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  • 1. Bindler, Richard
    et al.
    Karlsson, Jon
    Rydberg, Johan
    Karlsson, Björn
    Berg Nilsson, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Biester, Harald
    Segerström, Ulf
    Copper-ore mining in Sweden since the pre-Roman Iron Age: lake-sediment evidence of human activities at the Garpenberg ore field since 375 BCE2017In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 12, p. 99-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Historical documents, archaeological evidence and lake-sediment records indicate thus far that significant mining of iron and copper ores in the Berglsagen mining region in central Sweden did not begin until the late 12th century -first with iron in Norberg - and thereafter spreading rapidly throughout the region during the 13th century when also copper was included (e.g. Falun). Prior to this, iron was produced domestically from secondary sources such as bog iron, while geochemical analyses of bronze artefacts indicate copper was imported. The parish of Garpenberg was at the intersection between historical iron-and copper-mining districts, and consequently we expected our sediment record from the lake Gruvsjon ('mine lake') to follow the established 13th century development. However, a 2-3-fold enrichment in copper and lead occurred already during 375-175 BCE (pre-Roman Iron Age), together with small increases in zinc, magnesium and charcoal particles, and changes in pollen. Together these indicate a clear pattern of human disturbance connected with the ore body bordering the lake. A second distinct phase occurred 115-275 CE, but with an 8-9-fold increase in copper and lead along with other indicators. From 400 CE a permanent increase in copper and lead occurred, which then accelerated from the 13th century as seen elsewhere in the region. Our results push back the evidence for early ore mining in Sweden from the Middle Ages to the pre-Roman Iron Age.

  • 2. Boethius, Adam
    et al.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Hongslo Vala, Cecilie
    Apel, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory. Lund University, Sweden.
    The importance of freshwater fish in Early Holocene subsistence: Exemplified with the human colonization of the island of Gotland in the Baltic basin2017In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 13, p. 625-634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore the subsistence economy of the Mesolithic pioneers on the island of Gotland in the Baltic basin, in order to evaluate the importance of freshwater fish to the Early Holocene human population. By analysing faunal remains, the distribution of 14C dates and the location of the settlement sites, we argue that earlier assumptions concerning the importance of marine mammals to the early human populations should be reconsidered. We suggest that the pioneering settlers of Gotland relied on fish to a significant extent. Radiocarbon dates taken from human bones are skewed by a freshwater reservoir effect, which can be used as an indirect indication of the significance of freshwater fish. The numerous, overgrowing lakes on the island, with their extensive biomass production and large amounts of freshwater fish, provided an important subsistence base. Even if the faunal assemblages that have survived are dominated by seal bones, the hunting season for seals was limited and the hunters mostly targeted young seals. Thus, the importance of seal have previously been overestimated and it appears that the human use of marine resources on Gotland was more limited and related to raw material needs rather than dietary necessity or specialization. Although presented as a case study; the results highlight the need to identify a freshwater fish diet among ancient foragers on a larger scale, as implications thereof can fundamentally change how foraging societies are perceived.

  • 3.
    Charpentier Ljungqvist, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Seim, Andrea
    The spatiotemporal distribution of Late Viking Age Swedish runestones: A reflection of the Christianisation process and its speed2018In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 21, p. 849-861Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Late Viking Age Swedish runestones are commonly acknowledged as early Christian monuments. Using geostatistical techniques and descriptive statistics, we systematically investigate the regional-to-local spatiotemporal patterns of 1302 ornamentally dated Swedish runestones regarding the timing and speed of the Christianisation process. After quantitative geostatistical analyses of the age distribution patterns of Swedish runestones, we evaluate whether the observed patterns correspond to the pace and pattern of Christianisation, as represented by the presence of mission bishoprics, early church sites, late pagan grave sites and royal estates. We identify seven distinct age groups of runestones and statistically significant regional-to-local spatiotemporal differences in the age and age spread of runestones. The oldest runestones, with the smallest age spread, are found in south-western medieval Sweden, and the youngest, as well as the largest age spread, in the north-east, respectively. We find that runestones are significantly older close to early ecclesiastical sites, regardless of the analytical level, and significantly younger near to late pagan graves. The results obtained are inconclusive as to whether runestones are older near royal estates. Our results support that the spatiotemporal patterns of runestone sites mirror the timing of the Christianisation process and that geostatistical approaches to larger archaeological or historical data sets can add new dimensions to the understanding of the spatial dimensions of past societal changes.

  • 4.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Frei, Karin Margarita
    Howcroft, Rachel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Gummesson, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Molin, Fredrik
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Frei, Robert
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Diet and mobility among Mesolithic hunter-gatherers in Motala (Sweden) - The isotope perspective2018In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 17, p. 904-918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent excavations at the sites of Strandvägen and Kanaljorden in Motala, Eastern Central Sweden, have unearthed complex and varied funerary remains from the Mesolithic. The two sites are situated on opposite banks of the river Motala Ström. While geographically close and roughly covering the same time span (c. 8000–7000 cal. BP), the funerary remains reveal differences and similarities in the treatment of the dead between the two localities. While at Strandvägen human bones were mostly found either scattered along the river bed or in inhumation graves, Kanaljorden contains wetland depositions of disarticulated skulls. We have conducted multi-isotope analyses of δ13C, δ15N, δ34S and 87Sr/86Sr of human and animal remains with the aim of reconstructing the dietary patterns, geographic provenance and mobility of the interred. A series of faunal reference samples and, in the case of 87Sr/86Sr, soil samples have been analysed in order to establish relevant isotopic baselines. The results show a protein intake dominated by aquatic resources, probably consisting of both freshwater and marine fish in varied proportions. The strontium isotope data indicate an interesting distinction between the individuals buried on either side of the river Motala Ström. Five out of six sampled individuals from Strandvägen have isotope ratios consistent with a local provenance, whereas ratios from seven out of eight Kanaljorden individuals indicate a non-local origin. The δ34S analysis proved problematic as a majority of the samples appear to be affected by diagenesis. This is probably the result of contamination by exogenous sulphur from surrounding fluvial and lacustrine sediments, as has previously been reported from other waterlogged sites.

  • 5. Fraser, Magdalena
    et al.
    Sanchez-Quinto, Federico
    Evans, Jane
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Wallin, Paul
    Knutsson, Kjel
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    New insights on cultural dualism and population structure in the Middle Neolithic Funnel Beaker culture on the island of Gotland2018In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 17, p. 325-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years it has been shown that the Neolithization of Europe was partly driven by migration of farming groups admixing with local hunter-gatherer groups as they dispersed across the continent. However, little research has been done on the cultural duality of contemporaneous foragers and farming populations in the same region. Here we investigate the demographic history of the Funnel Beaker culture [Trichterbecherkultur or TRB, c. 4000–2800 cal BCE], and the sub-Neolithic Pitted Ware culture complex [PWC, c. 3300–2300 cal BCE] during the Nordic Middle Neolithic period on the island of Gotland, Sweden. We use a multidisciplinary approach to investigate individuals buried in the Ansarve dolmen, the only confirmed TRB burial on the island. We present new radiocarbon dating, isotopic analyses for diet and mobility, and mitochondrial DNA haplogroup data to infer maternal inheritance. We also present a new Sr-baseline of 0.71208 ± 0.0016 for the local isotope variation. We compare and discuss our findings together with that of contemporaneous populations in Sweden and the North European mainland.

    The radiocarbon dating and Strontium isotopic ratios show that the dolmen was used between c. 3300–2700 cal BCE by a population which displayed local Sr-signals. Mitochondrial data show that the individuals buried in the Ansarve dolmen had maternal genetic affinity to that of other Early and Middle Neolithic farming cultures in Europe, distinct from that of the contemporaneous PWC on the island. Furthermore, they exhibited a strict terrestrial and/or slightly varied diet in contrast to the strict marine diet of the PWC. The findings indicate that two different contemporary groups coexisted on the same island for several hundred years with separate cultural identity, lifestyles, as well as dietary patterns.

  • 6. Fraser, Magdalena
    et al.
    Sjödin, Per
    Sanchez-Quinto, Federico
    Evans, Jane
    Svedjemo, Gustaf
    Knutsson, Kjel
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Wallin, Paul
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    The stone cist conundrum: A multidisciplinary approach to investigate Late Neolithic/Early Bronze Age population demography on the island of Gotland2018In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 20, p. 324-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Late Neolithic period in Scandinavia [LN, c. 2350-1700 cal BCE] marks a time of considerable changes in settlement patterns, economy, and material culture. This shift also lays the foundation for the demographic developments in the Early Bronze Age [EBA, c. 1700-1100 cal BCE]. However, little is presently known regarding the developments from these time-periods on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea. During the Middle Neolithic period [MN, c. 3300-2350 cal BCE], Gotland was inhabited by groups associated with the Funnel Beaker culture [TRB, c. 4000-2700 cal BCE], and the sub-Neolithic Pitted Ware culture [PWC, c. 3300-2300 cal BCE]. Some indications of connections with the Bathe Axe/Corded Ware cultures [BAC/CWC, c. 2800-2300 cal BCE] have also been found, but no typical BAC/CWC burials have been located on the island to date. Here, we investigate the chronological and internal relationship of twenty-three individuals buried in four LN/EBA stone cist burials; Haffinds, Hagur, Suderkvie, and Utalskog on Gotland. We present eleven mitochondrial genomes [from 23 X to 1271 X coverage], and twenty-three new radiocarbon dates, as well as stable isotope data for diet. We examine the local Sr-baseline range for Gotland, and present new Sr-data to discuss mobility patterns of the individuals. The genetic results are compared and discussed in light of earlier cultural periods from Gotland [TRB and PWC], and CWC from the European continent, as well as contemporaneous LN secondary burials in the MN Ansarve dolmen. We find that all burials were used into the EBA, but only two of the cists showed activity already during the LN. We also see some mobility to Gotland during the LN/EBA period based on Strontium and mitochondrial data. We see a shift in the dietary pattern compared to the preceding period on the island [TRB and PWC], and the two LN individuals from the Ansarve dolmen exhibited different dietary and mobility patterns compared to the individuals from the LN/EBA stone cist burials. We find that most of the cist burials were used by individuals local to the area of the burials, with the exception of the large LN/EBA Haffinds cist burial which showed higher levels of mobility. Our modeling of ancestral mitochondrial contribution from chronologically older individuals recovered in the cultural contexts of TRB, PWC and CWC show that the best model is a 55/45 mix of CWC and TRB individuals. A 3-way model with a slight influx from PWC [5%] also had a good fit. This is difficult to reconcile with the current archaeological evidence on the island. We suggest that the maternal CWC/TRB contribution we see in the local LN/EBA individuals derives from migrants after the Scandinavian MN period, which possible also admixed with smaller local groups connected with the PWC. Further genomic analyses of these groups on Gotland will help to clarify the demographic history during the MN to EBA time periods.

  • 7. Fraser, Sheena
    et al.
    Elsner, Julia
    Hamilton, W. Derek
    Sayle, Kerry L.
    Schlumbaum, Angela
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Matrilines in Neolithic cattle from Orkney, Scotland reveals complex husbandry patterns of ancestry2017In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 14, p. 46-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    mtDNA, isotopic and archaeozoological analyses of cattle teeth and bones from the Late Neolithic site of Links of Noltland, Orkney, Scotland revealed these animals followed similar grazing regimes but displayed diverse genetic origins and included one cattle skull that carried an aurochs (wild cattle) genetic haplotype. Morphometric analyses indicate the presence of some cattle larger than published dimensions of Neolithic domestic cattle. Several explanations for these finding are possible but may be the evidence of a complex pattern of domestic cattle introductions into Neolithic Orkney and interbreeding between domestic and wild cattle.

  • 8.
    Gummesson, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Molin, Fredrik
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Taphonomy, bone surface characteristics and assemblage history: Finding Mesolithic bone depositions at Strandvägen, Motala2017In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 13, p. 11-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through taphonomic analyses, in this studywe evaluate bones surface characteristics and differences in bone accumulation on a Mesolithic settlement site, in Eastern Middle Sweden. The assemblage consists of faunal remains fromthe Mesolithic but also fromactivities dating to historical periods. All bones fromthe site, including indeterminate fragments, were analysed. Variation in bones surface characteristics were registered according to a set of taphonomic data, based on previously published studies. The variation were categorized as different texture scores and evaluated against species representation, radiocarbon datings and spatial distribution. The study underlines the potential of methodological approaches to taphonomic data and underlines the importance of including indeterminate fragments when studying human utilization of bones. The results present strong correlations between different species, bone tools and specific surface textures. It shows that a large part of the assemblage is of Mesolithic origin but also that activities dating to post-Mesolithic periods have contributed to the assemblage accumulation. Spatial analyses of the different surface textures helped to identify and separate Mesolithic activity areas of the site, thus providing an understanding of the spatial organization at intra site level, at the settlement of Strandvägen.

  • 9.
    Krzewinska, Maja
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Bäckström, Ylva
    Ingvarsson, Anne
    Kashuba, Natalija
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Rodríguez Varela, Ricardo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Girdland-Flink, Linus
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Elucidating recent history by tracing genetic affinity of three 16th century miners from Sweden2018In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 19, p. 651-657Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Sala Silver Mine in central Sweden was an important manufacturer of silver from at least the 16th till the early 20th century, with production peaking in the 16th, mid 17th and 19th centuries. The job opportunities offered by the mine attracted people to the area resulting in the development of a small township with an associated cemetery in the vicinity of the mining center. People affiliated to the mine were buried on the cemetery for around 150 years. Written sources reveal that common criminal convicts from Sweden-Finland and war prisoners from the numerous wars fought by Sweden during the time were exploited in the mine, and some of them were likely buried on the cemetery. The cemetery has been excavated on several occasions and the recovered human remains were divided into two different groups based on burial custom, demography and biochemical results. One group was believed to contain war prisoners; the aim of this study was to produce and interpret genomic data from these individuals to test if their genetic ancestry is consistent with the hypothesis that they were non-locals. Materials: Teeth from seven different individuals were sampled for dentine. Results: Three of the analyzed teeth contained sufficient amounts of endogenous human DNA for the generation of genomic sequence data to a coverage of 0.04, 0.19 and 0.83, respectively. Discussion: The results show that despite seeming heterogeneity the three individuals grouped within the range of genetic variation of modern and contemporary Swedes, yielding no statistical support to the hypothesis that they were foreign captives. However, due to the lack of contemporary or modern Danish genomic data we cannot refute these individuals originated in Denmark which was suggested as one of possible sources of the 17th century Swedish prisoners of war.

  • 10. Lundström, Maria
    et al.
    Forsberg, Nils
    Heimdahl, Jens
    Hagenblad, Jenny
    Leino, Matti W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. Linköping University, Sweden; Swedish Museum of Cultural History, Sweden.
    Genetic analyses of Scandinavian desiccated, charred and waterlogged remains of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)2018In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 22, p. 11-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Barley, Hordeum vulgare L., has been cultivated in Fennoscandia (Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland) since the start of the Neolithic around 4000 years BCE. Genetic studies of extant and 19th century barley landraces from the area have previously shown that distinct genetic groups exist with geographic structure according to latitude, suggesting strong local adaptation of cultivated crops. It is, however, not known what time depth these patterns reflect. Here we evaluate different archaeobotanical specimens of barley, extending several centuries in time, for their potential to answer this question by analysis of aDNA. Forty-six charred grains, nineteen waterlogged specimens and nine desiccated grains were evaluated by PCR and KASP genotyping. The charred samples did not contain any detectable endogenous DNA. Some waterlogged samples permitted amplification of endogenous DNA, however not sufficient for subsequent analysis. Desiccated plant materials provided the highest genotyping success rates of the materials analysed here in agreement with previous studies. Five desiccated grains from a grave from 1679 in southern Sweden were genotyped with 100 SNP markers and data compared to genotypes of 19th century landraces from Fennoscandia. The results showed that the genetic composition of barley grown in southern Sweden changed very little from late 17th to late 19th century and farmers stayed true to locally adapted crops in spite of societal and agricultural development.

  • 11.
    Papakosta, Vasiliki
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Oras, Ester
    Isaksson, Sven
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Early pottery use across the Baltic – A comparative lipid residue study on Ertebølle and Narva ceramics from coastal hunter-gatherer sites in southern Scandinavia, northern Germany and Estonia2019In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 24, p. 142-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Late Mesolithic Ertebølle and Narva cultures (6th – 5th/4th millennium BC) in the southwest and eastern Baltic, respectively, shared similar vessel types, namely pointed-based pots and oval bowls. As a consequence, this phenomenon raised questions about inter-cultural connections across the Baltic and possible influence for the production of pottery from the Narva to the Ertebølle hunter-gatherers. Whereas the two pottery traditions were shown to be different with regards to raw materials and manufacture, in this study we further attempt a comparison on the basis of function using a lipid residue analysis approach. The aim is to examine whether typological analogies were based on common functional requirements. This paper presents new evidence for the use of Ertebølle ceramics in the southwest Baltic from the analysis of pottery samples from a number of coastal sites in southern Sweden (Scania) and eastern Denmark (Lolland). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC–MS) and gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-c-IRMS) analysis were performed on the absorbed lipid residues to determine their structural characteristics and the stable carbon isotopic composition of selected fatty acids. Results are discussed and compared with analogous published data of Narva ceramics from Estonia. Data from other coastal sites in Denmark and northern Germany are also included for wider comparison. Based on our findings, we conclude that despite little variability in the isotope values of residues, Ertebølle and Narva pots did not serve the same functional demands, and different motives led to their production. Whilst the Narva ceramics appear to have had a specialized role in processing aquatic products, the Ertebølle were more multi-purpose vessels, used also for terrestrial animal and plant resources.

  • 12. Saage, Ragnar
    et al.
    Wärmländer, Sebastian K. T. S.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, UCLA, USA.
    Metal residues in 5th c. BCE-13th c. CE Estonian tools for non-ferrous metal casting2018In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 19, p. 35-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates Estonian tools for non-ferrous metal casting in the form of crucibles, moulds, and casting ladles dating to the Estonian Iron Age (500 BCE-1227 CE), adding elemental analysis and 3D modelling to the traditional typological comparison. In contrast to the neighbouring countries of Russia, Latvia, and Sweden, no comprehensive study has previously been published on this subject for Estonian material. The typological analysis sets Iron Age Estonia in the same metalworking tradition as that of other eastern Baltic countries and Northwestern Russia. However, some classes of casting tools present in Scandinavian and Slavonic areas have so far not been encountered in the Estonian archaeological record. The elemental analysis included qualitative pXRF analysis of 175 artefacts and detailed residue analysis using SEM-EDS of thirteen selected artefacts. This analysis identified for the first time Estonian Iron Age casting tools - crucibles - used for casting gold and silver. Most of the investigated crucibles were used for casting various copper alloys, while the casting ladles and most of the stone moulds were used for casting pewter. Casting of pewter and precious metals only occurred in regional centres such as hill forts and strongholds, while copper alloys were cast in all parts of Estonia. In addition to clarifying fundamental questions about Estonian Iron Age metal casting, this study also lays a foundation for using modern analytical techniques in future investigations of Estonian metalworking traditions.

  • 13. Smith, Kevin N.
    et al.
    Vellanoweth, Rene L.
    Sholts, Sabrina B.
    Wärmländer, Sebastian K. T. S.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. UCLA, USA.
    Residue analysis, use-wear patterns, and replicative studies indicate that sandstone tools were used as reamers when producing shell fishhooks on San Nicolas Island, California2018In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 20, p. 502-505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elucidating the tools and production steps involved in manufacturing the characteristic circular shell fishhooks found on the California Channel Islands has been a long-standing problem in California archaeology. A prehistoric production site for shell fishhooks excavated on the most remote island, San Nicolas Island, has provided a rare opportunity to examine manufacturing sequences. We have previously employed a multidisciplinary research approach to demonstrate that fishhook production at this site involved using sandstone slabs as abraders, or saws. Here, we use chemical residue analysis, replicative experiments, and microwear patterns to show that fishhook production also involved the use of small pointed pieces of sandstone as reamers. These results bring us one step closer to understanding the complete prehistoric toolkit used for production of circular shell fishhooks.

  • 14.
    Stilborg, Ole
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Pottery craft tradition in transition: From Neolithic central China to Bronze Age northern Sweden2017In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 16, p. 658-664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The diversity of different organic materials and the mixtures of materials used hold rich information on the practical and social relationships between material and human cultures. Regarding pottery, these differences are best examined through the analyses of thin sections. The main focus of this study is the transition and material dialogues that seem to have occurred when a possible ancient Asian pottery tradition reached the Baltics and Scandinavia during the Early Neolithic (from 6500 BP). Two recognisable traits of the Asian tradition are the use of a comb tool to press and scrape the vessel walls during construction and the use of different kinds of organic tempering materials. The oldest examples of this tradition in China date from c. 19,000 BP. Thin sections from three different wares from Latvia, Finland and Sweden were used to analyse the development of the Asian pottery tradition, the repercussions of which are seen as late as the Bronze Age in northern Sweden.

  • 15.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Brorson Schultzén, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Wikström, Anders
    Meshing around: integrating ground-penetrating radar surveys andphotogrammetric documentation for the reconstruction of the spatiallayout of the church of St. Lawrence, Sigtuna, Sweden2016In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 8, p. 295-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims at providing evidence for the usefulness of combining data from both above and below the ground in order to provide a more complete understanding of an archaeological site. For this purpose a Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) survey was carried out next to the standing ruins of the west tower of the church of St. Lawrence in Sigtuna, Sweden. The tower ruins were also documented using photogrammetry providing an accurate 3D-model of the site. The result of the GPR survey clearly images the buried wall foundations of the church but it is only when this data is combined with the photogrammetric 3D-model of the tower ruins that the spatial layout becomes complete. The results clearly provide evidence of the benefits of using such an integrated approach. The available evidence suggests that the tower, nave and choir (with a possible apse) were constructed during the 12th century. During the 15th century the church porch was built and arches added to the nave. The building history of the church is thus rather ordinary compared to other contemporary Swedish churches and, as a consequence, it is likely that that the church was built for the city congregation.

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