Change search
Refine search result
1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alm, Susanne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Brolin Låftman, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    The Gendered Mirror on the Wall: Satisfaction with Physical Appearance and Its Relationship to Global Self-esteem and Psychosomatic Complaints Among Adolescent Boys and Girls2018In: Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, ISSN 1103-3088, E-ISSN 1741-3222, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 525-541Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study investigated gender differences in satisfaction with physical appearance as a domain-specific aspect of self-esteem, and its association with global self-esteem and psychosomatic complaints. The data used was from the Stockholm School Survey, conducted among ninth grade students (15–16 years), with pooled information from six cross-sectional surveys in 2004–2014 (n = 32,117). Girls reported lower satisfaction with their appearance than boys. Satisfaction with appearance was more strongly associated with global self-esteem among girls, while the association with psychosomatic complaints was similar for both genders. There was a tendency towards a decline in satisfaction with appearance at the end of the study period for both genders, albeit more strong for girls. We conclude that satisfaction with appearance may contribute to our understanding of poor mental well-being among adolescent girls.

  • 2.
    Andersson Vogel, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    An Endeavour for Autonomy: How Girls Understand Their Lived Experiences of Being Referred to Secure Care2018In: Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, ISSN 1103-3088, E-ISSN 1741-3222, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 70-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In discussion of troubled adolescent girls, their mental health often is in focus and a discourse constructing girls as vulnerable victims therefore dominates Swedish social services and secure care. This article is an investigation of how the girls themselves are navigating the discursive terrain where understandings of troubled adolescent girls in secure care are regulated. The results show that even though the girls' stories show considerable similarities with what is previously known about troubled adolescent girls, their understandings of their lived experiences differ. The girls resist the dominating discourses that view them as victims by emphasizing their autonomy and own responsibility. However, in trying to distance themselves from devaluing interpretations, they take an attitude that ultimately obstructs their possibilities of getting help, since it inevitably puts them in opposition to the care system.

  • 3.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Gender manoeuvring in Swedish skateboarding: negotiations of femininities and the hierarchical gender structure2013In: Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, ISSN 1103-3088, E-ISSN 1741-3222, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 29-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Nordic countries score high gender equality ratings and we have a long tradition of working with feminist agendas promising liberal futures to both young women and men. Still, today’s young women struggle to make room for female participation in male-dominated space. Based on ethnographic research, this article explores gender manoeuvring, i.e. manipulations of the relationship between masculinity and femininity in the patterned beliefs and activities of Swedish skateboarding. The three most apparent femininities in the empirical material, ‘the tomboy’, ‘the bitch’, and ‘the lesbian’, are discussed and how they sometimes give rise to gender manoeuvring and sometimes not. It is argued that the formation of a national network harnessing feminist strategies has been successful in making space for female skateboarding in local skateparks and the mainstream media. The negotiations these actions result in have the potential to transform the hierarchical gender order between and among masculinities and femininities. However, simultaneous tendencies to preserve the unequal gender structure through valuing both hegemonic masculinity and femininity become visible.

  • 4.
    Edenroth-Cato, Fanny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Sjöblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Biosociality in online interactions: Youths’ positioning of the highly sensitive person category2022In: Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, ISSN 1103-3088, E-ISSN 1741-3222, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 80-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how young people in a Swedish online forum and in blogs engage in discussions of one popularized psychological personality trait, the highly sensitive person (HSP), and how they draw on different positionings in discursive struggles around this category. The material is analysed with concepts from discursivepsychology and post-structuralist theory in order to investigate youths’ interactions.The first is a nuanced positioning, from which youths disclose the weaknesses and strengths of being highly sensitive. Some youths become deeply invested in this kind of positioning, hence forming a HSP subjectivity. This can be opposed using contrasting positionings, which objects to norms of biosociality connected to the HSP. Lastly, there are rather distanced and investigative approaches to the HSP category. We conclude that while young people are negotiating the HSP category, they are establishing an epistemological community.

  • 5. Eklund, Lina
    et al.
    Roman, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Digital Gaming and Young People's Friendships: A Mixed Methods Study of Time Use and Gaming in School2019In: Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, ISSN 1103-3088, E-ISSN 1741-3222, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 32-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this mixed methods study, we investigate the impact of digital gaming on school social life among young people (17-19 year old) by combining over-time data investigating friendships as they form, with subjective experiences of friendships. We draw on one full cohort of Swedish pupils surveyed on three occasions during their first year in upper-secondary school (n = 115) and one interview sample of 10 game users. Results indicate that how much time young people spend on gaming is not a significant factor for friendship formation in the studied sample. Moreover, high-use did not make game users socially isolated or less popular in school. We discuss how young people adhere to ideals of responsible leisure in order to become adults; practising time-management strategies to make place for time-consuming leisure while not letting it impact personal relationships.

  • 6. Henriksen, Ann-Karina
    et al.
    A. Vogel, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Bengtsson, Tea T.
    Honkatukia, Päivi
    Introduction to Special Issue: Exploring Confinement from the Perspectives of Young People2021In: Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, ISSN 1103-3088, E-ISSN 1741-3222, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 5-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Janson, Malena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies, The Centre for the Studies of Children's Culture.
    Book review: D. Buckingham, Youth on Screen. Representing Young People in Film and Television2022In: Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, ISSN 1103-3088, E-ISSN 1741-3222, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 419-420Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    David Buckingham's Youth on Screen. Representing Young People in Film and Television tries, and to a great extent succeeds to, really get to the heart of the problem of representing young people on screen. This means that it puts into question the very concepts of the youth and representation. The youth, Buckingham soon establishes, is constructed and defined by adults and reinforced by cultural media like films and television, which implies that youth film as a genre not only is created for a young audience, it also actually creates the young audience as a specific age category with certain attributes, prerequisites and needs. 

    To sum up, Youth on Screen is a rich, fertile and important read for anyone interested in children and youth, film and television, culture and society—as well as the relations and motions in between. As the author himself notes, it is a comprehensive, but far from all-encompassing, study, and there are numerous more themes, nations and film and television titles worthy of attention. 

  • 8. Rolando, Sara
    et al.
    Törronen, Jukka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Beccaria, Franca
    Boundaries between Adult and Youth Drinking as Expressed by Young People in Italy and Finland2014In: Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, ISSN 1103-3088, E-ISSN 1741-3222, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 227-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study applies the concept of boundary work, as developed by Lamont and Molnar to analyze how young people perceive adult drinking. It is based on eight focus groups involving young people aged 17 to 24 years conducted in Torino (IT) and Helsinki (FI). The study contributes to understand why different orientations towards heavy drinking persist in the two geographical regions. In Italy young people draw explicit boundaries between theirs' and adults' drinking and between proper and deviant drinking, so that their boundary work results in producing social norms that are shared with adults, except for drunkenness, which is seen as normal for young people but not for adults. In Finland young people distance themselves from adults' drinking situations, and describe them in terms of light versus heavy drinking, yet without making distinctions between proper and improper drinking in each situation, thereby articulating an absence of explicit norms against drunkenness.

  • 9.
    Sylwander, Kim R.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    'Fuck Them Walla': Girls' Resistance Within Racialized Online Assemblages2022In: Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, ISSN 1103-3088, E-ISSN 1741-3222, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 5-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inspired by Deleuze and Guattari, this article details how racial minority girls, and those around them, affectively respond to and resist racialization and different forms of racist aggression online. The material draws on a larger netnographic study of young teens on a public social media platform in Sweden and demonstrates how these girls, as well as their racialized peers, are 'othered' through direct, indirect and repeated aggression. I explore how instances of resistance work in various ways to reject, re-appropriate and renegotiate racist assemblages where differing racialized figures are affectively produced and enforced in direct and indirect ways in online interaction. Through this, the study contributes to knowledge on girls' resistance to racialized aggression online, as well as how racism works affectively in youths' everyday online interaction.

  • 10.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Bookreview: Abby Peterson, Contemporary Political Protest, 20012004In: Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, ISSN 1103-3088, E-ISSN 1741-3222, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 175-177Article, book review (Other academic)
1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf