delivering thermophiles to the cold ocean. These transport pathways may broadly influence microbial community composition in the marine environment.

  • 39.
    Huldtgren, Therese
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Cunningham, John
    Yin, Chongyu
    Stampanoni, Marco
    Marone, Federica
    Donoghue, Philip
    Bengtson, Stefan
    Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    Fossilized nuclei and germination structures identify Ediacaran "animal embryos" as encysting protists2011In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 334, no 6063, p. 1696-1699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Globular fossils showing palintomic cell cleavage in the Ediacaran Doushantuo Formation, China, are widely regarded as embryos of early metazoans, although metazoan synapomorphies, tissue differentiation, and associated juveniles or adults are lacking. We demonstrate using synchrotron-based x-ray tomographic microscopy that the fossils have features incompatible with multicellular metazoan embryos. The developmental pattern is comparable with nonmetazoan holozoans, including germination stages that preclude postcleavage embryology characteristic of metazoans. We conclude that these fossils are neither animals nor embryos. They belong outside crown-group Metazoa, within total-group Holozoa (the sister clade to Fungi that includes Metazoa, Choanoflagellata, and Mesomycetozoea) or perhaps on even more distant branches in the eukaryote tree. They represent an evolutionary grade in which palintomic cleavage served the function of producing propagules for dispersion.

  • 40.
    Högbom, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Nitrogenase Mechanism. A dynamic tool for nitrogen reduction2014In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 345, no 6204, p. 1568-1568Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though nitrogen makes up almost 80% of the atmosphere, it is a limiting nutrient for biomass production. The low reactivity of nitrogen gas (N2) is a result of its very strong, unpolarized triple bond. Nitrogenase is the only enzyme known that can break this bond to produce compounds such as ammonia (NH3) for use in biosynthetic pathways. The atomic structure of this amazing system has been known for more than two decades (1, 2), but the chemical mechanism of this central reaction remains unknown. In a biochemical and structural tour de force, on page 1620 of this issue, Spatzal et al. (3) report the crystal structure of carbon monoxide (CO) bound to the catalytic metal cluster of the enzyme. This work revealed an unexpected structural rearrangement of the cofactor.

  • 41. Hüpers, Andre
    et al.
    Torres, Marta E.
    Owari, Satoko
    McNeill, Lisa C.
    Dugan, Brandon
    Henstock, Timothy J.
    Milliken, Kitty L.
    Petronotis, Katerina E.
    Backman, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Bourlange, Sylvain
    Chemale, Farid
    Chen, Wenhuang
    Colson, Tobias A.
    Frederik, Marina C. G.
    Guèrin, Gilles
    Hamahashi, Mari
    House, Brian M.
    Jeppson, Tamara N.
    Kachovich, Sarah
    Kenigsberg, Abby R.
    Kuranaga, Mebae
    Kutterolf, Steffen
    Mitchison, Freya L.
    Mukoyoshi, Hideki
    Nair, Nisha
    Pickering, Kevin T.
    Pouderoux, Hugo F. A.
    Shan, Yehua
    Song, Insun
    Vannucchi, Paola
    Vrolijk, Peter J.
    Yang, Tao
    Zhao, Xixi
    Release of mineral-bound water prior to subduction tied to shallow seismogenic slip off Sumatra2017In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 356, no 6340, p. 841-844Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plate-boundary fault rupture during the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman subduction earthquake extended closer to the trench than expected, increasing earthquake and tsunami size. International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 362 sampled incoming sediments offshore northern Sumatra, revealing recent release of fresh water within the deep sediments. Thermal modeling links this freshening to amorphous silica dehydration driven by rapid burial-induced temperature increases in the past 9 million years. Complete dehydration of silicates is expected before plate subduction, contrasting with prevailing models for subduction seismogenesis calling for fluid production during subduction. Shallow slip offshore Sumatra appears driven by diagenetic strengthening of deeply buried fault-forming sediments, contrasting with weakening proposed for the shallow Tohoku-Oki 2011 rupture, but our results are applicable to other thickly sedimented subduction zones including those with limited earthquake records.

  • 42. Isinger, M.
    et al.
    Squibb, R. J.
    Busto, D.
    Zhong, S.
    Harth, A.
    Kroon, D.
    Nandi, S.
    Arnold, C. L.
    Miranda, M.
    Dahlström, J. Marcus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Lund University, Sweden.
    Lindroth, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Feifel, R.
    Gisselbrecht, M.
    L'Huillier, A.
    Photoionization in the time and frequency domain2017In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 358, no 6365, p. 893-896Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultrafast processes in matter, such as the electron emission after light absorption, can now be studied using ultrashort light pulses of attosecond duration (10-18 seconds) in the extreme ultraviolet spectral range. The lack of spectral resolution due to the use of short light pulses has raised issues in the interpretation of the experimental results and the comparison with theoretical calculations. We determine photoionization time delays in neon atoms over a 40-electron volt energy range with an interferometric technique combining high temporal and spectral resolution. We spectrally disentangle direct ionization from ionization with shake-up, in which a second electron is left in an excited state, and obtain excellent agreement with theoretical calculations, thereby solving a puzzle raised by 7-year-old measurements.

  • 43.
    Jaramillo, Fernando
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Destouni, Georgia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Comment on “Planetary boundaries: Guiding human development on a changing planet"2015In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 348, no 6240, p. 1217-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Steffen et al. (Research Articles, 13 February 2015, p. 736) recently assessed current global freshwater use, finding it to be well below a corresponding planetary boundary. However, they ignored recent scientific advances implying that the global consumptive use of freshwater may have already crossed the associated planetary boundary.

  • 44.
    Jaramillo, Fernando
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Destouni, Georgia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Local flow regulation and irrigation raise global human water consumption and footprint2015In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 350, no 6265, p. 1248-1251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flow regulation and irrigation alter local freshwater conditions, but their global effects are highly uncertain. We investigated these global effects from 1901 to 2008, using hydroclimatic observations in 100 large hydrological basins. Globally, we find consistent and dominant effects of increasing relative evapotranspiration from both activities, and decreasing temporal runoff variability from flow regulation. The evapotranspiration effect increases the long-term average human consumption of fresh water by 3563 +/- 979 km(3)/year from 1901-1954 to 1955-2008. This increase raises a recent estimate of the current global water footprint of humanity by around 18%, to 10,688 +/- 979 km(3)/year. The results highlight the global impact of local water-use activities and call for their relevant account in Earth system modeling.

  • 45. Jimenez, J. L.
    et al.
    Canagaratna, M. R.
    Donahue, N. M.
    Prevot, A. S. H.
    Zhang, Q.
    Kroll, J. H.
    DeCarlo, P. F.
    Allan, J. D.
    Coe, H.
    Ng, N. L.
    Aiken, A. C.
    Docherty, K. S.
    Ulbrich, I. M.
    Grieshop, A. P.
    Robinson, A. L.
    Duplissy, J.
    Smith, J. D.
    Wilson, K. R.
    Lanz, V. A.
    Hueglin, C.
    Sun, Y. L.
    Tian, J.
    Laaksonen, A.
    Raatikainen, T.
    Rautiainen, J.
    Vaattovaara, P.
    Ehn, M.
    Kulmala, Markku
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Tomlinson, J. M.
    Collins, D. R.
    Cubison, M. J.
    Dunlea, E. J.
    Huffman, J. A.
    Onasch, T. B.
    Alfarra, M. R.
    Williams, P. I.
    Bower, K.
    Kondo, Y.
    Schneider, J.
    Drewnick, F.
    Borrmann, S.
    Weimer, S.
    Demerjian, K.
    Salcedo, D.
    Cottrell, L.
    Griffin, R.
    Takami, A.
    Miyoshi, T.
    Hatakeyama, S.
    Shimono, A.
    Sun, J. Y.
    Zhang, Y. M.
    Dzepina, K.
    Kimmel, J. R.
    Sueper, D.
    Jayne, J. T.
    Herndon, S. C.
    Trimborn, A. M.
    Williams, L. R.
    Wood, E. C.
    Middlebrook, A. M.
    Kolb, C. E.
    Baltensperger, U.
    Worsnop, D. R.
    Evolution of Organic Aerosols in the Atmosphere2009In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 326, no 5959, p. 1525-1529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic aerosol (OA) particles affect climate forcing and human health, but their sources and evolution remain poorly characterized. We present a unifying model framework describing the atmospheric evolution of OA that is constrained by high-time-resolution measurements of its composition, volatility, and oxidation state. OA and OA precursor gases evolve by becoming increasingly oxidized, less volatile, and more hygroscopic, leading to the formation of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA), with concentrations comparable to those of sulfate aerosol throughout the Northern Hemisphere. Our model framework captures the dynamic aging behavior observed in both the atmosphere and laboratory: It can serve as a basis for improving parameterizations in regional and global models.

  • 46. Kasliwal, M. M.
    et al.
    Nakar, E.
    Singer, L. P.
    Kaplan, D. L.
    Cook, D. O.
    Van Sistine, A.
    Lau, R. M.
    Fremling, C.
    Gottlieb, O.
    Jencson, J. E.
    Adams, S. M.
    Feindt, Ulrich
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hotokezaka, K.
    Ghosh, S.
    Perley, D. A.
    Yu, P-C.
    Piran, T.
    Allison, J. R.
    Anupama, G. C.
    Balasubramanian, A.
    Bannister, K. W.
    Bally, J.
    Barnes, J.
    Barway, S.
    Bellm, E.
    Bhalerao, V.
    Bhattacharya, D.
    Blagorodnova, N.
    Bloom, J. S.
    Brady, P. R.
    Cannella, C.
    Chatterjee, D.
    Cenko, S. B.
    Cobb, B. E.
    Copperwheat, C.
    Corsi, A.
    De, K.
    Dobie, D.
    Emery, S. W. K.
    Evans, P. A.
    Fox, O. D.
    Frail, D. A.
    Frohmaier, C.
    Goobar, Ariel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hallinan, G.
    Harrison, F.
    Helou, G.
    Hinderer, T.
    Ho, A. Y. Q.
    Horesh, A.
    Ip, W-H.
    Itoh, R.
    Kasen, D.
    Kim, H.
    Kuin, N. P. M.
    Kupfer, T.
    Lynch, C.
    Madsen, K.
    Mazzali, P. A.
    Miller, A. A.
    Mooley, K.
    Murphy, T.
    Ngeow, C-C.
    Nichols, D.
    Nissanke, S.
    Nugent, P.
    Ofek, E. O.
    Qi, H.
    Quimby, R. M.
    Rosswog, Stephan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Rusu, F.
    Sadler, E. M.
    Schmidt, P.
    Sollerman, Jesper
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Steele, I.
    Williamson, A. R.
    Xu, Y.
    Yan, L.
    Yatsu, Y.
    Zhang, C.
    Zhao, W.
    Illuminating gravitational waves: A concordant picture of photons from a neutron star merger2017In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 358, no 6370, p. 1559-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Merging neutron stars offer an excellent laboratory for simultaneously studying strong-field gravity and matter in extreme environments. We establish the physical association of an electromagnetic counterpart (EM170817) with gravitational waves (GW170817) detected from merging neutron stars. By synthesizing a panchromatic data set, we demonstrate that merging neutron stars are a long-sought production site forging heavy elements by r-process nucleosynthesis. The weak gamma rays seen in EM170817 are dissimilar to classical short gamma-ray bursts with ultrarelativistic jets. Instead, we suggest that breakout of a wide-angle, mildly relativistic cocoon engulfing the jet explains the low-luminosity gamma rays, the high-luminosity ultraviolet-optical-infrared, and the delayed radio and x-ray emission. We posit that all neutron star mergers may lead to a wide-angle cocoon breakout, sometimes accompanied by a successful jet and sometimes by a choked jet.

  • 47. Kern, Jan
    et al.
    Alonso-Mori, Roberto
    Tran, Rosalie
    Hattne, Johan
    Gildea, Richard J.
    Echols, Nathaniel
    Gloeckner, Carina
    Hellmich, Julia
    Laksmono, Hartawan
    Sierra, Raymond G.
    Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt
    Koroidov, Sergey
    Lampe, Alyssa
    Han, Guangye
    Gul, Sheraz
    DiFiore, Doerte
    Milathianaki, Despina
    Fry, Alan R.
    Miahnahri, Alan
    Schafer, Donald W.
    Messerschmidt, Marc
    Seibert, M. Marvin
    Koglin, Jason E.
    Sokaras, Dimosthenis
    Weng, Tsu-Chien
    Sellberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Latimer, Matthew J.
    Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.
    Zwart, Petrus H.
    White, William E.
    Glatzel, Pieter
    Adams, Paul D.
    Bogan, Michael J.
    Williams, Garth J.
    Boutet, Sebastien
    Messinger, Johannes
    Zouni, Athina
    Sauter, Nicholas K.
    Yachandra, Vittal K.
    Bergmann, Uwe
    Yano, Junko
    Simultaneous Femtosecond X-ray Spectroscopy and Diffraction of Photosystem II at Room Temperature2013In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 340, no 6131, p. 491-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses produced at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) were used for simultaneous x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of microcrystals of photosystem II (PS II) at room temperature. This method probes the overall protein structure and the electronic structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of PS II. XRD data are presented from both the dark state (S-1) and the first illuminated state (S-2) of PS II. Our simultaneous XRD-XES study shows that the PS II crystals are intact during our measurements at the LCLS, not only with respect to the structure of PS II, but also with regard to the electronic structure of the highly radiation-sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster, opening new directions for future dynamics studies.

  • 48.
    Kim, Kyung Hwan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Späh, Alexander
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Pathak, Harshad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Perakis, Fivos
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Mariedahl, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Amann-Winkel, Katrin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sellberg, Jonas A.
    Lee, Jae Hyuk
    Kim, Sangsoo
    Park, Jaehyun
    Nam, Ki Hyun
    Katayama, Tetsuo
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Maxima in the thermodynamic response and correlation functions of deeply supercooled water2017In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 358, no 6370, p. 1589-1593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Femtosecond x-ray laser pulses were used to probe micrometer-sized water droplets that were cooled down to 227 kelvin in vacuum. Isothermal compressibility and correlation length were extracted from x-ray scattering at the low-momentum transfer region. The temperature dependence of these thermodynamic response and correlation functions shows maxima at 229 kelvin for water and 233 kelvin for heavy water. In addition, we observed that the liquids undergo the fastest growth of tetrahedral structures at similar temperatures. These observations point to the existence of a Widom line, defined as the locus of maximum correlation length emanating from a critical point at positive pressures in the deeply supercooled regime. The difference in the maximum value of the isothermal compressibility between the two isotopes shows the importance of nuclear quantum effects.

  • 49. Kulmala, Markku
    et al.
    Kontkanen, Jenni
    Junninen, Heikki
    Lehtipalo, Katrianne
    Manninen, Hanna E.
    Nieminen, Tuomo
    Petäjä, Tuukka
    Sipilä, Mikko
    Schobesberger, Siegfried
    Rantala, Pekka
    Franchin, Alessandro
    Jokinen, Tuija
    Järvinen, Emma
    Äijälä, Mikko
    Kangasluoma, Juha
    Hakala, Jani
    Aalto, Pasi P.
    Paasonen, Pauli
    Mikkilä, Jyri
    Vanhanen, Joonas
    Aalto, Juho
    Hakola, Hannele
    Makkonen, Ulla
    Ruuskanen, Taina
    Mauldin, Roy L., III
    Duplissy, Jonathan
    Vehkamäki, Hanna
    Bäck, Jaana
    Kortelainen, Aki
    Riipinen, Ilona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Kurtén, Theo
    Johnston, Murray V.
    Smith, James N.
    Ehn, Mikael
    Mentel, Thomas F.
    Lehtinen, Kari E. J.
    Laaksonen, Ari
    Kerminen, Veli-Matti
    Worsnop, Douglas R.
    Direct Observations of Atmospheric Aerosol Nucleation2013In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 339, no 6122, p. 943-946Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atmospheric nucleation is the dominant source of aerosol particles in the global atmosphere and an important player in aerosol climatic effects. The key steps of this process occur in the sub-2-nanometer (nm) size range, in which direct size-segregated observations have not been possible until very recently. Here, we present detailed observations of atmospheric nanoparticles and clusters down to 1-nm mobility diameter. We identified three separate size regimes below 2-nm diameter that build up a physically, chemically, and dynamically consistent framework on atmospheric nucleation-more specifically, aerosol formation via neutral pathways. Our findings emphasize the important role of organic compounds in atmospheric aerosol formation, subsequent aerosol growth, radiative forcing and associated feedbacks between biogenic emissions, clouds, and climate.

  • 50. Laliberte, F.
    et al.
    Zika, J.
    Mudryk, L.
    Kushner, P. J.
    Kjellsson, J.
    Doos, Kristofer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology .
    Constrained work output of the moist atmospheric heat engine in a warming climate2015In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 347, no 6221, p. 540-543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Incoming and outgoing solar radiation couple with heat exchange at Earth's surface to drive weather patterns that redistribute heat and moisture around the globe, creating an atmospheric heat engine. Here, we investigate the engine's work output using thermodynamic diagrams computed from reanalyzed observations and from a climate model simulation with anthropogenic forcing. We show that the work output is always less than that of an equivalent Carnot cycle and that it is constrained by the power necessary to maintain the hydrological cycle. In the climate simulation, the hydrological cycle increases more rapidly than the equivalent Carnot cycle. We conclude that the intensification of the hydrological cycle in warmer climates might limit the heat engine's ability to generate work.

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