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  • 1.
    Alexander, Steven M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Maryland, USA; University of Waterloo, Canada.
    Jones, Kristal
    Bennett, Nathan J.
    Budden, Amber
    Cox, Michael
    Crosas, Merce
    Game, Edward T.
    Geary, Janis
    Hardy, R. Dean
    Johnson, Jay T.
    Karcher, Sebastian
    Motzer, Nicole
    Pittman, Jeremy
    Randell, Heather
    Silva, Julie A.
    Da Silva, Patricia Pinto
    Strasser, Carly
    Strawhacker, Colleen
    Stuhl, Andrew
    Weber, Nic
    Qualitative data sharing and synthesis for sustainability science2020In: Nature Sustainability, E-ISSN 2398-9629, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 81-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Opportunities, challenges and recommended targeted actions to accelerate qualitative data sharing to address complex socio-environmental problems Socio-environmental synthesis as a research approach contributes to broader sustainability policy and practice by reusing data from disparate disciplines in innovative ways. Synthesizing diverse data sources and types of evidence can help to better conceptualize, investigate and address increasingly complex socio-environmental problems. However, sharing qualitative data for re-use remains uncommon when compared to sharing quantitative data. We argue that qualitative data present untapped opportunities for sustainability science, and discuss practical pathways to facilitate and realize the benefits from sharing and reusing qualitative data. However, these opportunities and benefits are also hindered by practical, ethical and epistemological challenges. To address these challenges and accelerate qualitative data sharing, we outline enabling conditions and suggest actions for researchers, institutions, funders, data repository managers and publishers.

  • 2. Gerten, Dieter
    et al.
    Heck, Vera
    Jägermeyr, Jonas
    Bodirsky, Benjamin Leon
    Fetzer, Ingo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Jalava, Mika
    Kummu, Matti
    Lucht, Wolfgang
    Rockström, Johan
    Schaphoff, Sibyll
    Schellnhuber, Hans Joachim
    Feeding ten billion people is possible within four terrestrial planetary boundaries2020In: Nature Sustainability, E-ISSN 2398-9629Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global agriculture puts heavy pressure on planetary boundaries, posing the challenge to achieve future food security without compromising Earth system resilience. On the basis of process-detailed, spatially explicit representation of four interlinked planetary boundaries (biosphere integrity, land-system change, freshwater use, nitrogen flows) and agricultural systems in an internally consistent model framework, we here show that almost half of current global food production depends on planetary boundary transgressions. Hotspot regions, mainly in Asia, even face simultaneous transgression of multiple underlying local boundaries. If these boundaries were strictly respected, the present food system could provide a balanced diet (2,355 kcal per capita per day) for 3.4 billion people only. However, as we also demonstrate, transformation towards more sustainable production and consumption patterns could support 10.2 billion people within the planetary boundaries analysed. Key prerequisites are spatially redistributed cropland, improved water-nutrient management, food waste reduction and dietary changes. Agriculture transforms the Earth and risks crossing thresholds for a healthy planet. This study finds almost half of current food production crosses such boundaries, as for freshwater use, but that transformation towards more sustainable production and consumption could support 10.2 billion people.

  • 3.
    Lade, Steven J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Australian National University, Australia.
    Steffen, Will
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Australian National University, Australia.
    De Vries, Wim
    Carpenter, Stephen R.
    Donges, Jonathan F.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Germany.
    Gerten, Dieter
    Hoff, Holger
    Newbold, Tim
    Richardson, Katherine
    Rockström, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Germany.
    Human impacts on planetary boundaries amplified by Earth system interactions2020In: Nature Sustainability, E-ISSN 2398-9629, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 119-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The planetary boundary framework presents a 'planetary dashboard' of humanity's globally aggregated performance on a set of environmental issues that endanger the Earth system's capacity to support humanity. While this framework has been highly influential, a critical shortcoming for its application in sustainability governance is that it currently fails to represent how impacts related to one of the planetary boundaries affect the status of other planetary boundaries. Here, we surveyed and provisionally quantified interactions between the Earth system processes represented by the planetary boundaries and investigated their consequences for sustainability governance. We identified a dense network of interactions between the planetary boundaries. The resulting cascades and feedbacks predominantly amplify human impacts on the Earth system and thereby shrink the safe operating space for future human impacts on the Earth system. Our results show that an integrated understanding of Earth system dynamics is critical to navigating towards a sustainable future. The cascading effects and feedbacks of interactions between planetary boundaries shrink the safe operating space originally identified by analysing each boundary separately.

  • 4. McDonald, Robert I.
    et al.
    Mansur, Andressa V.
    Ascensão, Fernando
    Colbert, M'lisa
    Crossman, Katie
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Gonzalez, Andrew
    Güneralp, Burak
    Haase, Dagmar
    Hamann, Maike
    Hillel, Oliver
    Huang, Kangning
    Kahnt, Belinda
    Maddox, David
    Pacheco, Andrea
    Pereira, Henrique M.
    Seto, Karen C.
    Simkin, Rohan
    Walsh, Brenna
    Werner, Alexandra S.
    Ziter, Carly
    Research gaps in knowledge of the impact of urban growth on biodiversity2020In: Nature Sustainability, E-ISSN 2398-9629, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 16-24Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By 2030, an additional 1.2 billion people are forecast in urban areas globally. We review the scientific literature (n = 922 studies) to assess direct and indirect impacts of urban growth on habitat and biodiversity. Direct impacts are cumulatively substantial, with 290,000 km(2) of natural habitat forecast to be converted to urban land uses between 2000 and 2030. Studies of direct impact are disproportionately from high-income countries. Indirect urban impacts on biodiversity, such as food consumption, affect a greater area than direct impacts, but comparatively few studies (34%) have quantified urban indirect impacts on biodiversity. The world is urbanizing. This Review assesses impacts of urban growth on habitat and biodiversity, finding direct impacts more in high-income countries while indirect impacts affect more land but are lesser studied.

  • 5.
    Norström, Albert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Cvitanovic, Christopher
    Löf, Marie F.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre.
    West, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Australian National University, Australia; Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Wyborn, Carina
    Balvanera, Patricia
    Bednarek, Angela T.
    Bennett, Elena M.
    Biggs, Reinette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    de Bremond, Ariane
    Campbell, Bruce M.
    Canadell, Josep G.
    Carpenter, Stephen R.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Fulton, Elizabeth A.
    Gaffney, Owen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Germany.
    Gelcich, Stefan
    Jouffray, Jean-Baptiste
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Leach, Melissa
    Le Tissier, Martin
    Martin-López, Berta
    Louder, Elena
    Loutre, Marie-France
    Meadow, Alison M.
    Nagendra, Harini
    Payne, Davnah
    Peterson, Garry D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Reyers, Belinda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Scholes, Robert
    Speranza, Chinwe Ifejika
    Spierenburg, Marja
    Stafford-Smith, Mark
    Tengö, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    van der Hel, Sandra
    van Putten, Ingrid
    Österblom, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Principles for knowledge co-production in sustainability research2020In: Nature Sustainability, E-ISSN 2398-9629Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research practice, funding agencies and global science organizations suggest that research aimed at addressing sustainability challenges is most effective when 'co-produced' by academics and non-academics. Co-production promises to address the complex nature of contemporary sustainability challenges better than more traditional scientific approaches. But definitions of knowledge co-production are diverse and often contradictory. We propose a set of four general principles that underlie high-quality knowledge co-production for sustainability research. Using these principles, we offer practical guidance on how to engage in meaningful co-productive practices, and how to evaluate their quality and success. Research addressing sustainability issues is more effective if 'co-produced' by academics and non-academics, but definitions of co-production vary. This Perspective presents four knowledge co-production principles for sustainability research and guides on how to engage in co-productive practices.

  • 6.
    Schill, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Anderies, John M.
    Lindahl, Therese
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Polasky, Stephen
    Cárdenas, Juan Camilo
    Crépin, Anne-Sophie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Janssen, Marco A.
    Norberg, Jon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Schlüter, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    A more dynamic understanding of human behaviour for the Anthropocene2019In: Nature Sustainability, E-ISSN 2398-9629, Vol. 2, no 12, p. 1075-1082Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human behaviour is of profound significance in shaping pathways towards sustainability. Yet, the approach to understanding human behaviour in many fields remains reliant on overly simplistic models. For a better understanding of the interface between human behaviour and sustainability, we take work in behavioural economics and cognitive psychology as a starting point, but argue for an expansion of this work by adopting a more dynamic and systemic understanding of human behaviour, that is, as part of complex adaptive systems. A complex adaptive systems approach allows us to capture behaviour as ''enculturated' and 'enearthed', co-evolving with socio-cultural and biophysical contexts. Connecting human behaviour and context through a complex adaptive systems lens is critical to inform environmental governance and management for sustainability, and ultimately to better understand the dynamics of the Anthropocene itself.

1 - 6 of 6
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