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  • 1.
    Ahrne, Göran
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Brunsson, Nils
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Organization outside organizations: The significance of partial organization2011In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 83-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is common practice in organizational research to restrict the concept of organization to formal organizations, and to describe the world outside these entities by such other concepts as institutions or networks. It is argued in this article that the concept of organization can be fruitfully broadened to include some aspects of the order that exists outside and among organizations. A broader concept includes not only complete, formal organization, but also 'partial organization'. Both types of organization are based on decisions, but whereas complete organizations have access to all elements of organization, partial organization is based on only one or a few of these elements. Like complete organization, partial organization is a common phenomenon that not least characterizes much of the contemporary global order. The authors discuss how partial organization arises, how and why institutions and networks sometimes become organized, and the consequences of organization for change, transparency and accountability.

  • 2.
    Ahrne, Göran
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Brunsson, Nils
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Tamm Hallström, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Organizing organizations2007In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 619-624Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Lindgren, Monica
    Packendorff, Johann
    Responsibilising the next generation: Fostering the enterprising self through de-mobilising gender2017In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 892-915Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, our interest is in what subjectivities are fostered among schoolchildren through the recent introduction of entrepreneurship initiatives in primary and secondary school. The educational terrain is but one example where entrepreneurship has been discursively transformed during recent decades from the notion of starting businesses into a general approach to life itself in the advancement of neoliberal societies. The inherently elitist and excluding position of the entrepreneurial subject is now offered to all and sundry. While entrepreneurship pedagogy is explicitly intended to be gender neutral and inclusive of all such identities traditionally suppressed in the entrepreneurship discourse, we ask what kind of enterprising selves are mobilised and de-mobilised here. Second, in what way are these seemingly gender-neutral' enterprising selves gendered? Our analysis of three recent and dominating entrepreneurial initiatives in the Swedish school system emphasises the need for activation, performativity and responsibility. The analysis also shows that gender is indeed silenced in these initiatives but is at the same time productive through being subtly present in the promotion of a neo-masculine', active, technology-oriented and responsible subject. Entrepreneurship is presented as being equally available for all and something everyone should aspire to, yet the initiatives still sustain the suppression and marginalisation of women and femininities. The initiatives specifically promote a responsible and adaptive masculine subject position while notions of rebellious entrepreneurship and non-entrepreneurial domestic positions are mobilised out of the picture.

  • 4.
    Butler, Nick
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Delaney, Helen
    Spoelstra, Sverre
    Risky business: Reflections on critical performativity in practice2018In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 428-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Critical scholars in the business school are becoming increasingly concerned about the impact of their research beyond the confines of academia. This has been articulated most prominently around the concept of critical performativity'. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with critical leadership scholars, this article explores how academics engage with practitioners at the same time as they seek to maintain a critical ethos in relation to their external activities. While proponents of critical performativity tend to paint a frictionless picture of practitioner engagementwhich can take the form of consulting, coaching, and leadership developmentwe show how critical scholars may end up compromising their academic values in corporate settings due to practitioner demands and other institutional pressures. Taken together, these pressures mean that critical scholars often need to negotiate a series of (sometimes insoluble) dilemmas in practitioner contexts. We argue that the concept of critical performativity is unable to contend meaningfully with these tensions because it replicates the myth of the heroic-transformational academic' who is single-handedly able to stimulate critical reflection among practitioners and provoke radical change in organizations. We conclude with a call for further reflection on the range of ethical dilemmas that can arise during academic-practitioner engagement.

  • 5.
    Cederström, Carl
    et al.
    Cardiff University, UK.
    Marinetto, Michael
    Cardiff University, UK.
    Corporate social responsibility á la the liberal communist2013In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 416-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the ‘liberal communist’, a conceptual and satirical figure originally elaborated in the work of Slavoj Žižek (2008). The liberal communist claims (1) that there is no opposition between capitalism and the social good; (2) that all problems are of a practical nature, and hence best solved by corporate engagement and (3) that hierarchies, authority and centralized bureaucracies should be replaced by dynamic structures, a nomadic lifestyle and a flexible spirit. This analysis of the liberal communist has at least two implications for research on CSR. First, it examines the ideological role of CSR by moving beyond a propaganda view, instead offering an ideological reading that focuses on the ways in which CSR seeks to obliterate any existing contradictions between ‘philanthropic actions’ on the one hand and ‘profit-seeking business activities’ on the other hand. Second, it demonstrates how critique is not necessarily what corporations seek to avoid, but something that they actively engage in.

  • 6.
    Cederström, Carl
    et al.
    Cardiff University, UK.
    Spicer, André
    City University London, UK.
    Discourse of the real kind: A post-foundational approach to organizational discourse analysis2014In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 178-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In response to the postmodern invasion of organization studies, some critics have issued increasingly loud cries that we should ‘get real’ about organizational discourse analysis. But what precisely do these proponents take to be the ‘real’? In this article we trace out some of the attempts of ‘getting real’, arguing that these approaches have some important limitations. We then explore the relevance of a post-foundational approach to discourse, which, we argue, have far reaching implications for the study of organizational discourse. We argue that such approach offers us a way of theoretically linking the ‘real’ with (1) the way discourses are structured around fundamental gaps, (2) how discourses are brought together through nodal points and (3) how discourses generate affective and emotional attachment. We then offer some suggestions of how these points can be used to study organizational processes. We conclude by reflecting on some of the limitations of this approach to studying discourse.

  • 7. Fleming, Peter
    et al.
    Roberts, John
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    In search of corporate social responsibility: introduction to special issue2013In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 337-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This introduction to the special issue aims to contextualize and critically comment on the current trajectory of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in both scholarly inquiry and business practice. It suggests that we must place it within the milieu of the ongoing economic crisis and the failure of a number of important opportunities to make business ethical (e.g.   the 2012 Rio + 20 Earth Summit). It then suggests possible future terrain for tenable CSR research (and practice), especially in the context of widespread cynicism and disbelief regarding the claims of business ethicists in industry and the academy.

  • 8.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Grey, Chris
    Cambridge University.
    How to become oneself: Discourses of subjectivity in postbureaucratic organizations1997In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 211-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the face of widespread organizational change which some claim heralds the demise of bureaucracy, and in the context of the cultural and intellectual uncertainties of postmodernism, how do people in organizations respond? In this paper, we explore the role of `How To' books for managers in the elaboration of these responses. How To books may be read as part of a long-standing tradition of self-help which represents a form of the secularized Protestant ethic. However, in contemporary conditions it is also congruent with emerging forms of reflexivity and projects of the self. The How To books we discuss promise to yield control of the world around them to managers who learn to know and control their `inner-worlds'. They also offer techniques of self-presentation and self-appraisal which, we argue, are particularly congruent with the likely control problems within post-bureaucratic organizations.

  • 9.
    Hietanen, Joel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School. Aalto University, Finland.
    Rokka, Joonas
    Companion for the videography 'Monstrous Organizing-The Dubstep Electronic Music Scene'2018In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 320-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This companion essay contributes to video-based organizational research by critically assessing conventional representational modes of videographic practice and conceptualizing an expressive' ontology for videographic research. We offer an image of thought that foregrounds the creative and powerfully affective potential of both videographic work and spectatorship. To advance this perspective and to inspire future research, we present our videography (length 30 minutes) that integrates various 'expressive' elements in montage form. We use the film to scrutinize the potential of video-based research and several methodological considerations tied to it. In doing so, we argue that video-based organizing of research activities can be seen as monstrous', an entire emergent mode of aesthetic storytelling that comes into being not in capturing' or recording', but rather as an affective production of potentialities.

  • 10.
    Holmqvist, Mikael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Maravelias, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Skålén, Per
    Karlstad University, Serv Res Ctr CTF, Karlstad.
    Identity regulation in neo-liberal societies2013In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 193-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article studies the formation and regulation of individual identities among a group of people who after long periods of unemployment are put in a specialized work program for so called ‘occupationally disabled’ individuals. In contrast to its official aim to activate and rehabilitate participants back to the labour market, the study suggests that the work program constitutes the participants as passive and unable to meet the criteria of employability on the labour market. The term ‘occupationally disabled’ emerges not as a medical label referring to already existing, inner characteristic of the individuals concerned, but as an identity that they take on as they pass through the work program. The article contributes to existing research of the formation and regulation of individual identities in organizations in two regards: first, by showing how medicine participates in the formation and regulation of individual identities in organizations, and second, by relating the formation and regulation of individual identities to broader societal issues concerning neoliberal government. Our study suggests that there is a tendency in neo-liberal societies to combine medical and economic expertise into a ‘medico-economic discourse’ within which issues concerning individuals’ activity and agency are transformed into matters of illness and disability. That is, whereas active and self-governing individuals are governed as parts of a high-performing segment of the working population, our study suggests that passive and dependent individuals tend to be governed not just as parts of a low performing segment of the working population, but also as a disabled segment.

  • 11.
    Jensen, Tommy
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Sandström, J
    Helin, S
    Corporate Codes of Ethics and the Bending of Moral Space2009In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 529-545Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Murray, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Nyberg, Daniel
    Rogers, Justine
    Corporate political activity through constituency stitching: Intertextually aligning a phantom community2016In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 908-931Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corporations play an increasingly significant role in public policy and democratic politics. This article seeks to understand how corporate political activities gain political influence through intertextual strategies. The analysis is conducted on the texts produced by the Australian government in proposing a new tax as well as the texts produced by the mining industry in campaigning against the tax. We show how the government texts represent the proposed tax as a fair opportunity, while the mining industry texts represent the tax as an unfair threat. The findings attend to the processes of how the mining industry stitched' together constituencies in support of their representation. This article contributes to the existing literature on corporate political activity by showing how overt and indirect corporate activities and communications influence public policy agendas. It also contributes to critical studies of corporate political activity by theorizing how textual strategies can be used to align corporate interests in hegemonic political struggles through the creation of a phantom community. Finally, the article contributes to theories of intertextuality by developing a typology to analyse textual representation.

  • 13. Pullen, Alison
    et al.
    Rhodes, Carl
    Thanem, Torkild
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Affective politics in gendered organizations: Affirmative notes on becoming-woman2017In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 105-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current approaches to the study of affective relations are over-determined in a way that ignores their radicality, yet abstracted to such an extent that the corporeality and differentially lived experience of power and resistance is neglected. To radicalize the potential of everyday affects, this article calls for an intensification of corporeality in affect research. We do this by exploring the affective trajectory of ‘becoming-woman’ introduced by Deleuze and Guattari. Becoming-woman is a process of gendered deterritorialization and a specific variation on becoming-minoritarian. Rather than a reference to empirical women, becoming-woman is a necessary force of critique against the phallogocentric powers that shape and constrain working lives in gendered organizations. While extant research on gendered organizations tends to focus on the overwhelming power of oppressive gender structures, engaging with becoming-woman releases affective flows and possibilities that contest and transgress the increasingly subtle and confusing ways in which gendered organization affects people at work. Through becoming-woman, an affective and affirmative politics capable of resisting the effects of gendered organization becomes possible. This serves to further challenge gendered oppression in organizations and to affirm a life beyond the harsh limits that gender can impose.

  • 14.
    Rämö, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Marketing.
    Spatio-Temporal Notions and Organized Environmental Issues - An Axiology of Action2004In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 849-872Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to bring together temporal and spatial notions into a different set of axiologic pairs, and to trace examples in which such a set of pairs might be illuminating in accounts of how environmental issues are perceived in various social science disciplines. The paper begins with a division of time into reified clock time(chronos) and timely kairos time, together with a spatial division between abstract space (chora) and concrete place (topos). To better comprehend these originally Greek spatial and temporal notions, some Aristotelian concepts of human action will also be used (i.e. theoria/episteme, poiesis/techne and praxis/phronesis). These extended notions of human action, time and space/place are discussed in conjunction with aesthetics, ethics and environmental issues in the different organizational settings of science, mass media, business management and environmentalism.

  • 15.
    Thanem, Torkild
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    All talk and no movement? Homeless coping and resistance to urban planning2012In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 441-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Privileging the discursive expression of micro-resistance while exploiting spatial metaphors such as cynical distancing and escape, recent work in Critical Management Studies (CMS) has tended to find resistance everywhere without actually examining its spatial whereabouts. Utilizing a spatial approach, this article therefore investigates how homeless people in Stockholm not only resisted but also coped otherwise with two urban planning projects that intended to drive them away from two public places. Whereas some of the homeless subverted the planners’ intentions by returning, others confirmed their intentions by leaving. The article further discusses the nomadic nature of these movements and how they were related to homeless discourses of apathy, cynicism and contentment. Finally, it discusses what implications this may have for homeless people and urban planning organizations, and for the understanding of resistance in CMS.

  • 16.
    Thanem, Torkild
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Living on the edge: Towards a monstrous organization theory2006In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 163-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the recent curiosity for monsters in social and organizational research, this paper questions the power, purity and boundaries of organization by accentuating its risky encounters with heterogeneous, monstrous bodies. In an attempt to problematize organization theory’s implicit dissociation of monsters from organization, the understanding and treatment of monsters is traced across a variety of discursive formations in Western history—from Medieval and Renaissance theology and medicine, via Classical life science, freak shows and contemporary performance art, to recent social science and organization theory. Invoking Deleuze and Guattari’s (1988) work on creative involution, the paper goes beyond previous social and organizational research in thinking the radicality of monsters, and it concludes with an argument for a monstrous organization theory that: (i) encourages organizational researchers to critically reflect about their own monstrosity; (ii) challenges the stigmatization of monstrous embodiment; and (iii) delves into bodies that live on the edge and disrupt organizational boundaries

  • 17.
    Thanem, Torkild
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Wallenberg, Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    Just doing gender? Transvestism and the power of underdoing gender in everyday life and work2016In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 250-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While previous research in organization studies has utilized transgender to show how gender is done, overdone and undone, this literature lacks empirical grounding, and the theoretical arguments dominating it tend to idealize the transgressive power of transgender while reducing transgender to hyperbolic drag and stereotypical passing. To further advance the understanding of transgender within and around organizations, this article presents a qualitative study from a Northern European country to investigate how male-to-female transvestites do and undo gender in everyday life and work. In contrast to extant research, we found that participants did transgender and undid gender by underdoing gender, that is, by combining feminine, masculine and ungendered practices and attributes in ways that made passing and drag insignificant. As transvestites simultaneously expressed masculine and feminine forms of embodiment, we argue that they may more obviously challenge, though not dismantle, dominant forms of gender and identity than suggested by previous accounts. We conclude by discussing broader implications for the understanding of gender, identity, power and resistance in organizations.

  • 18.
    Thanem, Torkild
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Wallenberg, Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Fashion Studies.
    What can bodies do? Reading Spinoza for an affective ethics of organizational life2015In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 235-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent attempts to develop an embodied understanding of ethics in organizations have tended to mobilize a Levinasian and “im/possible” ethics of recognition, which separates ethics and embodiment from politics and organization. We argue that this separation is unrealistic, unsustainable, and an unhelpful starting point for an embodied ethics of organizations. Instead of rescuing and modifying the ethics of recognition, we propose an embodied ethics of organizational life through Spinoza’s affective ethics. Neither a moral rule system nor an infinite duty to recognize the other, Spinoza offers a theory of the good, powerful and joyful life by asking what bodies can do. Rather than an unrestrained, irresponsible and individualistic quest for power and freedom, this suggests that we enhance our capacities to affect and be affected by relating to a variety of different bodies. We first scrutinize recent attempts to develop an ethics of recognition and embodiment in organization studies. We then explore key concepts and central arguments of Spinozian ethics. Finally, we discuss what a Spinozian ethics means for the theory and practice of embodied ethics in organizational life.

  • 19.
    Yakhlef, Ali
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Essén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Practice innovation as bodily skills: the example of elderly home care service delivery2013In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 881-903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Heideggerian strand of organization studies has highlighted important aspects of organizational practices. Because of the emphasis of the practice-oriented approach on routine practice, researchers have taken a special interest in how innovative, improvised action arises. One of the dominant views is that innovative action is the outcome of different variations in everyday practices. Insightful though these studies are, they do not recognize the role of the body in their conceptualization. This article seeks to redress this imbalance by drawing on Merleau-Ponty's (1962) phenomenology, suggesting that the body, as a carrier of practices, is the locus of innovative action. The article proposes that innovative action emerges in our bodily expressive-responsive skilful coping mode. In illustrating this argument, we make use of case study material focusing on practices involving elderly care service provision. We show how the care workers under consideration cope with the demands of their unpredictable work by adapting their bodily expressive-responsive abilities innovatively to emerging situational calls. Practice innovation emerges as the outcome of a tension between what it makes sense for the care workers to do based on the practical intelligibility underlying their own practices, on the one hand, and bureaucratic rules and requirements inscribed in terms of economic rationality and cost-efficiency, on the other. Because bureaucratic rules are perceived as alienating and unethical, innovation would inevitably be a form of resistance. The article specifies this form of practical resistance, concluding with some implications of this approach for organization studies.

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