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  • 1.
    Demir, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Fjellström, Daniella
    Translation of Relational Practices in an MNC Subsidiary: Symmetrical, Asymmetrical, and Substitutive Strategies2012In: Asian Business & Management, ISSN 1472-4782, E-ISSN 1476-9328, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 369-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extant research on knowledge transfer within multinational corporations has increasingly focused on knowledge flow, but this research has ignored the process of knowledge translation. Building on translation theory, this paper seeks to explain how the translation of relational practices by local Chinese managers occurs in a Swedish multinational corporation subsidiary in China. The findings show that middle managers in the subsidiary adopt three different translation strategies: symmetrical, asymmetrical, and substitutive. These strategies and their key drivers are discussed, and implications for further research are discussed.

  • 2. Dolles, Harald
    et al.
    Söderman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Mega-Sporting Events in Asia - Impacts on Society, Business and Management: An Introduction2008In: Asian Business & Management, ISSN 1472-4782, E-ISSN 1476-9328, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 147-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mega-sporting events today are central stages that not only feature professional athletes representing their country in competing for excellence, but also provide host nations with a universally legitimate way to present and promote their national identities and cultures on a global scale. This introduction to the special issue of Asian Business & Management on `Mega-sporting events in Asia' suggests insights into the emerging field of research related to mega-events and sport and summarizes the history of mega-sporting events in Asia, linking the topic to the growing importance of sports and the interest shown by national governments and cities in staging sporting events in Asia. It also offers a general framework for understanding a range of conceptual and methodological issues related to defining and measuring the impact of mega-sporting events, indicating potential directions for further research.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3. Jansson, Hans
    et al.
    Söderman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    How large Chinese companies establish international competitiveness in other BRICS: The case of Brazil2013In: Asian Business & Management, ISSN 1472-4782, E-ISSN 1476-9328, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 539-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on an abductive approach, a case study is performed on two Chinese multinational corporations (MNCs) operating in the construction equipment industry. These firms do not yet compete directly with major global firms. The reason for this is that Chinese firms have mainly built up international competitive strength in the low-price segment. A major result is a theory on the initial internationalisation strategy of Chinese firms. The main strategic counter-move by European MNC and other major incumbents seems to be to enter the low-price segment in emerging markets, for example, by acquiring local Chinese brands.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Kumar, Nishant
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Internationalisation of Indian knowledge-intensive service firms: Learning as an antecedent to entrepreneurial orientation2013In: Asian Business & Management, ISSN 1472-4782, E-ISSN 1476-9328, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 503-523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the early adoption of internationalisation by Indian knowledge-intensive service firms (KISFs) and their success in international markets. On the basis of extant literature, a tentative framework of international entrepreneurial and learning orientation is suggested and used to analyse empirical material gleaned from three case studies. The findings reveal how Indian KISFs leverage their entrepreneurial orientations in the pursuit of diverse international market opportunities, and sustain their entrepreneurial orientation through continuous efforts to learn from experience and the environment. The study provides empirical insights into early internationalisation of Indian KISFs, thus addressing a lacuna in this field.

  • 5.
    Söderman, Sten
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Jakobsson, Anders
    Soler, Luis
    A quest for repositioning: The emerging internationalization of Chinese companies2008In: Asian Business & Management, ISSN 1472-4782, E-ISSN 1476-9328, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 115-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When the third wave of internationalization appears in the near future, how will Chinese firms, especially small- and medium-sized companies (SMEs), position their products strategically? The framework of this paper is composed of price/volume segments and impacts on product strategy theory. The aim is to identify important drivers and focus areas for Chinese companies and measure what role these play in different segments. The survey is a quantitative study based on responses given in April 2006 by 102 Chinese EMBA students currently working, largely as managers, in the Shanghai region. The results indicate that Europe has potential to be a priority target market for Asian companies. Net flows, over time, illustrate how the respondents believe their companies are presently positioned and how they will be positioned in the 'future' (year 20 10). These net flows indicate that some Chinese companies will reposition themselves strategically when internationalizing and that they will focus on other factors or drivers when doing so, compared to companies adapting the prevalent price leadership strategy. The results should be seen as indicative and as presenting a template for deeper research.

  • 6.
    Yakhlef, Ali
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    The trinity of international strategy: Adaptation, standardization and transformation2010In: Asian Business & Management, ISSN 1472-4782, E-ISSN 1476-9328, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 47-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The significance of context has not escaped the attention of international strategy theorists. In entering foreign markets, firms are assumed to possess two strategic choices: context adaptation and/or standardization. This implies that context is a given and management action is reduced to adapting or not. Both approaches downplay management's ability to transform context. To redress this, this article seeks to emphasize the significance of transformation strategy, which aims not to passively adapt to the foreign context or settle for a standardization strategy, but to transform the context in the image of home conditions. Adopting a social constructivist approach, the paper argues that the context and content of strategy are intrinsically linked. Rather than just adapting or not to the target context of the foreign market, it is suggested that the extension of strategy from one context to another entails or requires the transformation of that context. To illustrate this, the article discusses IKEA's extension of its own strategy into the Chinese context. The article closes with some implications for the theory and practice of international marketing strategy. 

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