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  • 1. Bauer, Florian
    et al.
    Schriber, Svante
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Degischer, Daniel
    King, David R.
    Contextualizing speed and cross-border acquisition performance: Labor market flexibility and efficiency effects2018In: Journal of world business (Print), ISSN 1090-9516, E-ISSN 1878-5573, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 290-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is general agreement that acquisition integration is decisive for acquisition performance. Despite this consensus, there are heterogeneous results on integration measures, such as integration speed with empirical research supporting the benefits of either fast or slow integration. We argue that the business environment surrounding acquisitions has the potential to reconcile conflicting findings. We develop how institutional factors (i.e., labor market flexibility and efficiency) influence the relationships between speed of human and functional integration on acquisition performance. With a sample of 203 transactions from acquirers from central Europe and Scandinavia, we find human and functional integration speed have divergent effects on acquisition performance. Further, both relationships are moderated by labor market flexibility and efficiency, but in different ways. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  • 2. Ghauri, Pervez
    et al.
    Fang, Tony
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Negotiating with the Chinese: A socio-cultural analysis2001In: Journal of world business (Print), ISSN 1090-9516, E-ISSN 1878-5573, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 303--325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    China has been one of the most favorite markets for Western firms for the last decade. However, doing business with China is considered difficult, mainly because negotiating with Chinese counterparts is quite complex. This paper analyses the negotiation process with China from a socio-cultural perspective. A Swedish multinational, Ericsson, is followed for several years and its negotiation process for different Chinese projects in the telecommunication industry is studied in depth. Based on these cases and literature a model is developed and some conclusions are drawn. Finally, managerial implications presented as four Ps: Priority, Patience, Price and People sum up the essence of Chinese business negotiation process.

  • 3. Meyer, Klaus E.
    et al.
    Fang, Tony
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Panibratov, Andrei Y.
    Peng, Mike W.
    Gaur, Ajai
    International business under sanctions2023In: Journal of world business (Print), ISSN 1090-9516, E-ISSN 1878-5573, Vol. 58, no 2, article id 101426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sanctions are a tool used by political actors to induce foreign countries, firms or individuals to alter their behavior. As nonmilitary coercive measure, they have the potential to disrupt the international business environment, often on short notice, and change the rules of the game. Synthesizing the available evidence on the economic and political impacts of sanctions, we explore how sanctions disrupt the institutional framework for international business and how firms respond to sanctions. Based on a review of available scholarly evidence, we discuss how theories of international business, such as institution-based view, resource-and knowledge-based view, resource dependency theory, and behavioral theories of the firm, can contribute to explaining the impact of sanctions. At the same time, we discuss how sanctions, as politically motivated disruptions, challenge some assumptions underlying these theories. Going forward, our research agenda on sanctions is likely to help firms and governments to strategize in a geopolitically sensitive world.

  • 4. Stendahl, Emma
    et al.
    Tippmann, Esther
    Yakhlef, Ali
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Practice creation in multinational corporations: Improvisation and the emergence of lateral knowledge2022In: Journal of world business (Print), ISSN 1090-9516, E-ISSN 1878-5573, Vol. 57, no 3, article id 101287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lateral collaboration across subsidiaries is beneficial for innovation in multinational corporations (MNCs), such as the creation of new organizational practices, because it helps working towards shared, rather than subsidiarycentric, objectives and creates new knowledge. To instill lateral collaboration, prior research has mainly focused on coordination mechanisms that rely on interpersonal exchanges among dispersed individuals across subsidiaries. However, due to rising concerns over coordination cost and sustainability of international travel, MNCs are increasingly challenged to search for other approaches that require less direct interpersonal interaction across subsidiaries. We, therefore, ask: How can MNCs elicit lateral collaboration during practice creation in a less space-time sensitive way? Drawing on a longitudinal case study, we develop a model of practice creation in MNCs. Our model offers two main insights. First, it details a novel approach for unleashing the benefits of lateral collaboration in globally-linked innovation processes in MNCs. In contrast to emphasizing coordination mechanisms that focus on interpersonal interactions across subsidiaries, our study contributes by detailing the emergence of lateral knowledge through a shared technological artefact as key enabler. Second, our model illuminates how MNCs can innovate new organizational practices that reflect both MNC and local subsidiary needs by adopting an improvisational approach.

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