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  • 1.
    Bergkvist, Lars
    et al.
    University of Nottingham Ningbo, China.
    Kum, Doreen
    Lee, Yih Hwai
    Leong, Siew Meng
    Brand Personality Inference: The Moderating Role of Product Meaning2012In: Journal of Marketing Management, ISSN 0267-257X, E-ISSN 1472-1376, Vol. 28, no 11-12, p. 1291-1304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study draws on categorisation theory to investigate how consumers make brand personality inferences. Its purpose is to determine the basic category at which consumers make brand personality inferences and whether this level varies for functional and symbolic products. Experimental results show that the basic level of categorisation for brand personality inferences is the brand level for symbolic products and the product type level for functional products. These findings suggest that managers may have less latitude to adopt diverse personalities for functional than symbolic products. The study also demonstrates that, in contrast to prior work, future research on brand personality should consider a wider range of sources of personality.

  • 2.
    Fyrberg Yngfalk, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    ‘It’s not us, it’s them!’– Rethinking value co-creation among multiple actors2013In: Journal of Marketing Management, ISSN 0267-257X, E-ISSN 1472-1376, Vol. 29, no 9-10, p. 1163-1181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Marketing theory has conceptualised value co-creation through research on provider and consumer resource integrations. Little attention, however, has been devoted to how companies, consumers, and other stakeholders interact and co-create value in the context of multiple interactions. This study, therefore, explores co-creation by investigating the football experience, which is characterised by often-complex relations of multiple actors involved. Through a sociocultural perspective, actors’ resource integration is understood as being dependent on the shifting and contradicting interests of actors, which renders actors both enabled and also constrained in their interactive processes. This study demonstrates that actors’ contradictory resource integrations and interactions are fundamental for value to be co-created, since they give rise to new interpretations and meaning creations. In conclusion, the study reveals regulations, the media, and the collective strength of consumers to be unbalancing and yet creative mechanisms within the value co-creation process.

  • 3.
    Hartmann, Benjamin J.
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Östberg, Jacob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Marketing.
    Authenticating by re-enchantment: The discursive making of craft production2013In: Journal of Marketing Management, ISSN 0267-257X, E-ISSN 1472-1376, Vol. 29, no 7-8, p. 882-911Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an analysis of the way brand authentication operates through discursive enchantment as a series of ongoing negotiations among different market actors. We suggest that one specific type of enchantment, the concept of craft production, has been given too sparse attention in conceptualisations of authenticity. Through a qualitative multi-method inquiry based into the guitar subculture and a brand genealogy of the pseudo-Swedish guitar brand Hagstrom, we show how the rationalising trajectories of modernity can not only have disenchanting effects, but can also be dis-authenticating. We illustrate how various marketplace participants collectively engage in brand re-enchantment processes that provide the springboard for re-authenticating rationalised production through five enchanting craft discourses: vocation, dedication, tradition, mystification, and association.

  • 4.
    Hietanen, Joel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School. Aalto University School of Business, Finland.
    Andehn, Mikael
    More than meets the eye: videography and production of desire in semiocapitalism2018In: Journal of Marketing Management, ISSN 0267-257X, E-ISSN 1472-1376, Vol. 34, no 5-6, p. 539-556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the light of the recent proliferation of interest in videographic methods in marketing and consumer research, we wish to make a call for thinking critically about the medium. In this article, we challenge traditional means of semiotic analysis and consider contexts outside aesthetic symbolism that take into account wider agencements of videographic inquiry. We sensitise thinking about videographic production to include a broad scope of influence beyond production and spectatorship. By positing a mode of desiring relationalities in semiocapitalist' markets, and through the illustrative example of pop-music videos, we show how videography not only produces symbols, but also has the tendency to discipline the viewer into particular subjective positions. We hope to add to the conceptual toolkit of aspiring video scholars and encourage them to be increasingly critical and reflexive about their potential impact.

  • 5. Jaakkola, Matti
    et al.
    Frosen, Johanna
    Tikkanen, Henrikki
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Aspara, Jaakko
    Vassinen, Antti
    Parvinen, Petri
    Is more capability always beneficial for firm performance? Market orientation, core business process capabilities and business environment2016In: Journal of Marketing Management, ISSN 0267-257X, E-ISSN 1472-1376, Vol. 32, no 13-14, p. 1359-1385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the role of capabilities in core marketing-related business processes-product development management (PDM), supply chain management (SCM) and customer relationship management (CRM)-in translating a firm's market orientation (MO) into firm performance. The study is the first to examine the interplay of all three business process capabilities simultaneously, while investigating how environmental conditions moderate their performance effects. A moderated mediation analysis of 468 product-focused firms finds that PDM and CRM process capabilities play important mediating roles, whereas SCM process capability does not mediate the relationship between MO and performance. However, the relative importance of the capabilities as mediators varies along the degree of environmental turbulence, and under certain conditions, an increase in the level of business process capability may even turn detrimental.

  • 6.
    Lucarelli, Andrea
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Hallin, Anette
    Brand transformation: a performative approach to brand regeneration2015In: Journal of Marketing Management, ISSN 0267-257X, E-ISSN 1472-1376, Vol. 31, no 1-2, p. 84-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional brand management literature largely implies that the brand regeneration process is linear, atomistic and rather harmonic, thus reducing the complexity of the process to individual parts that can be managed rationally and logically in sequence. By ontologically as well as epistemologically adopting a performative approach where brands are seen as loose performative assemblages, the present article suggests instead that the brand regeneration process is truly processual, multiple and political. A specific brand regeneration process should be seen as relationally spatial and as only one of several possible ‘realities’. The argument is based on an analysis of a 5-year-long case study of the branding of Stockholm, inspired by a Latourian hybrid fieldwork approach. Based on the analysis, the novel concept ‘brand transformation’ is suggested to frame the characteristics and complexities of the brand regeneration process.

  • 7. Sklyar, Alexey
    et al.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Sörhammar, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Resource integration through digitalisation: a service ecosystem perspective2019In: Journal of Marketing Management, ISSN 0267-257X, E-ISSN 1472-1376, Vol. 35, no 11-12, p. 974-991Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As digitalisation increasingly encompasses entire service ecosystems, it modifies resource integration patterns that connect ecosystem actors through strong and weak ties. To clarify how technological development contributes to this change, and how resource integration transforms the service ecosystem, this qualitative case study explores the digitalisation strategy of a market-leading systems integrator in the maritime industry. Based on 40 depth interviews with managers, the findings show how technology increasingly serves as a key operant resource in the transformation of resource integration patterns. The study contributes to ecosystem dynamics research by identifying major differences between the pre-digitalised and digitalised states of a service ecosystem, and demonstrates the dual role of technology in both increasing pattern complexity and facilitating coordination of that complexity.

  • 8.
    Wikström, Solveig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    From e-channel to channel mix and channel integration2005In: Journal of Marketing Management, ISSN 0267-257X, E-ISSN 1472-1376, Vol. 21, no 7-8, p. 725-753Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on longitudinal research, this paper elucidates the evolution of the e-channel. The results show that that the e-channel is still of limited importance in many areas, when measured by market share. However, the new channel is an important source of information boosting both consumer power and capability. Another important result is that firms, as well as consumers, still perceive the e-channel as promising. One reason is that today’s time-pressed consumers are increasingly in need of affordable services to make their everyday life easier, which puts pressure on firms for developing an e-channel capable to perform cost efficient services. An additional result is that the e-channel and the physical channel do, in fact, complement each other rather than only compete. Therefore, to utilise the potential of the echannel, a service provider strategy of channel mix and channel integration is suggested.

  • 9.
    Yngfalk, Carl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Subverting sustainability: market maintenance work and the reproduction of corporate irresponsibility2019In: Journal of Marketing Management, ISSN 0267-257X, E-ISSN 1472-1376, Vol. 35, no 17-18, p. 1563-1583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While marketing’s potential to foster environmental sustainability has been acknowledged in sustainability marketing thinking, we still know little about the forms of organisational conduct through which sustainability recurrently fails to gain traction as a serious agenda in markets. Drawing on recent discussions on corporate irresponsibility and institutional work in markets, this article employs a discourse analysis to examine marketing managers’ strategies to legitimise food waste generation in the organisation of retail. The study highlights three interlinked strategies of institutional work for the subversion of sustainability and thus the reproduction of unsustainable excess production and consumption: the framing of environ- mental responsibility as risk, cost and consumer choice.

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