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  • 1.
    Alexius, Susanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Furusten, Staffan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Enabling Sustainable Transformation: Hybrid Organizations in Early Phases of Path Generation2020In: Journal of Business Ethics, ISSN 0167-4544, E-ISSN 1573-0697, Vol. 165, no 3, p. 547-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapidly growing research on hybrid organizations in recent years suggests that these organizations may have particular abilities to facilitate institutional change. This article contributes to our understanding of change and, in particular, sustainable transformation in society by highlighting the importance of organizational forms. Looking more closely at the role of hybrid organizations in processes of path generation, we analyze the conditions under which hybrid organizations may enable path generation. A retrospective (1988–2017) exploratory case study of the Swedish hybrid organization The Natural Step confirms how hybrids can take part in- and may facilitate the early phases of path generation: assimilation and coalescence. The conclusion drawn is that hybrids have multivocal abilities that enable them to earn trust and authority to open up “neutral” spaces for orientation and connection between actors in separated sub-paths, and that this in turn may ease tensions and trigger dialogue and exchange, also between former opponents. Yet, as also seen in the case, this enabling position of the hybrid may be both fragile and temporary.

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  • 2.
    Butler, Nick
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Spoelstra, Sverre
    Redemption Through Play? Exploring the Ethics of Workplace Gamification2024In: Journal of Business Ethics, ISSN 0167-4544, E-ISSN 1573-0697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, it is becoming increasingly common for companies to harness the spirit of play in order to increase worker engagement and improve organizational performance. This paper examines the ethics of play in a business context, focusing specifically on the phenomenon of workplace gamification. While critics highlight ethical problems with gamification, they also advocate for more positive, transformative, and life-affirming modes of organizational play. Gamification is ethical, on this view, when it allows users to reach a state of authentic happiness or eudaimonia. The underlying assumption, here, is that the ‘magic circle’ of play—a sphere that exists entirely for its own sake—should be protected in order to secure meaningfulness at work. However, we argue that this faith in play is misguided because play, even at its most autotelic, is ethically ambivalent; it does not lead inexorably to virtuous work environments, but may in fact have an undesirable impact on those who are playing. Our study thus contributes to research on the ‘dark side’ of organizational play, a strand of scholarship that questions the idea that play always points toward the good life.

  • 3.
    Fang, Tony
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Gunterberg, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Larsson, Emma
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Sourcing in an Increasingly Expensive China: Four Swedish Cases2010In: Journal of Business Ethics, ISSN 0167-4544, E-ISSN 1573-0697, Vol. 97, no 1, p. 119-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    China has long enjoyed its position as the world's cheapest production country. However, this position is being shaken due to the increasingly rising costs in China in pace with China's rapid economic development. China's New Labour Contract Law which took effect from 1 January 2008 has further pushed the labour costs in China in general. The purpose of this article is to arrive at an in-depth understanding of why foreign firms conduct sourcing in China where sourcing is becoming increasingly expensive. The experiences of four Swedish companies in the textile and clothing industry (TCI) conducting sourcing in China are presented. Our findings show that sourcing in China is becoming both cost- and strategy-driven. Companies purely chasing the cheapest production would most probably consider leaving China, whereas companies with a long-term strategic intent and a high level of business ethics and corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices will retain all or most of their sourcing activities on the Chinese soil despite the rising costs.

  • 4.
    Grafström, Maria
    et al.
    Företagsekonomiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Windell, Karolina
    Företagsekonomiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    The Role of Infomediaries: CSR in the Business Press During 2000–20092011In: Journal of Business Ethics, ISSN 0167-4544, E-ISSN 1573-0697, Vol. 103, p. 221-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given the important role that business media play in corporate life, scarce attention has been paid to the role of media in the construction and popularization of corporate social responsibility (CSR). In this article, we understand media as a key infomediary and examine how the business press has framed and presented CSR over the last 10 years. Based on a content analysis of how CSR is presented in two English-language business newspapers with an international readership, we develop a framework for understanding the role of business media setting the corporate CSR agenda. The results show that business media contribute to the construction of what CSR means in corporate practice by creating links between CSR and certain corporate activities, between CSR and arguments that strengthen the view of CSR as a business case, and between CSR and certain spokespersons. These links contribute to create a notion of what CSR stands for, what it means in practice, and why it is important that one should pay attention to.

  • 5.
    Grimm, Julia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Ruehle, Rebecca C.
    Reinecke, Juliane
    Building Common Ground: How Facilitators Bridge Between Diverging Groups in Multi-Stakeholder Dialogue2024In: Journal of Business Ethics, ISSN 0167-4544, E-ISSN 1573-0697Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 6.
    Jensen, Tommy
    Umeå universitet.
    Beyond good and evil: the adiaphoric company2010In: Journal of Business Ethics, ISSN 0167-4544, E-ISSN 1573-0697, Vol. 96, no 3, p. 425-434Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Jensen, Tommy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Sandström, Johan
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    In Defence of Stakeholder Pragmatism2013In: Journal of Business Ethics, ISSN 0167-4544, E-ISSN 1573-0697, Vol. 114, no 2, p. 225-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article seeks to defend and develop a stakeholder pragmatism advanced in some of the work by Edward Freeman and colleagues. By positioning stakeholder pragmatism more in line with the democratic and ethical base in American pragmatism (as developed by William James, John Dewey and Richard Rorty), the article sets forth a fallibilistic stakeholder pragmatism that seeks to be more useful to companies by expanding the ways in which value is and can be created in a contingent world. A dialogue between a defence company and peace and arbitration society is used to illustrate the main plot of this article

  • 8. Longo, Cristina
    et al.
    Shankar, Avi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School. University of Bath, UK.
    Nuttall, Peter
    “It’s Not Easy Living a Sustainable Lifestyle”: How Greater Knowledge Leads to Dilemmas, Tensions and Paralysis2019In: Journal of Business Ethics, ISSN 0167-4544, E-ISSN 1573-0697, Vol. 154, no 3, p. 759-779Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Providing people with information is considered an important first step in encouraging them to behave sustainably as it influences their consumption beliefs, attitudes and intentions. However, too much information can also complicate these processes and negatively affect behaviour. This is exacerbated when people have accepted the need to live a more sustainable lifestyle and attempt to enact its principles. Drawing on interview data with people committed to sustainability, we identify the contentious role of knowledge in further disrupting sustainable consumption ideals. Here, knowledge is more than just information; it is familiarity and expertise (or lack of it) or how information is acted upon. We find that more knowledge represents a source of dilemma, tension and paralysis. Our data reveal a dark side to people’s knowledge, leading to a ‘self-inflicted sustainable consumption paradox’ in their attempts to lead a sustainable consumption lifestyle. Implications for policy interventions are discussed.

  • 9.
    Pratima, Verma
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Mohapatra, Siddharth
    Löwstedt, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Ethics Training in the Indian IT Sector: Formal, Informal or Both?2016In: Journal of Business Ethics, ISSN 0167-4544, E-ISSN 1573-0697, Vol. 133, no 1, p. 73-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethics training—an important means to foster ethical decision-making in organisations—is carried out formally as well as informally. There are mixed findings as regards the effectiveness of formal versus informal ethics training. This study is one of its first kinds in which we have investigated the effectiveness of ethics training as it is carried out in the Indian IT sector. We have collected the views of Indian IT industry professionals concerning ethics training (N = 266), and employed positivist (regression analysis and hierarchical linear modeling) and interpretive research (content analysis). We first have argued that the importance of the perception towards ethics has bearings not only on the individual ideologies but also on the organisational ethical values. In doing so, first we have conceptualised a theoretical framework: Perception of Ethics Training in Employees and Organisations (PETINEO). Second, we have studied the correlations between various components of this model. Third, we, under the rubric of PETINEO, examined the effectiveness of ethics training programmes for the Indian IT companies. Fourth, we have elaborated upon the results of our study. Our results suggest that the combination of both formal and informal means to undertake ethics training has superior impact on ethical decision-making in the Indian IT industry as compared to the use of any one of them in isolation.

  • 10. Rhodes, Carl
    et al.
    Munro, Iain
    Thanem, Torkild
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Pullen, Alison
    Dissensus! Radical Democracy and Business Ethics2020In: Journal of Business Ethics, ISSN 0167-4544, E-ISSN 1573-0697, Vol. 164, no 4, p. 627-632Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this introductory essay, we outline the relationship between political dissensus and radical democracy, focusing especially on how such a politics might inform the study of business ethics. This politics is located historically in the failure of liberal democracy to live up to its promise, as well as the deleterious response to that from reactionary populism, strong-man authoritarianism, and exploitative capitalism. In the context of these political vicissitudes, we turn to radical democracy as a form of contestation that offers hope in an affirmative, inclusive and sustainable alternative. On this basis we introduce the papers in the special issue as a collective exploration of the ethics and politics of radical democracy as manifesting in dissensus and the subversion of corporate and elite power by alternative democratic practices and realities.

  • 11.
    Rämö, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Visualizing the Phronetic Organization: The Case of Photographs in CSR Reports2011In: Journal of Business Ethics, ISSN 0167-4544, E-ISSN 1573-0697, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 371-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aspects of phronetic social science and phronetic organization research have been much debated over the recent years. So far, the visual aspects of communicating phronesis have gained little attention. Still organizations try to convey a desirable image of respectability and success, both internally and externally to the public. A channel for such information is corporate reporting, and particularly CSR reporting embrace values like fairness, goodness and sustainability This paper explores how visual portrayals of supposedly wise and discerning values (phronesis) are used to reinforce the verbal features of CSR reporting. The two propositions underlying this study is (1) that phronetic action in organizations is subjected not only to textual documentation but also to visual expressions, and (2) that visual images form some of the major parts of the structures of contemporary corporate reporting (particularly CSR reporting). The paper also discusses how the Aristotelian concept of phronesis can be linked to contemporary concerns about responsibility, and how this is visually represented in CSR reporting. Finally, the paper addresses the symbolic and contextual signification of images in corporate accounts of wisdom and responsibility.

  • 12.
    Schneider, Anselm
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Murray, John
    Escaping the Loop of Unsustainability: Why and How Business Ethics Matters for Earth System Justice2024In: Journal of Business Ethics, ISSN 0167-4544, E-ISSN 1573-0697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary society operates beyond safe boundaries of the Earth system. Returning to a safe operating space for humanity within Earth system boundaries is a question of justice. The relevance of the economy-and thus of business-for bringing society back to a safe and just operating space highlights the importance of business ethics research for understanding the role of business in Earth system justice. In this commentary, we explore the relevance of business ethics research for understanding the crucial role of business in the dynamics of the Earth system. We do so by integrating the perspectives of business ethics and system-oriented sustainability science on the basis of the theory of metabolic rift, which explains how the dynamics of capitalism result in the destruction of the natural environment. On this basis, we argue that a mutually reinforcing relationship between perpetual economic growth and profit seeking behaviour of business, which we call the loop of unsustainability, continually deepens the metabolic rift and keeps business from effectively contributing to Earth system justice. This perspective allows us to formulate firm-level and system-level preconditions for attaining Earth system justice, and to sketch a research agenda that links business ethics scholarship with questions of Earth system justice.

1 - 12 of 12
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