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  • 1. Ness, Ottar
    et al.
    Borg, Marit
    Semb, Randi
    Topor, Alain
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Negotiating partnerships: parents' experiences of collaboration in community mental health and substance use services2016In: Advances in Dual Diagnosis, ISSN 1757-0972, E-ISSN 2042-8324, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 130-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The importance of collaboration in the mental health field is a well established theoretical principle, but there has so far been less attention to its practical implications from a parents' perspective. The purpose of this paper is to describe parents' experiences of collaboration with mental health practitioners. Design/methodology/approach - This was a qualitative study based on thematic analysis of multi-stage focus group discussions with ten parents of young adults with co-occurring mental health and substance use problems. Findings - The authors identified three major themes related to family member's experiences of collaborative practices: negotiating partnerships, incomprehensible services and being the young adult's advocate. Research limitations/implications - A potential limitation of this study is that the parents who agreed to take part in this study were all part of the population who really want to be involved in their relative's care; other family members who did not take part may have different feelings. It would be interesting to interview the siblings and partners of young adults with mental health and substance abuse problems. A last limitation is that only family parents participated in these focus group discussions; it would be interesting to invite service users and practitioners to elicit information about similarities and differences in their experiences of collaborative practices. Practical implications - This study emphasises that parents should be seen as unique individuals as well as families. Parents are persons in different contexts. This creates different needs in their collaboration with the professionals. Parents want to be invited to contribute with their experiences and knowledge, being a collaborative partner in the service provision, and not a burden for their young adults, or to the professionals. Social implications - This study emphasises that it may be important to understand the complex situations of each family parent, supporting their loved ones and at the same time living lives of their own. Families are in demanding and stressful situations often over many years. They want to be invited to contribute with their experiences and knowledge, being a collaborative partner in the service provision, and not a burden for their young adults, or to the professionals. Originality/value - The importance of collaboration is well established in in the mental health field. However, there has been less attention to what collaboration with parents might involve in practice. This paper describes the collaborative experiences of parents of young adults (18-28 years) with co-occurring mental health and substance use problems.

  • 2.
    Skogens, Lisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    von Greiff, Ninive
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Topor, Alain
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Initiating and maintaining a recovery process - experiences of persons with dual diagnosis2018In: Advances in Dual Diagnosis, ISSN 1757-0972, E-ISSN 2042-8324, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 101-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate the internal and social factors that persons with experience from severe mental illness and alcohol and other drugs problems, and who have received treatment for these problems, describe as important for initiating and maintaining a recovery process.

    Design/methodology/approach - In total, 40 persons were interviewed and asked to describe factors they perceived as important for initiating and maintaining recovery. The software Nvivo was used to categorise data in internal and social factors with subcategories.

    Findings - There is significant variation in how recovery emerged but involved in general having a proper social situation and finding meaning in life. Initially, the majority had a marginalised situation with need of assistance with housing, employment, financial and social support.

    Research limitations/implications - The change process in the investigated group is interpreted as related to individual resources rather than belonging to a group defined as having double trouble.

    Practical implications - The study implies that in addition to professional help to handle diagnosed problems, the group in focus also need support and interventions that address individual complex needs.

    Social implications - Supporting activities/peer support seem to be important for those lacking support from family. At the same time, it is important to recognise the risk of being forced into a recovery identity which might lead to worsening the situation for those who do not fit into this.

    Originality/value - By using the same design as in previous studies, comparisons with other groups are possible while still keeping the qualitative meaning of the investigated factors.

  • 3.
    Topor, Alain
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Skogens, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    von Greiff, Ninive
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Building trust and recovery capital: the professionals' helpful practice2018In: Advances in Dual Diagnosis, ISSN 1757-0972, E-ISSN 2042-8324, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 76-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The possibility of recovery for persons with co-occurring addiction and mental health problems has been contested. Though, recent studies show that recovery might happen, but without connection to specific treatment interventions. The purpose of this paper is to analyse professionals' perceptions of their contribution to improvement.

    Design/methodology/approach - In all, 15 experienced professionals were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using thematic analysis.

    Findings - Recovery processes were dependent of the persons' access to different forms of recovery capital (RC). Lack of RC was often associated with lack of trust in one's self and others (identity and personal capital). Professionals had to be accepted as trustful agents through co-creating changes in the person's life. Trusting a professional might be a basis for trusting one's self as an agent in one's recovery process and develop a social network (identity and relationship capital). Other aspects stressed by the professionals were to manage their own fragmentized organisations and societal shortcomings (economic capital).

    Practical implications - Recovery has been described as a profoundly individual journey. However, it is also deeply social, involving other persons and contextual factors. Focusing on just one level might counteract the complex work behind double recovery.

    Originality/value - Improvement was described as dependent on the presence of personal, inter-personal, organisational and societal factors. The findings give a deep and concrete understanding of the process constituting the development of a working alliance and its dependence on factors outside the direct relation between the staff member and the person.

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