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  • 1.
    Bahati, Bernard
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. University of Rwanda, Rwanda.
    Fors, Uno
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tedre, Matti
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Can Student Engagement in Online Courses Predict Performance on Online Knowledge Surveys?2017In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 73-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The link between student engagement and academic performance has been widely examined. However, most of these studies have focused on ascertaining the existence of such a relationship on the summative assessment level. By comparing students’ experience points in an online course and students’ scores on online knowledge surveys (KS), this study examined the relationship between student engagement and performance on online KS on the formative assessment level. Knowledge surveys were developed and formatively administered in four sections of an online Integration of ICT in Education course. Using Moodle Feedback Module, knowledge surveys were designed based on three key elements: learning objectives, the course content, and the revised Bloom’s Taxonomy of learning objectives. Using rated multiple choice KS questions, the correlation between students’ scores on KSs and students’ experience points was calculated using SPSS. The results show that students’ confidence levels in ability to answer KS questions increased in some of the course sections and decreased in others.  The student engagement in online course was positively—but weakly—related to student performance on online KS and the strength of this relationship increased as the course unfolded. Our conclusion is that student engagement in online courses would not be an accurate predictor of student performance on online Knowledge surveys right at the beginning of an instructional process.

  • 2.
    Colombage, Ranil Peiris
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Männikkö Barbutiu, Sirkku
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hansson, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    About the challenges in undergraduate research projects: an explorative case study in a Sri Lankan National University2018In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 25-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conducting research and writing a thesis about it is regarded as a distinctive pedagogy (learning through inquiry) within higher education which brings new challenges to all parties involved. To complete a thesis, students should select a problem, make a systematic plan, implement the plan and, finally, write a report of the process and findings. Students do have a supervisor to guide and support them, but it is the student who plays the key role in the whole research process. The present study is a qualitative, explorative case study to understand the challenges related to research projects within undergraduate management degree programmes in a Sri Lankan national University. Data have been collected using interviews and focus group discussions in six-degree programmes, with around 40 participants in total. The study focuses on identifying problematic areas and creating a general picture of why students’ research projects are not progressing favourably. Six main challenges were identified: student motivation, student-supervisor relationships, skills and knowledge, students’ workload, the structure of the research project course, and resources and ICT tools. These problematic areas are complex and multidimensional. Therefore, further studies are required to truly understand the complex interrelatedness of these areas.

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