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  • 1.
    Andersson-Stråberg, Teresia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hellgren, Johnny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Perceptions of justice in connection with individualized pay setting2007In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 431-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Individualized pay is typically assumed to enhance employee work motivation, but a precondition for such beneficial effects is that employees perceive the pay-setting process to be fair. The aim of this study is to contribute to the understanding of the nature, determinants and consequences of pay justice. Questionnaire data, obtained from a Swedish nationally representative sample of nurses, provided support for distinguishing between distributive, procedural, interpersonal and informational justice. The results also showed that perceptions of pay justice were predicted by both work climate variables and factors related to the pay-setting procedure, even after controlling for demographic characteristics. Although pay justice had only marginal effects on employee work attitudes and behaviour when demographics, work climate and pay-related factors had been taken into account, justice was found to be an important goal in itself, given that a prerequisite for the success of any pay system is that it is perceived as fair.

  • 2.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Isaksson, Kerstin
    Bellaagh, Katalin
    Patterns of contract motives and work involvement in temporary work: Relations to work-related and general well-being2008In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 565-591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Temporary work is characterized by heterogeneity, and contract motives and work involvement are believed to differentiate temporary workers, which may explain their divergence in terms of subjective well-being. Applying a person-oriented approach using questionnaire data from a sample of Swedish temporary workers (N = 184), this study identified six patterns, characterized by distinct combinations of voluntary and involuntary contract motives and work involvement. While controlling for demo-graphics, comparative analyses found differences between these patterns in terms of work-related and general well-being. These findings indicate that knowledge about temporary work and its various consequences is enhanced by considering whole patterns instead of single variables in a person-oriented approach.

  • 3.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Staying in or switching between permanent, temporary and self-employment during 2008-2010: Associations with changing job characteristics and emotional exhaustion2019In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 215-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Labour market segmentation theories suggest that permanent and temporary workers are exposed to economic risks to different degrees, and differ in their working life quality and well-being. However, few studies have tested these ideas during times of economic crisis. Also, little is known about how the self-employed compare to permanent and temporary workers and are affected by economic downturns. This study investigated Swedish workers in different labour market segments before and after the financial crisis (2008 and 2010). More specifically, it looked at job characteristics and strain differences between permanent, temporary and self-employed workers. Data (N = 6335) came from SLOSH, a longitudinal representative cohort study of the Swedish workforce. Contradicting segmentation theories, differences between permanent and temporary workers were small. The self-employed stood out with favourable job characteristics, but comparable strain levels. During the crisis, work demands and strain declined for many of the workers studied here.

  • 4.
    Berntson, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The moderating role of employability in the association between job insecurity and exit, voice, loyalty and neglect2010In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 215-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exit, voice, loyalty, or neglect as employee responses to organizations in decline have been investigated in several studies. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether employability moderates the effects of job insecurity on exit, voice, loyalty and neglect. The results, based on questionnaire data from white-collar workers in Sweden (N = 725), indicate that individuals who are high in employability may have greater opportunities for gaining control over their working life. Job insecurity was found to be associated with increased exit as well as with decreased voice and loyalty, although these effects were stronger among individuals who perceived themselves to be employable. Thus, instead of making employees more likely to use voice in times of uncertainty, employability appears to primarily induce vocational mobility.

  • 5. Blom, Victoria
    et al.
    Richter, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Hallsten, Lennart
    Svedberg, Pia
    The associations between job insecurity, depressive symptoms and burnout: The role of performance-based self-esteem2018In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 48-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite agreement on the negative effects of job insecurity, more knowledge needs to be generated on the health effects in terms of burnout and depressive symptoms and for whom job insecurity has these negative effects. The present study aims to investigate the associations between job insecurity and burnout and depressive symptoms respectively, by studying the moderation influences of performance-based self-esteem (PBSE), a form of contingent self-esteem. A population-based sample with 4145 twins was used. The results showed that job insecurity was significantly associated with both burnout and depressive symptoms, and that PBSE acted as a moderator, so that the associations were stronger for individuals with high PBSE than for individuals with low PBSE. The study contributes by including a personality characteristic to gain more knowledge about the mechanisms of job insecurity on mental ill-health, and by illustrating that job insecurity has an impact on severe health outcomes in terms of burnout and depressive symptoms.

  • 6. De Witte, Hans
    et al.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    ‘Objective’ vs. ‘Subjective’ job insecurity: Consequences of temporary work for job satisfaction and organizational commitment in four European countries2003In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 149-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution analyses whether temporary work and (the subjective perception of) job insecurity are associated with a reduction in job satisfaction and organizational commitment, as proposed in the literature. An interaction between temporary work and job insecurity is also tested. Data from four European countries (Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy and Sweden) are used to test the robustness of the hypotheses. The results show that temporary work is not associated with a reduction in job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Job insecurity is associated with a lower score on both outcome variables, as hypothesized. In two countries, an interaction was found: job insecurity was only associated with a reduction in job satisfaction and organizational commitment among workers with a permanent contract, suggesting that the psychological contract was violated for this category of workers.

  • 7.
    Eib, Constanze
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. North-West University, South Africa.
    The interaction between organizational justice and job characteristics: Associations with work attitudes and employee health cross-sectionally and over time2015In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 549-582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates to what extent main and interactive effects of overall organizational justice and job characteristics shape employees’ work attitudes (organizational commitment, intention to stay) and health (mental health, somatic health) cross-sectionally and after a period of one year. Questionnaire data from 429 Swedish accountants show that generally both organizational justice and job characteristics had main effects on all outcomes at both time points. Interactions between organizational justice and job characteristics were found for every job characteristic studied (demand, control, support), for both time points but mainly for intention to stay and somatic health. The results show that perceptions of organizational justice and job characteristics can have additive and multiplicative synergetic effects for work attitudes and employee health.

  • 8.
    Häsänen, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hellgren, Johnny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hansson, Magnus
    Örebro universitet.
    Goal setting and plant closure: When bad things turn good2011In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 135-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has shown that closedowns seem to result in increased productivity even though allproductivity targets have been abandoned. The closedown case analysed in this article is differentfrom previous research since management came to employ high goals for productivity and efficiencythroughout the entire closedown process (29 months). The article argues that individuals gradually accept the demise and detach themselves from the dying organization by adopting new careergoals which they can start pursuing after the actual closure, thus the closure becomes a subgoal.

    This study examines change in the dependent variables’ mean values, and the relationships betweengoal setting, job performance, goal commitment, organizational citizenship behaviour (OCB), jobsatisfaction and job-induced tension. A longitudinal design (N = 151) based on two data points (T1:February 2006, T2: February 2007) were tapped into the annual goal setting process. The resultssupports that goal setting was effective in this specific closedown scenario.

  • 9.
    Kalyal, Hina Jawaid
    et al.
    NUST Business School, National University of Sciences and Technology, Pakistan.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Baraldi, Stephan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The moderating role of employability on the relationship between job insecurity and commitment to change2010In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 327-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of commitment to change is an underresearched area especially in non-western settings. The aim of the present study was to determine whether employability can moderate the negative effects of job insecurity on individuals’ commitment to change. A survey method approach was used to collect 149 responses from managers of a large public sector organization in Pakistan undergoing restructuring. Hierarchical multiple regression results suggest that employability is an important coping resource during organizational change as it helps mitigate the negative effects of job insecurity on the most desirable form of commitment to change, namely affective commitment to change. Theoretical and practical implications of the study are discussed.

  • 10.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Seddigh, Aram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. North-West University, South Africa.
    The roles of shared perceptions of individual job insecurity and job insecurity climate for work- and health-related outcomes: A multilevel approach2018In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 422-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to examine job insecurity from a multilevel perspective and to investigate the roles of two types of job insecurity - job insecurity climate and individual job insecurity - for work-related attitudes and health outcomes. It further explores the role of the workgroup - as a social context - in shaping job insecurity perceptions. Data were collected from white-collar employees in a Swedish organization, with 126 participants nested in 18 groups. The results show that 19% of the variance in job insecurity climate perceptions, and none of the variance in individual job insecurity perceptions, could be attributed to group membership. Further, compared to other members of their group, those perceiving a stronger job insecurity climate reported lower levels of negative self-rated health and higher burnout scores. These results imply that the workgroup is an important social context for job insecurity climate perceptions.

  • 11.
    Näswall, Katharina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    De Witte, Hans
    Who feels insecure in Europe?: Predicting job insecurity from background variables2003In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 189-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Along with the increased flexibilization of the labour market in Europe, there has been a change in the permanence and security of employment. Job insecurity is constituted by a subjectively experienced threat of having to give up one's job sooner than one would like. The experience of job insecurity has been linked to decreasing well-being, negative attitudes towards one's job and organization, and reluctance to stay with the organization. The present study investigates what groups experience higher levels of job insecurity than others. Survey data from four European countries (Belgium, Italy, the Netherlands and Sweden) were used to determine what characterizes individuals who experience high levels of job insecurity. The results show that employees in jobs characterized by manual labour, contingent workers, and to some extent older workers and those with lower levels of education, experience higher levels of job insecurity.

  • 12.
    Palm, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The declining influence of class and ideology in union membership: Consistent but divergent trends among Swedish employees2017In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using individual-level time-series data covering the period from 1990 to 2011, this article provides an empirical analysis of how the influence of various aspects of class and ideology on union organization have changed over time in the Swedish context. The primary results indicate that although union density and the influence of class-related aspects and ideology are decreasing, particularly among groups with traditionally high levels of organization, the general trend is not valid for all categories of employees. Rather, it appears that where the tradition of being organized is weaker, the influence of class and class identity is particularly strong. No evidence is identified that supports the thesis of class loyalty vanishing among the young.

  • 13.
    Richter, Anne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Job Insecurity and its Relation to Work-Family Conflict: Mediation with a Longitudinal Data Set2010In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 265-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research on the consequences of job insecurity has for the most part focused on individual as well as organizational outcomes, but rarely considered potential family consequences. Based on longitudinal data from Swedish teachers, the present study tests the relation between job insecurity and work-family conflict. In addition, workload was introduced as a mediator in order to contribute to the understanding of the mechanism relating the two phenomena. Gender differences were taken into account when testing this relation. The results provided partial support for workload as a mediator of the effects of job insecurity on subsequent work-family conflict. However, these results were found only for men, indicating gender differences in how job insecurity relates to workload and work-family conflict.

  • 14.
    Sousa-Ribeiro, Marta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. University of Porto, Portugal.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. North-West University, South Africa.
    Coimbra, Joaquim Luis
    Perceived quality of the psychosocial environment and well-being in employed and unemployed older adults: the importance of latent benefits and environmental vitamins2014In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 629-652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study combines two recognized theoretical frameworks in the (un)employment literature – the latent deprivation model and the vitamin model – and aims to better understand the relations between the perceived quality of the psychosocial environment and psychological well-being in older adults. The sample comprised 300 Portuguese adults (aged between 40 and 65), grouped as employed, unemployed engaged in training and unemployed not in training. The employed reported better well-being than the other groups, and the unemployed in training showed lower distress than those who were not. Additionally, features from both frameworks were found to be related to well-being. These findings highlight the merit of taking both theories into account to better understand the well-being of older individuals, and may be useful for the design of interventions aiming to enhance well-being and overcome some of the negative aspects of unemployment.

  • 15.
    Stengård, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Ishäll, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Understanding the determinants of well-being and organizational attitudes during a plant closure: A Swedish case study2015In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 611-631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated to what extent perception of closure management (informational justice, severance package satisfaction) as well as individual resources and barriers (employability, tenure) were associated with well-being and organizational attitudes during plant closure. This was studied in a sample of 129 Swedish workers in a plant undergoing closure. The results showed that those who felt communication to be fair reported higher well-being and more positive attitudes. Those who were satisfied with the severance package reported lower intention to leave but also felt fewer obligations towards the organization. Those with higher employability reported higher subjective health. The results also indicated that tenure moderated the relation between informational justice and felt obligations, and employability moderated the relation between severance package satisfaction and organizational attitudes. It can be concluded that closure management together with employees’ different resources and barriers are vital for organizational attitudes and well-being during the closedown process.

  • 16.
    Sverke, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    De Witte, Hans
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hellgren, Johnny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    European perspectives on job insecurity: editorial introduction2010In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 175-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The year 2010 represents an important year in job insecurity research, as represented by the publication of two special issues. In addition to the present one, the journal International Studies of Management & Organization publishes a special issue (Reisel and Probst, 2010) dedicated to the research initiative developed by Greenhalgh and Rosenblatt (1984). Some of the critical questions, then, concern how job insecurity research has evolved over the years, what new knowledge has been generated, and what aspects still deserve additional attention. These questions served as the background for a Small Group Meeting on ‘Job Insecurity in Europe: State of the Art and New Directions’, which we organized in Belgium in September 2008. The meeting, sponsored by the European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology and hosted by the K.U. Leuven, attracted 34 researchers from no less than 17 countries. The presentations advanced the understanding of the nature and measurement of job insecurity, focused on factors that may make employees more prone to experience uncertainty regarding the future of their jobs, highlighted outcomes that hitherto have not attracted much attention, and explored potential moderators and mediators of the insecurity–outcome relations. After the meeting, participants were subsequently invited to submit articles for potential inclusion in the present special issue, and we are proud to present a special issue with high-quality studies addressing important topics in contemporary job insecurity research.

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