Change search
Refine search result
1 - 22 of 22
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Alneberg, Johannes
    et al.
    Sundh, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Bennke, Christin
    Beier, Sara
    Lundin, Daniel
    Hugerth, Luisa W.
    Pinhassi, Jarone
    Kisand, Veljo
    Riemann, Lasse
    Jürgens, Klaus
    Labrenz, Matthias
    Andersson, Anders F.
    BARM and BalticMicrobeDB, a reference metagenome and interface to meta-omic data for the Baltic Sea2018In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 5, article id 180146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Baltic Sea is one of the world's largest brackish water bodies and is characterised by pronounced physicochemical gradients where microbes are the main biogeochemical catalysts. Meta-omic methods provide rich information on the composition of, and activities within, microbial ecosystems, but are computationally heavy to perform. We here present the Baltic Sea Reference Metagenome (BARM), complete with annotated genes to facilitate further studies with much less computational effort. The assembly is constructed using 2.6 billion metagenomic reads from 81 water samples, spanning both spatial and temporal dimensions, and contains 6.8 million genes that have been annotated for function and taxonomy. The assembly is useful as a reference, facilitating taxonomic and functional annotation of additional samples by simply mapping their reads against the assembly. This capability is demonstrated by the successful mapping and annotation of 24 external samples. In addition, we present a public web interface, BalticMicrobeDB, for interactive exploratory analysis of the dataset. [GRAPHICS] .

  • 2. Ammar, Yosr
    et al.
    Faxneld, Suzanne
    Sköld, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Soerensen, Anne L.
    Long-term dataset for contaminants in fish, mussels, and bird eggs from the Baltic Sea2024In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Widespread persistent contaminants are a global environmental problem. In the Baltic Sea, wildlife contamination was first noticed in the 1960s, prompting the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency to establish a comprehensive Swedish National Monitoring Programme for Contaminants in Marine Biota (MCoM) in 1978 run by the Swedish Museum of Natural History. Eight species have been analysed, four fish species (Atlantic herring, Atlantic cod, European perch, viviparous eelpout), one bivalve species (blue mussel), and egg from three bird species (common guillemot, common tern, Eurasian oystercatcher). Here, we present a dataset containing MCoM data from its start until 2021. It includes 36 sets of time-series, each analysed for more than 100 contaminants. The longest time-series is for common guillemot and starts in 1968. We describe the structure of MCoM including historic changes to the number of stations, sample treatment, analytical methods, instruments, and laboratories. The MCoM data is available at the Bolin Centre repository and on GitHub through our R package mcomDb. The latter will be updated yearly with new MCoM records.

  • 3. Buchanan, Erin M.
    et al.
    Jernsäther, Teodor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Kurfalı, Murathan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Nilsonne, Gustav
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Jonas K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
    Primbs, Maximilian A.
    The Psychological Science Accelerator’s COVID-19 rapid-response dataset2023In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 10, article id 87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Psychological Science Accelerator coordinated three large-scale psychological studies to examine the effects of loss-gain framing, cognitive reappraisals, and autonomy framing manipulations on behavioral intentions and affective measures. The data collected (April to October 2020) included specific measures for each experimental study, a general questionnaire examining health prevention behaviors and COVID-19 experience, geographical and cultural context characterization, and demographic information for each participant. Each participant started the study with the same general questions and then was randomized to complete either one longer experiment or two shorter experiments. Data were provided by 73,223 participants with varying completion rates. Participants completed the survey from 111 geopolitical regions in 44 unique languages/dialects. The anonymized dataset described here is provided in both raw and processed formats to facilitate re-use and further analyses. The dataset offers secondary analytic opportunities to explore coping, framing, and self-determination across a diverse, global sample obtained at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, which can be merged with other time-sampled or geographic data. 

  • 4. Buck, Moritz
    et al.
    Garcia, Sarahi L.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Fernandez, Leyden
    Martin, Gaëtan
    Martinez-Rodriguez, Gustavo
    Saarenheimo, Jatta
    Zopfi, Jakob
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Peura, Sari
    Comprehensive dataset of shotgun metagenomes from oxygen stratified freshwater lakes and ponds2021In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stratified lakes and ponds featuring steep oxygen gradients are significant net sources of greenhouse gases and hotspots in the carbon cycle. Despite their significant biogeochemical roles, the microbial communities, especially in the oxygen depleted compartments, are poorly known. Here, we present a comprehensive dataset including 267 shotgun metagenomes from 41 stratified lakes and ponds mainly located in the boreal and subarctic regions, but also including one tropical reservoir and one temperate lake. For most lakes and ponds, the data includes a vertical sample set spanning from the oxic surface to the anoxic bottom layer. The majority of the samples were collected during the open water period, but also a total of 29 samples were collected from under the ice. In addition to the metagenomic sequences, the dataset includes environmental variables for the samples, such as oxygen, nutrient and organic carbon concentrations. The dataset is ideal for further exploring the microbial taxonomic and functional diversity in freshwater environments and potential climate change impacts on the functioning of these ecosystems.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Burgos, María A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Andrews, Elisabeth
    Titos, Gloria
    Alados-Arboledas, Lucas
    Baltensperger, Urs
    Day, Derek
    Jefferson, Anne
    Kalivitis, Nikos
    Mihalopoulos, Nikos
    Sherman, James
    Sun, Junying
    Weingartner, Ernest
    Zieger, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    A global view on the effect of water uptake on aerosol particle light scattering2019In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 6, article id 157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A reference dataset of multi-wavelength particle light scattering and hemispheric backscattering coefficients for different relative humidities (RH) between RH = 30 and 95% and wavelengths between lambda = 450 nm and 700 nm is described in this work. Tandem-humidified nephelometer measurements from 26 ground-based sites around the globe, covering multiple aerosol types, have been re-analysed and harmonized into a single dataset. The dataset includes multi-annual measurements from long-term monitoring sites as well as short-term field campaign data. The result is a unique collection of RH-dependent aerosol light scattering properties, presented as a function of size cut. This dataset is important for climate and atmospheric model-measurement inter-comparisons, as a means to improve model performance, and may be useful for satellite and remote sensing evaluation using surface-based, in-situ measurements.

  • 6. Dorschel, Boris
    et al.
    Hehemann, Laura
    Viquerat, Sacha
    Warnke, Fynn
    Dreutter, Simon
    Schulze Tenberge, Yvonne
    Accettella, Daniela
    An, Lu
    Barrios, Felipe
    Bazhenova, Evgenia
    Black, Jenny
    Bohoyo, Fernando
    Davey, Craig
    De Santis, Laura
    Escutia Dotti, Carlota
    Fremand, Alice C.
    Fretwell, Peter T.
    Gales, Jenny A.
    Gao, Jinyao
    Gasperini, Luca
    Greenbaum, Jamin S.
    Henderson Jencks, Jennifer
    Hogan, Kelly
    Hong, Jong Kuk
    Jakobsson, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Jensen, Laura
    Kool, Johnathan
    Larin, Sergei
    Larter, Robert D.
    Leitchenkov, German
    Loubrieu, Benoit
    Mackay, Kevin
    Mayer, Larry
    Millan, Romain
    Morlighem, Mathieu
    Navidad, Francisco
    Nitsche, Frank O.
    Nogi, Yoshifumi
    Pertuisot, Cecile
    Post, Alexandra L.
    Pritchard, Hamish D.
    Purser, Autun
    Rebesco, Michele
    Rignot, Eric
    Roberts, Jason L.
    Rovere, Marzia
    Ryzhov, Ivan
    Sauli, Chiara
    Schmitt, Thierry
    Silvano, Alessandro
    Smith, Jodie
    Snaith, Helen
    Tate, Alex J.
    Tinto, Kirsty
    Vandenbossche, Philippe
    Weatherall, Pauline
    Wintersteller, Paul
    Yang, Chunguo
    Zhang, Tao
    Arndt, Jan Erik
    The International Bathymetric Chart of the Southern Ocean Version 22022In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Southern Ocean surrounding Antarctica is a region that is key to a range of climatic and oceanographic processes with worldwide effects, and is characterised by high biological productivity and biodiversity. Since 2013, the International Bathymetric Chart of the Southern Ocean (IBCSO) has represented the most comprehensive compilation of bathymetry for the Southern Ocean south of 60 degrees S. Recently, the IBCSO Project has combined its efforts with the Nippon Foundation - GEBCO Seabed 2030 Project supporting the goal of mapping the world's oceans by 2030. New datasets initiated a second version of IBCSO (IBCSO v2). This version extends to 50 degrees S (covering approximately 2.4 times the area of seafloor of the previous version) including the gateways of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the Antarctic circumpolar frontal systems. Due to increased (multibeam) data coverage, IBCSO v2 significantly improves the overall representation of the Southern Ocean seafloor and resolves many submarine landforms in more detail. This makes IBCSO v2 the most authoritative seafloor map of the area south of 50 degrees S.

  • 7.
    Fitzpatrick, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Kahrl, Ariel F.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Snook, Rhonda R.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    SpermTree, a species-level database of sperm morphology spanning the animal tree of life2022In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sperm are the most morphologically variable cell type known, despite performing the same functional role of fertilizing eggs across all sexually reproducing species. Sperm morphology commonly varies among individuals, populations, closely related species, and across animal phyla. Sperm morphology has long been used as a tool for placing species in a phylogenetic context and a range of selective forces are hypothesized to influence sperm evolution and diversification. However, we currently lack robust examinations of macroevolutionary (i.e. across phyla) patterns of sperm evolution, due largely to the challenges of comparing sperm morphological data across the animal tree of life. Here we describe the SpermTree database, which currently represents 5,675 morphological descriptions of sperm morphology from 4,705 unique species from 27 animal phyla. This dataset includes measurements of sperm head, midpiece, flagellum and total length, the latter of which spans four orders of magnitude. All entries in the dataset are matched to currently accepted scientific names in taxonomic databases, facilitating the use of these data in analyses examining sperm evolution in animals.

  • 8.
    Gnacek, Michal
    et al.
    Bournemouth University, UK; Emteq Labs, UK.
    Velez Quintero, Luis Eduardo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Mavridou, Ifigeneia
    Emteq Labs, UK.
    Balaguer-Ballester, Emili
    Bournemouth University, UK.
    Kostoulas, Theodoros
    University of the Aegean, Greece.
    Nduka, Charles
    Emteq Labs, UK.
    Seiss, Ellen
    Bournemouth University, UK.
    AVDOS-VR: Affective Video Database with Physiological Signals and Continuous Ratings Collected Remotely in VR2024In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 11, article id 132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Investigating emotions relies on pre-validated stimuli to evaluate induced responses through subjective self-ratings and physiological changes. The creation of precise affect models necessitates extensive datasets. While datasets related to pictures, words, and sounds are abundant, those associated with videos are comparatively scarce. To overcome this challenge, we present the first virtual reality (VR) database with continuous self-ratings and physiological measures, including facial EMG. Videos were rated online using a head-mounted VR device (HMD) with attached emteqPRO mask and a cinema VR environment in remote home and laboratory settings with minimal setup requirements. This led to an affective video database with continuous valence and arousal self-rating measures and physiological responses (PPG, facial-EMG (7x), IMU). The AVDOS-VR database includes data from 37 participants who watched 30 randomly ordered videos (10 positive, neutral, and negative). Each 30-second video was assessed with two-minute relaxation between categories. Validation results suggest that remote data collection is ecologically valid, providing an effective strategy for future affective study designs. All data can be accessed via: www.gnacek.com/affective-video-database-online-study.

  • 9. Haytural, Hazal
    et al.
    Benfeitas, Rui
    Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Schedin-Weiss, Sophia
    Bereczki, Erika
    Rezeli, Melinda
    Unwin, Richard D.
    Wang, Xusheng
    Dammer, Eric B.
    Johnson, Erik C. B.
    Seyfried, Nicholas T.
    Winblad, Bengt
    Tijms, Betty M.
    Visser, Pieter Jelle
    Frykman, Susanne
    Tjernberg, Lars O.
    Insights into the changes in the proteome of Alzheimer disease elucidated by a meta-analysis2021In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics is a powerful tool to explore pathogenic changes of a disease in an unbiased manner and has been used extensively in Alzheimer disease (AD) research. Here, by performing a meta-analysis of high-quality proteomic studies, we address which pathological changes are observed consistently and therefore most likely are of great importance for AD pathogenesis. We retrieved datasets, comprising a total of 21,588 distinct proteins identified across 857 postmortem human samples, from ten studies using labeled or label-free MS approaches. Our meta-analysis findings showed significant alterations of 757 and 1,195 proteins in AD in the labeled and label-free datasets, respectively. Only 33 proteins, some of which were associated with synaptic signaling, had the same directional change across the individual studies. However, despite alterations in individual proteins being different between the labeled and the label-free datasets, several pathways related to synaptic signaling, oxidative phosphorylation, immune response and extracellular matrix were commonly dysregulated in AD. These pathways represent robust changes in the human AD brain and warrant further investigation.

  • 10.
    Jakobsson, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Mayer, Larry A.
    Bringensparr, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Castro, Carlos F.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Mohammad, Rezwan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Johnson, Paul
    Ketter, Tomer
    Accettella, Daniela
    Amblas, David
    An, Lu
    Arndt, Jan Erik
    Canals, Miquel
    Casamor, Jose Luis
    Chauche, Nolwenn
    Coakley, Bernard
    Danielson, Seth
    Demarte, Maurizio
    Dickson, Mary-Lynn
    Dorschel, Boris
    Dowdeswell, Julian A.
    Dreutter, Simon
    Fremand, Alice C.
    Gallant, Dana
    Hall, John K.
    Hehemann, Laura
    Hodnesdal, Hanne
    Hong, Jongkuk
    Ivaldi, Roberta
    Kane, Emily
    Klaucke, Ingo
    Krawczyk, Diana W.
    Kristoffersen, Yngve
    Kuipers, Boele R.
    Millan, Romain
    Masetti, Giuseppe
    Morlighem, Mathieu
    Noormets, Riko
    Prescott, Megan M.
    Rebesco, Michele
    Rignot, Eric
    Semiletov, Igor
    Tate, Alex J.
    Travaglini, Paola
    Velicogna, Isabella
    Weatherall, Pauline
    Weinrebe, Wilhelm
    Willis, Joshua K.
    Wood, Michael
    Zarayskaya, Yulia
    Zhang, Tao
    Zimmermann, Mark
    Zinglersen, Karl B.
    The International Bathymetric Chart of the Arctic Ocean Version 4.02020In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bathymetry (seafloor depth), is a critical parameter providing the geospatial context for a multitude of marine scientific studies. Since 1997, the International Bathymetric Chart of the Arctic Ocean (IBCAO) has been the authoritative source of bathymetry for the Arctic Ocean. IBCAO has merged its efforts with the Nippon Foundation-GEBCO-Seabed 2030 Project, with the goal of mapping all of the oceans by 2030. Here we present the latest version (IBCAO Ver. 4.0), with more than twice the resolution (200 x 200m versus 500 x 500m) and with individual depth soundings constraining three times more area of the Arctic Ocean (similar to 19.8% versus 6.7%), than the previous IBCAO Ver. 3.0 released in 2012. Modern multibeam bathymetry comprises similar to 14.3% in Ver. 4.0 compared to similar to 5.4% in Ver. 3.0. Thus, the new IBCAO Ver. 4.0 has substantially more seafloor morphological information that offers new insights into a range of submarine features and processes; for example, the improved portrayal of Greenland fjords better serves predictive modelling of the fate of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Machine-accessible metadata file describing the reported data: 10.6084/m9.figshare.12369314

  • 11. Kaufman, Darrell
    et al.
    McKay, Nicholas
    Routson, Cody
    Erb, Michael
    Davis, Basil
    Heiri, Oliver
    Jaccard, Samuel
    Tierney, Jessica
    Datwyler, Christoph
    Axford, Yarrow
    Brussel, Thomas
    Cartapanis, Olivier
    Chase, Brian
    Dawson, Andria
    de Vernal, Anne
    Engels, Stefan
    Jonkers, Lukas
    Marsicek, Jeremiah
    Moffa-Sanchez, Paola
    Morrill, Carrie
    Orsi, Anais
    Rehfeld, Kira
    Saunders, Krystyna
    Sommer, Philipp S.
    Thomas, Elizabeth
    Tonello, Marcela
    Toth, Monika
    Vachula, Richard
    Andreev, Andrei
    Bertrand, Sebastien
    Biskaborn, Boris
    Bringue, Manuel
    Brooks, Stephen
    Caniupan, Magaly
    Chevalier, Manuel
    Cwynar, Les
    Emile-Geay, Julien
    Fegyveresi, John
    Feurdean, Angelica
    Finsinger, Walter
    Fortin, Marie-Claude
    Foster, Louise
    Fox, Mathew
    Gajewski, Konrad
    Grosjean, Martin
    Hausmann, Sonja
    Heinrichs, Markus
    Holmes, Naomi
    Ilyashuk, Boris
    Ilyashuk, Elena
    Juggins, Steve
    Khider, Deborah
    Koinig, Karin
    Langdon, Peter
    Larocque-Tobler, Isabelle
    Li, Jianyong
    Lotter, Andre
    Luoto, Tomi
    Mackay, Anson
    Magyari, Eniko
    Malevich, Steven
    Mark, Bryan
    Massaferro, Julieta
    Montade, Vincent
    Nazarova, Larisa
    Novenko, Elena
    Paril, Petr
    Pearson, Emma
    Peros, Matthew
    Pienitz, Reinhard
    Plociennik, Mateusz
    Porinchu, David
    Potito, Aaron
    Rees, Andrew
    Reinemann, Scott
    Roberts, Stephen
    Rolland, Nicolas
    Salonen, Sakari
    Self, Angela
    Seppa, Heikki
    Shala, Shyhrete
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    St-Jacques, Jeannine-Marie
    Stenni, Barbara
    Syrykh, Liudmila
    Tarrats, Pol
    Taylor, Karen
    van den Bos, Valerie
    Velle, Gaute
    Wahl, Eugene
    Walker, Ian
    Wilmshurst, Janet
    Zhang, Enlou
    Zhilich, Snezhana
    A global database of Holocene paleotemperature records2020In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A comprehensive database of paleoclimate records is needed to place recent warming into the longer-term context of natural climate variability. We present a global compilation of quality-controlled, published, temperature-sensitive proxy records extending back 12,000 years through the Holocene. Data were compiled from 679 sites where time series cover at least 4000 years, are resolved at sub-millennial scale (median spacing of 400 years or finer) and have at least one age control point every 3000 years, with cut-off values slackened in data-sparse regions. The data derive from lake sediment (51%), marine sediment (31%), peat (11%), glacier ice (3%), and other natural archives. The database contains 1319 records, including 157 from the Southern Hemisphere. The multi-proxy database comprises paleotemperature time series based on ecological assemblages, as well as biophysical and geochemical indicators that reflect mean annual or seasonal temperatures, as encoded in the database. This database can be used to reconstruct the spatiotemporal evolution of Holocene temperature at global to regional scales, and is publicly available in Linked Paleo Data (LiPD) format.

  • 12. Kurowska, Anna
    et al.
    Barardehi, Ilyar Heydari
    Fuller, Sylvia
    Petts, Richard J.
    Kaufman, Gayle
    Doucet, Andrea
    Engeman, Cassandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Matysiak, Anna
    Guetto, Raffaele
    Reimer, Thordis
    Kasegn, Tsegachew Degu
    Vignoli, Daniele
    Duvander, Ann-Zofie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Gabel, Shirely Gatenio
    Familydemic Cross Country and Gender Dataset on work and family outcomes during COVID-19 pandemic2023In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 10, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we present the Familydemic Cross Country and Gender Dataset (FCCGD), which offers cross country and gender comparative data on work and family outcomes among parents of dependent children, before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. It covers six countries from two continents representing diverse welfare regimes as well as distinct policy reactions to the pandemic outbreak. The FCCGD was created using the first wave of a web-based international survey (Familydemic) carried out between June and September 2021, on large samples of parents (aged 20–59) living with at least one child under 12 in Canada, Germany, Italy, Poland, Sweden, and the US. While individual datasets are not available due to country-level restriction policies, the presented database allows for cross-country comparison of a wide range of employment outcomes and work arrangements, the division of diverse tasks of unpaid labour (housework and childcare) in couples, experiences with childcare and school closures due to the pandemic and subjective assessments of changes to work-life balance, career prospects and the financial situation of families (234 variables).

  • 13. Mukwaya, Anthony
    et al.
    Lindvall, Jessica M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Xeroudaki, Maria
    Peebo, Beatrice
    Ali, Zaheer
    Lennikov, Anton
    Dahl Ejby Jensen, Lasse
    Lagali, Neil
    A microarray whole-genome gene expression dataset in a rat model of inflammatory corneal angiogenesis2016In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 3, article id 160103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In angiogenesis with concurrent inflammation, many pathways are activated, some linked to VEGF and others largely VEGF-independent. Pathways involving inflammatory mediators, chemokines, and micro-RNAs may play important roles in maintaining a pro-angiogenic environment or mediating angiogenic regression. Here, we describe a gene expression dataset to facilitate exploration of pro-angiogenic, pro-inflammatory, and remodelling/normalization-associated genes during both an active capillary sprouting phase, and in the restoration of an avascular phenotype. The dataset was generated by microarray analysis of the whole transcriptome in a rat model of suture-induced inflammatory corneal neovascularisation. Regions of active capillary sprout growth or regression in the cornea were harvested and total RNA extracted from four biological replicates per group. High quality RNA was obtained for gene expression analysis using microarrays. Fold change of selected genes was validated by qPCR, and protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. We provide a gene expression dataset that may be re-used to investigate corneal neovascularisation, and may also have implications in other contexts of inflammation-mediated angiogenesis.

  • 14. Pick, Cari. M.
    et al.
    Hansson, Lina S.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute.
    Lasselin, Julie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute.
    Varnum, Michael E. W.
    Publisher Correction: Fundamental social motives measured across forty-two cultures in two waves (Scientific Data, (2022), 9, 1, (499), 10.1038/s41597-022-01579-w)2022In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the html version of this article the affiliation details for Marco Antonio Correa Varella were incorrectly given as ‘eduLab21, Ayrton Senna Institute, São Paulo, 05423-040, Brazil’, but should have been ‘Department of Experimental Psychology, Institute of Psychology, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, 05508-030, Brazil’. This has now been corrected in the HTML version of the Article. The PDF version of the Article was correct at the time of publication. 

  • 15. Pick, Cari M.
    et al.
    Ko, Ahra
    Kenrick, Douglas T.
    Wiezel, Adi
    Wormley, Alexandra S.
    Awad, Edmond
    Al-Shawaf, Laith
    Barry, Oumar
    Bereby-Meyer, Yoella
    Boonyasiriwat, Watcharaporn
    Brandstätter, Eduard
    Ceylan-Batur, Suzan
    Choy, Bryan K. C.
    Crispim, Ana Carla
    Cruz, Julio Eduardo
    David, Daniel
    David, Oana A.
    Defelipe, Renata Pereira
    Elmas, Pinar
    Espinosa, Agustín
    Fernandez, Ana Maria
    Fetvadjiev, Velichko H.
    Fetvadjieva, Stefka
    Fischer, Ronald
    Galdi, Silvia
    Galindo-Caballero, Oscar Javier
    Golovina, Elena V.
    Golovina, Galina M.
    Gomez-Jacinto, Luis
    Graf, Sylvie
    Grossmann, Igor
    Gul, Pelin
    Halama, Peter
    Hamamura, Takeshi
    Han, Shihui
    Hansson, Lina S.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Sweden.
    Hitokoto, Hidefumi
    Hřebíčková, Martina
    Ilic, Darinka
    Johnson, Jennifer Lee
    Kara-Yakoubian, Mane
    Karl, Johannes A.
    Kim, Jinseok P.
    Kohút, Michal
    Lasselin, Julie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Sweden.
    Lee, Hwaryung
    Li, Norman P.
    Mafra, Anthonieta Looman
    Malanchuk, Oksana
    Moran, Simone
    Murata, Asuka
    Na, Jinkyung
    Ndiaye, Serigne Abdou Lahat
    O, Jiaqing
    Onyishi, Ike E.
    Pasay-an, Eddieson
    Rizwan, Muhammed
    Roth, Eric
    Salgado, Sergio
    Samoylenko, Elena S.
    Savchenko, Tatyana N.
    Sette, Catarina
    Sevincer, A. Timur
    Skoog, Eric
    Stanciu, Adrian
    Suh, Eunkook M.
    Sznycer, Daniel
    Talhelm, Thomas
    Ugwu, Fabian O.
    Uskul, Ayse K.
    Uz, Irem
    Valentova, Jaroslava Varella
    Varella, Marco Antonio Correa
    Wei, Liuqing
    Zambrano, Danilo
    Varnum, Michael E. W.
    Fundamental social motives measured across forty-two cultures in two waves2022In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 9, article id 499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How does psychology vary across human societies? The fundamental social motives framework adopts an evolutionary approach to capture the broad range of human social goals within a taxonomy of ancestrally recurring threats and opportunities. These motives—self-protection, disease avoidance, affiliation, status, mate acquisition, mate retention, and kin care—are high in fitness relevance and everyday salience, yet understudied cross-culturally. Here, we gathered data on these motives in 42 countries (N = 15,915) in two cross-sectional waves, including 19 countries (N = 10,907) for which data were gathered in both waves. Wave 1 was collected from mid-2016 through late 2019 (32 countries, N = 8,998; 3,302 male, 5,585 female; Mage = 24.43, SD = 7.91). Wave 2 was collected from April through November 2020, during the COVID-19 pandemic (29 countries, N = 6,917; 2,249 male, 4,218 female; Mage = 28.59, SD = 11.31). These data can be used to assess differences and similarities in people’s fundamental social motives both across and within cultures, at different time points, and in relation to other commonly studied cultural indicators and outcomes. 

  • 16.
    Rodríguez-Gijón, Alejandro
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Hampel, Justyna J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Dharamshi, Jennah
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Garcia, Sarahi L.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). University of Oldenburg, Germany.
    Shotgun metagenomes from productive lakes in an urban region of Sweden2023In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 10, article id 810Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban lakes provide multiple benefits to society while influencing life quality. Moreover, lakes and their microbiomes are sentinels of anthropogenic impact and can be used for natural resource management and planning. Here, we release original metagenomic data from several well-characterized and anthropogenically impacted eutrophic lakes in the vicinity of Stockholm (Sweden). Our goal was to collect representative microbial community samples and use shotgun sequencing to provide a broad view on microbial diversity of productive urban lakes. Our dataset has an emphasis on Lake Mälaren as a major drinking water reservoir under anthropogenic impact. This dataset includes short-read sequence data and metagenome assemblies from each of 17 samples collected from eutrophic lakes near the greater Stockholm area. We used genome-resolved metagenomics and obtained 2378 metagenome assembled genomes that de-replicated into 514 species representative genomes. This dataset adds new datapoints to previously sequenced lakes and it includes the first sequenced set of metagenomes from Lake Mälaren. Our dataset serves as a baseline for future monitoring of drinking water reservoirs and urban lakes.

  • 17.
    Roquet, Fabien
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology .
    Williams, Guy
    Hindell, Mark A.
    Harcourt, Rob
    McMahon, Clive
    Guinet, Christophe
    Charrassin, Jean-Benoit
    Reverdin, Gilles
    Boehme, Lars
    Lovell, Phil
    Fedak, Mike
    A Southern Indian Ocean database of hydrographic profiles obtained with instrumented elephant seals2014In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 1, article id 140028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The instrumentation of southern elephant seals with satellite-linked CTD tags has offered unique temporal and spatial coverage of the Southern Indian Ocean since 2004. This includes extensive data from the Antarctic continental slope and shelf regions during the winter months, which is outside the conventional areas of Argo autonomous floats and ship-based studies. This landmark dataset of around 75,000 temperature and salinity profiles from 20–140 °E, concentrated on the sector between the Kerguelen Islands and Prydz Bay, continues to grow through the coordinated efforts of French and Australian marine research teams. The seal data are quality controlled and calibrated using delayed-mode techniques involving comparisons with other existing profiles as well as cross-comparisons similar to established protocols within the Argo community, with a resulting accuracy of ±0.03 °C in temperature and ±0.05 in salinity or better. The data offer invaluable new insights into the water masses, oceanographic processes and provides a vital tool for oceanographers seeking to advance our understanding of this key component of the global ocean climate.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18.
    Rosvold, Elisabeth L.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations. Peace Research Institute Oslo, Norway.
    Buhaug, Halvard
    GDIS, a global dataset of geocoded disaster locations2021In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a new open source extension to the Emergency Events Database (EM-DAT) that allows researchers, for the first time, to explore and make use of subnational, geocoded data on major disasters triggered by natural hazards. The Geocoded Disasters (GDIS) dataset provides spatial geometry in the form of GIS polygons and centroid latitude and longitude coordinates for each administrative entity listed as a disaster location in the EM-DAT database. In total, GDIS contains spatial information on 39,953 locations for 9,924 unique disasters occurring worldwide between 1960 and 2018. The dataset facilitates connecting the EM-DAT database to other geographic data sources on the subnational level to enable rigorous empirical analyses of disaster determinants and impacts.

    Download full text (pdf)
    RosvoldBuhaug2021
  • 19. Rzymski, Christoph
    et al.
    Tresoldi, Tiago
    Greenhill, Simon J.
    Wu, Mei-Shin
    Schweikhard, Nathanael E.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Gast, Volker
    Bodt, Timotheus A.
    Hantgan, Abbie
    Kaiping, Gereon A.
    Chang, Sophie
    Lai, Yunfan
    Morozova, Natalia
    Arjava, Heini
    Hübler, Nataliia
    Koile, Ezequiel
    Pepper, Steve
    Proos, Mariann
    Van Epps, Briana
    Blanco, Ingrid
    Hundt, Carolin
    Monakhov, Sergei
    Pianykh, Kristina
    Ramesh, Sallona
    Gray, Russell D.
    Forkel, Robert
    List, Johann-Mattis
    The Database of Cross-Linguistic Colexifications, reproducible analysis of cross-linguistic polysemies2020In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advances in computer-assisted linguistic research have been greatly influential in reshaping linguistic research. With the increasing availability of interconnected datasets created and curated by researchers, more and more interwoven questions can now be investigated. Such advances, however, are bringing high requirements in terms of rigorousness for preparing and curating datasets. Here we present CLICS, a Database of Cross-Linguistic Colexifications (CLICS). CLICS tackles interconnected interdisciplinary research questions about the colexification of words across semantic categories in the world's languages, and show-cases best practices for preparing data for cross-linguistic research. This is done by addressing shortcomings of an earlier version of the database, CLICS2, and by supplying an updated version with CLICS3, which massively increases the size and scope of the project. We provide tools and guidelines for this purpose and discuss insights resulting from organizing student tasks for database updates.

  • 20. Schoffelen, Jan-Mathijs
    et al.
    Oostenveld, Robert
    Lam, Nietzsche H. L.
    Uddén, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Radboud University, The Netherlands; Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, The Netherlands; Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study, Sweden.
    Hultén, Annika
    Hagoort, Peter
    A 204-subject multimodal neuroimaging dataset to study language processing2019In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 6, article id 17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This dataset, colloquially known as the Mother Of Unification Studies (MOUS) dataset, contains multimodal neuroimaging data that has been acquired from 204 healthy human subjects. The neuroimaging protocol consisted of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to derive information at high spatial resolution about brain anatomy and structural connections, and functional data during task, and at rest. In addition, magnetoencephalography (MEG) was used to obtain high temporal resolution electrophysiological measurements during task, and at rest. All subjects performed a language task, during which they processed linguistic utterances that either consisted of normal or scrambled sentences. Half of the subjects were reading the stimuli, the other half listened to the stimuli. The resting state measurements consisted of 5 minutes eyes-open for the MEG and 7 minutes eyes-closed for fMRI. The neuroimaging data, as well as the information about the experimental events are shared according to the Brain Imaging Data Structure (BIDS) format. This unprecedented neuroimaging language data collection allows for the investigation of various aspects of the neurobiological correlates of language.

  • 21.
    Thorslund, Josefin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
    van Vliet, Michelle T. H.
    A global dataset of surface water and groundwater salinity measurements from 1980-20192020In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Salinization of freshwater resources is a growing water quality challenge, which may negatively impact both sectoral water-use and food security, as well as biodiversity and ecosystem services. Although monitoring of salinity is relatively common compared to many other water quality parameters, no compilation and harmonisation of available datasets for both surface and groundwater components have been made yet at the global scale. Here, we present a new global salinity database, compiled from electrical conductivity (EC) monitoring data of both surface water (rivers, lakes/reservoirs) and groundwater locations over the period 1980-2019. The data were assembled from a range of sources, including local to global salinity databases, governmental organizations, river basin management commissions and water development boards. Our resulting database comprises more than 16.3 million measurements from 45,103 surface water locations and 208,550 groundwater locations around the world. This database could provide new opportunities for meta-analyses of salinity levels of water resources, as well as for addressing data and model-driven questions related to historic and future salinization patterns and impacts.

  • 22. Vandvik, Vigdis
    et al.
    Halbritter, Aud H.
    Althuizen, Inge H. J.
    Christiansen, Casper T.
    Henn, Jonathan J.
    Jonsdottir, Ingibjorg Svala
    Klanderud, Kari
    Macias-Fauria, Marc
    Malhi, Yadvinder
    Maitner, Brian Salvin
    Michaletz, Sean
    Roos, Ruben E.
    Telford, Richard J.
    Bass, Polly
    Bjornsdottir, Katrin
    Bustamante, Lucely Lucero Vilca
    Chmurzynski, Adam
    Chen, Shuli
    Haugum, Siri Vatso
    Kemppinen, Julia
    Lepley, Kai
    Li, Yaoqi
    Linabury, Mary
    Matos, Ilaine Silveira
    Neto-Bradley, Barbara M.
    Ng, Molly
    Niittynen, Pekka
    Ostman, Silje
    Pankova, Karolina
    Roth, Nina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Bolin Centre for Climate Research (together with KTH & SMHI).
    Castorena, Matiss
    Spiegel, Marcus
    Thomson, Eleanor
    Vagenes, Alexander Saele
    Enquist, Brian J.
    Plant traits and associated data from a warming experiment, a seabird colony, and along elevation in Svalbard2023In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Arctic is warming at a rate four times the global average, while also being exposed to other global environmental changes, resulting in widespread vegetation and ecosystem change. Integrating functional trait-based approaches with multi-level vegetation, ecosystem, and landscape data enables a holistic understanding of the drivers and consequences of these changes. In two High Arctic study systems near Longyearbyen, Svalbard, a 20-year ITEX warming experiment and elevational gradients with and without nutrient input from nesting seabirds, we collected data on vegetation composition and structure, plant functional traits, ecosystem fluxes, multispectral remote sensing, and microclimate. The dataset contains 1,962 plant records and 16,160 trait measurements from 34 vascular plant taxa, for 9 of which these are the first published trait data. By integrating these comprehensive data, we bridge knowledge gaps and expand trait data coverage, including on intraspecific trait variation. These data can offer insights into ecosystem functioning and provide baselines to assess climate and environmental change impacts. Such knowledge is crucial for effective conservation and management in these vulnerable regions.

1 - 22 of 22
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf