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  • 1.
    Andersson, Therése
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Fashioning the fashion princess: mediation—transformation—stardom2012In: Journal of Aesthetics & Culture, E-ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 4, no 1, article id 5331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is she looking as royal as can be? Dressing the part of a princess? Popular media texts, such as magazines completely devoted to celebrity matters, dealing with reports on who is wearing what at which occasion, provide the empirical outset for this textual study on the representations of the Scandinavian princesses of today: Mary (Denmark), Mette-Marit (Norway), Victoria (Sweden) and Madeleine (Sweden). In this article the princesses are, on a theoretical level, considered stars with their own images, images constructed in a similar way as film stars, with fashion and appearance as the focal point. In popular media texts, such as the Swedish woman’s magazine Svensk Damtidning, the styles of the princesses are scrutinised, compared and evaluated. These mappings are in this way further examined, and the topics surrounding the representations are surveyed. The themes selected for supplementary examination are personal style and Cinderella narrative, as they emerge as intimately interrelated with fashion. The epithet princess, in the sense ‘‘what a princess ought to look like’’, is given in terms of aestheticised appearance: body, fashion and personal style, is thus discussed and theorised throughout the article. Hence, the purpose of this article is to examine the roll of dress and the matter of appearance concerning the representations of the Scandinavian princesses, relating to the themes of style and consumption, as well as the transformation narratives. How are these royal styles constructed, on a designer level as well on a thematic level?

  • 2.
    Becker, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Brecevic, Geska Helena
    Veneration and Wonder: The politics of making art in an Oaxacan village2014In: Journal of Aesthetics & Culture, E-ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines a 5-year collaboration between the Stockholm-based video artists Performing Pictures and Talleres Comunitarios, a studio based in the Oaxacan town of Santa Ana Zegache where local artisans employ traditional skills in the restoration of religious artifacts. In images and text, we trace the exchange of skills, knowledge, and aesthetic sensibility that took place as these two groups of artists collaborated in producing a series of video animations of venerative objects, against a backdrop of religious, social, and political tensions that characterize everyday life in Zegache. In the article and the accompanying series of three short films, ‘‘Wonder & Veneration 13’’ (http://vimeo. com/album/2682070), we examine how the artists negotiate questions of aesthetics and religious belief as their collaboration unfolds within the context of the Zegache community, where the Talleres contribute skills of carpentry and painting, while Performing Pictures provides skills of film, animation and micro-electronics. The processes and practices involved in creating three works provides the framework for this examination: the first, an animation of the Virgin of Guadalupe as she appears to a simple peasant, and the second, produced 2 years later, an animation of Santa Ana, local patron saint and mother of Maria, as she teaches her daughter to read the scriptures. Whereas both figures are central to the syncretic religious belief of southern Mexico with its challenge to the entrenched authority of the hispanicized clergy, the local figure of Santa Ana carries even more complex meanings for the community of Zegache. These meanings are embodied in the third work we examine, a small solarpowered chapel that the artists built to display the Santa Ana animation. With the mayor’s support and located at the entrance to the town, the chapel embodies a shift of power away from the church, standing as an example of indigenous empowerment in civil society.

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    Veneration and Wonder
  • 3.
    Becker, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Frosh, Paul
    Visual Frictions2015In: Journal of Aesthetics & Culture, E-ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 30347Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Visuality is an increasingly contested phenomenon. Rarely stable and never “pure,” the visual is always intertwined with other senses and expressive forms and is often implicated in multiple power relations. Whether as part of social and cultural practices, or as utilized in social scientific inquiry and investigation, the visual exerts a power that continues to challenge and be challenged by other ways of knowing. This power is especially apparent when we consider visuality in its digital manifestations: as visually based media expand their purview across social, cultural, and geographic space we find they are often in “friction” with established norms, structures, and modes of expression. In this themed issue of the Journal of Aesthetics and Culture, the authors have been invited to explore these issues, under the rubric of “Visual Frictions.”

  • 4.
    Bodin, Per-Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.
    The holy fool as a TV hero: about Pavel Lungin’s film The Island and the problem of authenticity2011In: Journal of Aesthetics & Culture, E-ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 3Article, book review (Refereed)
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    Fulltext
  • 5. Economou, Konstantin
    et al.
    Lindgren, Anne-Li
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Childhood re-edits: challenging norms and forming lay professional competence on YouTube2015In: Journal of Aesthetics & Culture, E-ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 28953Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the initial findings of research into how YouTube culture can become an arena for young YouTube videographers to remodel mainstream, sub-cultural, and media content (YouTube clips, music, film content, and viral memes). We juxtapose analyses from both media and child studies to look at the ways in which preferred images and notions of the “good” and idyllic childhood are re-edited into a possible critique of the prescribed Swedish childhood. Also, we look at ways in which these media-literate actors use YouTube to display their skills in both media editing and social media “savvy.” We discuss how “lay” professional competence in digital culture can be inherent in a friction between popular (children's) culture and social media production, where simultaneous prowess in both is important for how a mediatised social and cultural critique can emerge.

  • 6.
    Florin, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Confronting The Wind: a reading of a Hollywood film by Victor Sjöström2009In: Journal of Aesthetics & Culture, E-ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 1, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Koivunen, Anu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Confessions of a Free Woman: telling feminist stories in postfeminist media culture2009In: Journal of Aesthetics & Culture, E-ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since its inception in late 1980s, the notion of postfeminism has been a highly contested term. While today circulating as an established description of ‘‘prime time feminism,’’ a highly visible media discourse of gender and sexuality that foregrounds individualism and consumerist tropes of choice and empowerment, its meanings for feminism as political agenda and cultural criticism nevertheless remain a point of disagreement. Is postfeminist discourse of gender and sexuality to be seen as a sign of second-wave feminism being partially incorporated into mainstream narratives? Or, rather, does it articulate a historical shift within feminist thought and cultural imaginary itself, or even a break-up with or a rejection of feminist historical legacy? In this article, these issues are investigated through a reading of a six-hour documentary Flying*Confessions of a Free Woman 1-6 (Jennifer Fox 2007, Easy Films, Denmark and Zohe Film Productions, USA) as a case of highbrow postfeminist television. Investigating how the documentary constructs an account of ‘‘the modern female life’’ in a global perspective, the article argues that Flying both articulates a sense of historicity and denies it. While never uttering the f-word, in its refiguring domestic ethnography as a mode of autobiographical self-interrogation, the documentary series evokes, albeit implicitly, a number of key tropes of 1960-1970s radical feminism: the notion of personal as political, the investment in consciousness-raising as a form of activism, the emphasis on shared experiences and emotions, and the idea of global sisterhood. As a consequence, it is argued, feminist critique is acknowledged and actualized only as an incitement to communication (sharing) and community-building in an affirmative sense. In this postfeminist story of feminism, hence, dissonant and critical voices are excluded as politics is reduced to an affect.

  • 8.
    Koskinen, Maaret
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Ingmar Bergman: the biographical legend and the intermedialities of memory2010In: Journal of Aesthetics & Culture, E-ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 2, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Noheden, Kristoffer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    The Imagination of Touch: Surrealist Tactility in the Films of Jan Švankmajer2013In: Journal of Aesthetics & Culture, E-ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is a theoretical examination of tactility in the Czech surrealist filmmaker Jan Švankmajer’s film Down to the Cellar (1983). Švankmajer’s deployment of tactile images in a surrealist context shows the need for a discussion of the imagination’s role in the embodied film experience. Departing from Laura Marks’s The Skin of the Film, this article seeks to explore the surrealist embodied imagination through surrealist poetics of analogy, as defined by Andre´ Breton, and the link between these and Walter Benjamin’s writings on mimesis. Finally, the film is viewed from the perspective of Gaston Bachelard’s ideas of ‘‘the imagination of matter,’’ where matter is seen as a highly potent stimulant for the imagination. Bachelard’s notion of the imagination’s multisensory properties further lends credence to Švankmajer’s aims to liberate the imagination of the spectator through images that invoke touch.

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  • 10.
    Rosenberg, Tiina
    Lunds universitet.
    On Feminist Activist Aesthetics2009In: Journal of Aesthetics & Culture, E-ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses some trends in critical theory and activist aesthetics in contemporary feminist performing arts in Sweden. The 2000s have witnessed at least two “turns” in feminist theory, namely the affective turn and the social, or as it is called here, the solidarity turn. The status of poststructuralist theory has been widely debated and Marxist, class-based analyses have returned to the political and aesthetic agenda in Sweden. The focus has shifted – once again – from individual art making to collectives who have chosen to work and fight together. The backdrop of this discussion is the shift from a social democratic welfare state to a neoliberal one. In civil society the distinction between neoliberal and social democratic lies in the extent of personal freedom(s), including sexual and reproductive rights, and whether interpersonal engagements are marked by commercialisation and inequality or by mutuality and equality.

  • 11.
    Soila, Tytti
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Passion at the threshold: Doctor Glas the flaneur in the films of Rune Carlstén and Mai Zetterling"2010In: Journal of Aesthetics & Culture, E-ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores tropes of modernity in film adaptations of the 1905 novel Doctor Glas written by the Swedish author Hjalmar Söderberg. Drawing on Walter Benjamin and Miriam Hansen among others, the article attempts to show that certain expressive categories perceived as mutually exclusive by the contemporary audiences, in fact co-operate in order to constitute certain ‘‘points of impossibility’’ in the narrative and visual flow, where modern (gender) identities mutate and manifest themselves.

  • 12.
    Sundholm, John
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för humaniora och genusvetenskap.
    Visions of Transnational Memory2011In: Journal of Aesthetics & Culture, E-ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 3, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper is a short introduction to the ‘‘global turn’’ in memory studies and to transnational memory in particular. Both culturalist and normative positions are presented. After the conceptual overview, there follows an analysis of two films, Auf der anderen Seite (2007) and Cache´ (2005), with special focus on the two notions ‘‘translocal’’ and ‘‘inclusive distinction’’, and on the theme of an ethics and morality of memory. This is in order to explicate the usefulness and importance of the notion of transnational memory. Finally, the concluding remark is made that research into transnational memory is significant due to its recognising of small-scale trajectories and memory practices beyond the framework of the nation, and because of the subtle dialectics between an ethics and morality of memory - thus leading to a persistent ‘‘transnational monitoring’’ of the national as well.

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    Fulltext
  • 13.
    Sundholm, John
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för humaniora och genusvetenskap.
    Velicu, Adrian
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för humaniora och genusvetenskap.
    Introduction to the dossier on transnational cultural memory2011In: Journal of Aesthetics & Culture, E-ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 3Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This section of the Journal of Aesthetics and Culture is dedicated to the theme of transnational cultural memory. The papers of the dossier are written for the second meeting of the Summer School of the Nordic Research Network of memory studies, funded by NordForsk, hosted this year by Karlstad University on 20-21 June 2011.   The dossier displays various approaches to the emerging topic of transnational memory studies, encompassing topical themes such as the remediation of transcultural memory, the ethics of memory in the age of globalization, the dynamics of cultural memory in the (re)-making of the national and the transnational, visions of transnational memory, the transnational archive, and socio-spatial aspects of the experience of displacement. The introductory papers are written by scholars from various backgrounds: history of ideas, philosophy, cultural geography, film studies, and literary studies, thus adhering to the principle of constituting memory studies as a truly interdisciplinary field.

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    Fulltext
  • 14.
    Söderbergh Widding, Astrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Andersson, Lars Gustaf
    Lunds universitet.
    Sundholm, John
    Karlstads universitet, Avdelningen för humaniora och genusvetenskap.
    Editorial2011In: Journal of Aesthetics & Culture, E-ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 1article id 9422Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Söderbergh Widding, Astrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Andersson, Lars Gustaf
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Sundholm, John
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Editorial2010In: Journal of Aesthetics & Culture, E-ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 2, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
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    fulltext
  • 16.
    Söderbergh Widding, Astrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Cinema Studies.
    Andersson, Lars Gustaf
    Sundholm, John
    Editorial2009In: Journal of Aesthetics & Culture, E-ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 1, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Thanem, Torkild
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Wallenberg, Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Fashion Studies.
    Buggering Freud and Deleuze: Towards a queer theory of masochism2010In: Journal of Aesthetics & Culture, E-ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 2, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both Freud’s and Deleuze’s understandings of masochism limit the transgressive and subversive forces of masochism by taking sexual difference for granted. Drawing on Newton’s fashion photography for Wolford and on feminist interrogations of Freud, Deleuze and masochism, this paper therefore seeks to develop an alternative, queer theory of masochism as sexual indifference. Viewing masochism as sexual indifference opens up movements of desire beyond the heterosexual matrix of male masochists and female mistresses. This is therefore an exercise in buggery. In the first half of the paper we bugger Freud’s understanding of masochism with Deleuze’s diverging understanding of masochism. In the second half we bugger Deleuze’s understanding of masochism with other parts of his own work, with feminist critique, and with Newton’s photography.

  • 18.
    Uimonen, Paula
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Mourning Mandela: sacred drama and digital visuality in Cape Town2015In: Journal of Aesthetics & Culture, E-ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 28178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The world united in unprecedented ways in mourning the global icon Nelson Mandela, an emotionally charged historical event in which digital visuality played an influential role. The memorial service for Nelson Mandela on Tuesday, 10 December 2013, gathered dignitaries and celebrities from around the world at the First National Bank Stadium in Johannesburg, to mourn the passing of Madiba and to celebrate his life work. At the Grand Parade in Cape Town, the event was broadcast on large public screens, followed by live music performances and narrowcast interaction with the audience. Building on recent research on public screens during global media events, this article addresses the mediated mourning rituals at the Grand Parade in terms of a sacred drama. Focusing on social relationality, the article discusses how digital visuality mediated a sense of global communitas, thus momentarily overcoming historical frictions between the global north and the global south, while expanding the fame of Madiba. Paying attention to the public display of visual memory objects and the emotional agency of images, it argues that digital visuality mediated social frictions between the living and the dead, while recasting a historical subject as a historical object. The article further discusses how digital visuality mediated cultural frictions of apartheid and xenophobia, through the positioning of Mandela in the pantheon of Pan-African icons, thus underlining the African origin of this global icon. The analysis is based on ethnographic observations and experiences in Cape Town.

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    fulltext
  • 19.
    van Ooijen, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Literature and History of Ideas, History of Literature.
    Cinematic shots and cuts: on the ethics and semiotics of real violence in film fiction2011In: Journal of Aesthetics & Culture, E-ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 3, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I discuss a few ethical and semiotic problemsrelated to reality’s ability to actually take place within, andbreak through, fictional representations. I am particularlyconcerned with the presence of material bodies in theperforming arts. I consider Hideshi Hino’s Flower of Fleshand Blood (Ginıˆ piggu 2: Chiniku no hana, 1985) as aninitial example of purely fictional film violence. From abrief presentation of traditional theatre semiotics and theconcept of a fictive stance, I then discuss two specific filmswhere the body of the actor functions not only as thecarrier of symbolical meaning but also as an indexicalreference to a factual situation: John Waters’ Pink Flamingos(1972) and Ruggero Deodato’s Cannibal Holocaust(1980). My main interest lies in the occurrence of realviolence, and particularly animal killings, in exploitationcinema. By considering directors’ own statements on thematter, I suggest that such violence can not simply bedismissed as ethically flawed; rather, it carries a potentialcritique of the ideology of meat as pure commodity.

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    fulltext
  • 20.
    Wrethed, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    I am a place: Aletheia as Aesthetic and Political Resistance in Margaret Atwood’s Surfacing2015In: Journal of Aesthetics & Culture, E-ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article investigates the aesthetic and political power of Margaret Atwood’s 1972 novel Surfacing. It argues that the novel’s perennial vitality is partly explained by Jacques Rancière’s theory about the aesthetic regime of art that highlights the tension between art for art’s sake and art as a political instrument. By means of phenomenological methodology and concepts, mainly derived from Martin Heidegger and Maurice Merleau-Ponty, the examination uncovers an experiential aesthetics intimately intertwined with the protagonist’s perceptions throughout the narrative. These perceptions and impressions are permeated by a sense of semi-religious revelation. But here they are primarily seen from an epistemological perspective through the dominance of immediacy (denoted by the Greek aletheia) over verificational dimensions (denoted by the Roman veritas). These predominantly sensory aspects of Surfacing make up the aesthetic nerve that is linked to the political impact of the work. Aletheia functions as a promise of emancipation since it transcends the political division of the sensory, that is, art for art’s sake and art as life. But, Atwood’s work also upholds this separation since aletheia is ultimately autonomous, which in turn sustains the autonomy of the novel. It is claimed that the persistent status of Surfacing—and thereby its sustained political impact—is ultimately due to its aesthetic integrity. The novel’s more explicit political concerns of ecocriticism and feminism are secondary in relation to the force of aletheia.

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