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  • 1.
    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed F.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Arafa, Wael A. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Laine, Tanja M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Shatskiy, Andrey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kärkäs, Markus D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Åkermark, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johnston, Eric V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Substituent Effects in Molecular Ruthenium Water Oxidation Catalysts Based on Amide Ligands2017In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 9, no 9, p. 1583-1587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The production of clean and sustainable energy is considered as one of the most urgent issues for our society. Mastering the oxidation of water to dioxygen is essential for the production of solar fuels. A study of the influence of the substituents on the catalytic activity of a series of mononuclear Ru complexes (2a-e) based on a tetradentate ligand framework is presented. At neutral pH, using [Ru(bpy)(3)](PF6)(3) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) as the terminal oxidant, a good correlation between the turnover frequency (TOF) and the Hammett sigma(meta) parameters was obtained. Additionally, a general pathway for the deactivation of Ru-based catalysts 2a-e during the catalytic oxidation of water through poisoning by carbon monoxide was demonstrated. These results highlight the importance of ligand design for fine-tuning the catalytic activity of water oxidation catalysts.

  • 2. Asahina, Shunsuke
    et al.
    Takami, Seiichi
    Otsuka, Takeshi
    Adschiri, Tadafumi
    Terasaki, Osamu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Exploitation of Surface-Sensitive Electrons in Scanning Electron Microscopy Reveals the Formation Mechanism of New Cubic and Truncated Octahedral CeO(2) Nanoparticles2011In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 1038-1044Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development of new analytical tools for nanostructures directly contributes to the study of catalysts. By using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with a newly designed signal enhancer, we study cubic and truncated octahedral cerium oxide (CeO(2)) nanoparticles, which are composed of smaller primary octahedral CeO(2) and are formed through bond formation with hexanedioic acid. The signal enhancer is designed to efficiently collect secondary electrons of kinetic energy less than 10 eV; thus, it greatly improves the S/N ratio. On the basis of the observed SEM images and electron backscattered diffraction patterns of the cross section of the nanoparticles, we discuss the formation mechanism of the nanoparticles and speculate that the primary CeO(2) nanocrystals share their edges in the cubic nanoparticles and truncated octahedral nanoparticles. These results will contribute to the preparation of nanostructured metal oxide surfaces with controlled morphologies that could enhance catalytic activity.

  • 3.
    Buitrago, Elina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lundberg, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Andersson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ryberg, Per
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    High Throughput Screening of a Catalyst Library for the Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation of Heteroaromatic Ketones: Formal Syntheses of (R)-Fluoxetine and (S)-Duloxetine2012In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 4, no 12, p. 2082-2089Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A total of 21 amino acid based ligands including hydroxy amide, thioamide, and hydroxamic acid functionalities, respectively, were combined with [Ru(p-cymene)Cl2]2 and [RhCp*Cl2]2, and used as catalysts for the asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of four different heteroaromatic ketones in 2-propanol. The reactions were performed on a Chemspeed automated high-throughput screening robotic platform. Optimal catalysts were identified for the individual heterocyclic substrate classes. Based on these results, the formal syntheses of the antidepressant drugs (R)-fluoxetine and (S)-duloxetine were conducted by using the found catalysts in the key reaction step, which results in high isolated yields (94?%) and excellent product enantioselectivities (>99?% ee) of the formed 1,3-amino alcohols.

  • 4. Coll, Mercedes
    et al.
    Pamies, Oscar
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Dieguez, Montserrat
    Second-Generation Amino Acid Furanoside Based Ligands from D-Glucose for the Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation of Ketones2013In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 5, no 12, p. 3821-3828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel series of modular amino acid thioamide ligands functionalized with carbohydrates were introduced and employed in the rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) of aryl alkyl ketones, including the less-studied heteroaromatic ketones. The ligands are based on amino acid hydroxyamides (pseudodipeptides), which are the most successful ligands previously used in asymmetric hydrogen transfer reactions. High enantioselectivities [up to 99% enantiomeric excess (ee)] were achieved in the ATH of a wide range of aryl alkyl ketones by using catalysts generated insitu from [RhCl2Cp*](2) (Cp*=C5Me5) and thioamide ligands comprising a 3-benzyl glucofuranoside backbone and a bulky isopropyl group in the -amino acid moiety. Interestingly, both enantiomers of the alcohol products can readily be obtained with high enantioselectivity by simply changing the absolute configuration of the -amino acid. The good performance can be extended to a very challenging class of industrially interesting heteroaromatic ketones (up to 99%ee).

  • 5. Garcia-Martinez, Javier
    et al.
    Xiao, Changhong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Cychosz, Katie A.
    Li, Kunhao
    Wan, Wei
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Thommes, Matthias
    Evidence of Intracrystalline Mesostructured Porosity in Zeolites by Advanced Gas Sorption, Electron Tomography and Rotation Electron Diffraction2014In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 6, no 11, p. 3110-3115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The small size of micropores (typically <1 nm) in zeolites causes slow diffusion of reactant and product molecules in and out of the pores and negatively impacts the product selectivity of zeolite based catalysts, for example, fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts. Size-tailored mesoporosity was introduced into commercial zeolite Y crystals by a simple surfactant-templating post-synthetic mesostructuring process. The resulting mesoporous zeolite Y showed significantly improved product selectivity in both laboratory testing and refinery trials. Advanced characterization techniques such as electron tomography, three-dimensional rotation electron diffraction, and high resolution gas adsorption coupled with hysteresis scanning and density functional theory, unambiguously revealed the intracystalline nature and connectivity of the introduced mesopores. They can be considered as molecular highways that help reactant and product molecules diffuse quickly to and away from the catalytically active sites within the zeolite crystals and, thus, shift the selectivity to favor the production of more of the valuable liquid fuels at reduced yields of coke and unconverted feed.

  • 6. Ghobril, Cynthia
    et al.
    Hammar, Peter
    Kodepelly, Sanjeevarao
    Spiess, Bernard
    Wagner, Alain
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Baati, Rachid
    Structure-Reactivity Relationship Studies for Guanidine-Organocatalyzed Direct Intramolecular Aldolization of Ketoaldehydes2010In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 2, no 12, p. 1573-1581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Structure-reactivity studies are performed to explore the reaction mechanism of the guanidine-catalyzed intramolecular aldol reaction of ketoaldehydes. A large number of guanidine and guanidine-like catalysts are synthesized and their properties studied. Kinetic profiles and pK(a) values of the catalysts are measured and correlated to reaction barriers calculated using density functional theory (DFT). The DFT calculations show that structural rigidity influences the pKa of the guanidines. Although the basicity is a very important factor in the catalysis, it is not sufficient to fully account for its catalytic efficiency. The availability of two aligned nitrogen reaction sites for proton shuttling in the transition state is an essential feature that helps to rationalize the reactivity pattern and the activation mode for this family of organocatalysts.

  • 7.
    Nordin, Mikael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    Ahlford, Katrin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Theoretical study of asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones catalyzed by amino acid derived rhodium complexes2012In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 4, no 8, p. 1095-1104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Density functional theory calculations are employed to study the asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones catalyzed by rhodiumarene complexes containing hydroxamic acid-functionalized amino acid ligands. Firstly, the ligandmetal binding is investigated and it is shown that both the N,N and O,O binding modes Are viable. For each of these, the full free energy profile for the transfer hydrogenation is calculated according to the outer-sphere reaction mechanism. Three factors are demonstrated to influence the stereoselectivity of the process, namely the energy difference between the metalligand binding modes, the energy difference between the intermediate hydrogenated catalyst, and the existence of a stabilizing CHp interaction between the Cp* ligand of the catalyst and the phenyl moiety of the substrate. Theoretical reproduction of the selectivity of a slightly modified ligand that is shown experimentally to yield the opposite enantioselectivity corroborates these results. Finally, a technical observation made is that inclusion of dispersion interactions (using the B3LYP-D2 correction or the M06 functional) proved to be very important for reproducing the enantioselectivity.

  • 8. Roberts, F. Sloan
    et al.
    Kuhl, Kendra P.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Electroreduction of Carbon Monoxide Over a Copper Nanocube Catalyst: Surface Structure and pH Dependence on Selectivity2016In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 1119-1124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The activity and selectivity for CO2/CO reduction over Cu electrodes is strongly dependent on the local surface structure of the catalyst and the pH of the electrolyte. Here we investigate a unique, Cu nanocube surface (CuCube) as a CO reduction electrode under neutral and basic pH by using online electrochemical mass spectroscopy (OLEMS) to determine the onset potentials and relative intensities of methane and ethylene production. To relate the unique selectivity to the surface structure, the CuCube surface reactivity is compared to polycrystalline Cu and three single crystals under the same reaction conditions. We find that the high selectivity for ethylene over the CuCube surface is most comparable to the Cu(100) surface, which has a cubic unit cell. However, the suppression of methane production over CuCube is unique to that particular surface. A basic pH is shown to enhance ethylene selectivity on all surfaces, and again the CuCube surface is unique.

  • 9.
    Sahoo, Suman
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Lundberg, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Edén, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Physical Chemistry.
    Ahlsten, Nanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Wan, Wei
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Single Site Supported Cationic Rhodium(I) Complexes for the Selective Redox Isomerization of Allylic Alcohols2012In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 243-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The isomerization of allylic alcohols to carbonyl compounds by a heterogeneous rhodium complex is reported. Different silica material supports and catalyst/ligand systems were evaluated. The most efficient catalyst in terms of catalytic activity and stability was found to be a cationic rhodium(I) complex with sulfonated phosphine ligands anchored on a mesoporous aluminosilica AlSBA-15. The heterogeneous complex catalyzed the isomerization of a variety of allylic alcohols in excellent yields with very low catalyst loadings (0.5 mol %). The catalyst could be recycled without significant loss of activity or selectivity. The optimized catalyst was characterized by N2 sorption, powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, as well as solution and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, and Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopies.

  • 10.
    Shatskiy, Andrey
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kivijärvi, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lundberg, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Tinnis, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ruthenium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation of Propargylic Ketones2015In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 7, no 23, p. 3818-3821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of alpha,beta-propargyl ketones catalyzed by an in situ formed ruthenium-hydroxyamide complex was explored. The acetylenic alcohols were isolated in good to excellent yields with excellent ee values (typically >90%) after short reaction times at room temperature.

  • 11.
    Slagbrand, Tove
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kivijärvi, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bimetallic Catalysis: Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation of Sterically Hindered Ketones Catalyzed by Ruthenium and Potassium2015In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 7, no 21, p. 3445-3449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient protocol for the asymmetric reduction of sterically hindered ketones under transfer-hydrogenation conditions was developed. The corresponding chiral alcohols were obtained in good to excellent yields with enantiomeric excess values up to 99%. The role of the cation associated with the base present in the reduction reaction was investigated. In contrast to previous studies on this catalyst system, potassium ions rather than lithium ions significantly enhanced the reaction outcome.

  • 12. Steffen-Munsberg, Fabian
    et al.
    Vickers, Clare
    Thontowi, Ahmad
    Schaetzle, Sebastian
    Meinhardt, Tina
    Humble, Maria Svedendahl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Land, Henrik
    Berglund, Per
    Bornscheuer, Uwe T.
    Hoehne, Matthias
    Revealing the structural basis of promiscuous amine transaminase activity2013In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 154-157Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Steffen-Munsberg, Fabian
    et al.
    Vickers, Clare
    Thontowi, Ahmad
    Schaetzle, Sebastian
    Tumlirsch, Tony
    Humble, Maria Svedendahl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Land, Henrik
    Berglund, Per
    Bornscheuer, Uwe T.
    Hoehne, Matthias
    Connecting unexplored protein crystal structures to enzymatic function2013In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 150-153Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14. Tsupova, Svetlana
    et al.
    Cadu, Alban
    Stuck, Fabian
    Rominger, Frank
    Rudolph, Matthias
    Samec, Joseph S. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Hashmi, A. Stephen K.
    Dual Gold(I)-catalyzed Cyclization of Dialkynyl Pyridinium Salts2017In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 9, no 11, p. 1915-1920Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel dialkynyl pyridines were synthesized and protected as alkyl salts for dual gold(I)-catalyzed cycloisomerization. Different alkyl groups and counter ions were screened for the salts, with benzyl and hexafluorophosphate providing the best results. The cyclization led to NMR yields of >95% being obtained for a number of substrates. Step-wise hydrogenation of products could be performed in one-pot by Pd/C, with selective reduction of the double bonds, followed by deprotection of the benzyl group.

  • 15.
    Verho, Oscar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Gustafson, Karl P. J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Nagendiran, Anuja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Tai, Cheuk-Wai
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mild and Selective Hydrogenation of Nitro Compounds using Palladium Nanoparticles Supported on Amino-Functionalized Mesocellular Foam2014In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 6, no 11, p. 3153-3159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the utilization of a heterogeneous catalyst comprised of Pd nanoparticles supported on aminopropyl-functionalized siliceous mesocellular foam (Pd-0-AmP-MCF) for the selective hydrogenation of aromatic, aliphatic, and heterocyclic nitro compounds to the corresponding amines. In general, the catalytic protocol exclusively affords the desired amine products in excellent yields within short reaction times with the reactions performed at room temperature under ambient pressure of H-2. Moreover, the reported Pd nanocatalyst displayed excellent structural integrity for this transformation as it could be recycled multiple times without any observable loss of activity or leaching of metal. In addition, the Pd nanocatalyst could be easily integrated into a continuous-flow device and used for the hydrogenation of 4-nitroanisole on a 2.5 g scale, where the product p-anisidine was obtained in 95% yield within 2 h with a Pd content of less than 1 ppm.

  • 16.
    Verho, Oscar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Nagendiran, Anuja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johnston, Eric V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Tai, Cheuk-wai
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Nanopalladium on Amino-Functionalized Mesocellular Foam: An Efficient Catalyst for Suzuki Reactions and Transfer Hydrogenations2013In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 612-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The applications of a heterogeneous Pd0-AmP-MCF nanoparticle catalyst in Suzuki cross-coupling reactions and transfer hydrogenations of alkenes are described. The catalyst was highly efficient for both transformations, resulting in 1)coupling of a wide range of aryl halides with various boronic acids in high yields and 2)chemoselective reduction of a variety of alkenes with the use of 1-methyl-1,4-cyclohexadiene as hydrogen donor. Moreover, the catalyst can be recycled several times without any significant decrease in activity or leaching of metal into solution, making the protocol economical and environmentally friendly. In the case of the Suzuki cross-coupling, a 15-fold increase in reaction rate was observed if the reaction was performed under microwave irradiation compared to conventional heating in an oil bath.

  • 17.
    Verho, Oscar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Nagendiran, Anuja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Tai, Cheuk-Wai
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Johnston, Eric V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Nanopalladium on Amino-Functionalized Mesocellular Foam as an Efficient and Recyclable Catalyst for the Selective Transfer Hydrogenation of Nitroarenes to Anilines2014In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 205-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein, we report on the use of nanopalladium on amino-functionalized siliceous mesocellular foam as an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for the transfer hydrogenation of nitroarenes to anilines. In all cases, the protocol proved to be highly selective and favored the formation of the desired aniline as the single product in high yields with short reaction times if naturally occurring and renewable -terpinene was employed as the hydrogen donor. Furthermore, the catalyst displayed excellent recyclability over five cycles and negligible leaching of metal into solution, which makes it an eco-friendly and economic catalyst to perform this transformation. The scalability of the protocol was demonstrated with the reduction of 4-nitroanisole on a 2g scale, in which p-anisidine was isolated in 98% yield.

  • 18.
    Verho, Oscar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zheng, Haoquan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Gustafson, Karl P. J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Nagendiran, Anuja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Application of Pd Nanoparticles Supported on Mesoporous Hollow Silica Nanospheres for the Efficient and Selective Semihydrogenation of Alkynes2016In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 773-778Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein, the preparation of a heterogeneous catalyst consisting of 1-2nm sized Pd nanoparticles supported on amino-functionalized mesoporous hollow silica nanospheres and its use for the semihydrogenation of mono- and disubstituted alkynes is reported. By utilizing this Pd nanocatalyst together with the green poisoning agent DMSO, high yields of the desired alkenes could be achieved, while suppressing the degree of over-reduction to alkanes. To our delight, the Pd nanocatalyst displayed remarkable chemoselectivity towards the alkyne moiety, allowing the transformation to be carried out in the presence of other reducible functionalities, such as halogens, carbonyl, and nitro groups.

  • 19.
    Vico Solano, Marta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    González Miera, Greco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pascanu, Vlad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Inge, A. Ken
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Martín‐Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Versatile Heterogeneous Palladium Catalysts for Diverse Carbonylation Reactions under Atmospheric Carbon Monoxide Pressure2018In: ChemCatChem, ISSN 1867-3880, E-ISSN 1867-3899, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 1089-1095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein, we report a versatile carbonylation protocol using heterogeneous Pd-0 nanoparticles supported on the metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) MIL-88B-NH2 (Fe/Cr). The synthesis of a vast array of carbonyls, which includes amides, esters, carboxylic acids, and -ketoamides, was achieved through mono- and dicarbonylation reactions. The selectivity could be controlled simply by tuning the reaction conditions. Superior activity and selectivity were recorded in some cases compared to that achieved with commercial Pd/C. However, the utility of an elaborate catalyst support is questionable and important reactivity and recyclability issues are discussed.

1 - 19 of 19
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