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  • 1.
    Hansson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Artist’s Salary Now!2019In: PARSE Journal, E-ISSN 2002-0953, no 9Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Hansson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. The Royal Institute of Art, Sweden .
    The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life Online: Between Alienation and Belonging2017In: PARSE Journal, E-ISSN 2002-0953, no 5, p. 47-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When considering how relations are handled in social media applications, these technologies can further alienate people as their relations become commodified, but they can also bring about the possibility of reducing alienation in certain areas by connecting multiple intersecting self-managed networks of people. This “Multitude” has led Marxist scholars to claim that the network-based creative economy can be seen as a form of communism.

    The purpose with this article is to explore how a process of alienation and disalienation takes place in practice, taking young artists’ online communication as a case, drawing from comprehensive sources on the internet such as blogs, web pages, networking sites and digital magazines, as well as interview data. The results shows different strategies for handling the tension between communication technologies used as tools to strengthen relations and destabilise hegemonic identities, or as a tool that commodify relations, enabling self-exploitation and user surveillance. The article contributes to critical internet studies by conceptualising Marx’s theory of alienation into a framework for describing communication practices as relational modes of production; from using communication technologies for becoming visible and accessible on an open market, to performing a trustworthy persona online, to using it for maintaining bonds with a community.

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