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  • 1. Doughty, Karolina
    et al.
    Lagerqvist, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    The ethical potential of sound in public space: Migrant pan flute music and its potential to create moments of conviviality in a 'failed' public square2016In: Emotion, Space and Society, ISSN 1755-4586, E-ISSN 1878-0040, Vol. 20, p. 58-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we examine the notion that music in public space could be understood in terms of ethical potential, where new sensibilities for thinking, feeling, seeing and being with others might be imagined and practiced. We do this by considering how musical performances by migrants impact on inclusive forms of place (re-)making, affective enactments of public space and emotional accounts of belonging and 'the other'. The paper draws on an ethnographic exploration of South American pan flute musicians, performing music at Sergels torg, a central square in Stockholm, Sweden. Through fieldwork with a combination of qualitative techniques, including observation, interviews and sensory methods such as photography, video and recorded 'sound walks' we trace the affective aspects of encounters with busking and the impact of music on place. We highlight the ethical potential of music in the experience of urban moments and its capacity to reconfigure space. We find that encounters with sound can produce new spaces of conviviality and inclusion; it can soothe, animate and soften urban spaces. However, a positive encounter with difference through sound depends on a favourable social, physical and temporal context, and because busking serves to make marginalised voices heard (both literally and metaphorically), it can be experienced as troubling for precisely this reason. Thus, we need to take into account the full complexity of the dynamics between sound and place, in considering this relationship as a novel window to the ethical potential of the urban encounter.

  • 2.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Retrospective reflexivity: The residual and subliminal repercussions of researching war2015In: Emotion, Space and Society, ISSN 1755-4586, E-ISSN 1878-0040, no 0Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stories of the war have been a known part of my story as granddaughter of Polish post-war migrants. Yet venturing into these stories as researcher has been troubling; I found their closeness and their raw emotion difficult to process. Significant sections of my interview schedules entailed participants recounting their own, their parents' or their grandparents' stories of war and migration, with traumatic episodes frequently intersecting into their stories. As a researcher, these traumatic narratives have had a residual quality, lasting in my subconscious long after the interviews themselves and doctorate for which they were conducted had finished. In this paper, I focus on experiences of, and reactions to listening to, analysing and writing about these traumatic cultural memories. Collins (1998: 3.35) has observed that ‘the emotions experienced, whether by the interviewer or interviewee, are as real, as important and as interesting as any other product of the interview’; my powerfully felt experiences with traumatic content have validated this sentiment. With a retrospective reflexivity I now realise that these cultural memories were not the only ‘product’ of my research, but that how they were narrated and how I dealt with them were also a significant part of the research process, and indeed stories in themselves. Here I attempt to retell how these stories impacted me as the researcher; how in the case of particularly harrowing stories, I also needed time to absorb the narratives, to comprehend the participant's experiences and their ability to narrate such stories, and to recover from the experience of listening to such accounts.

  • 3.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    et al.
    University of New South Wales.
    Dominey-Howes, Dale
    Research and trauma: Understanding the impact of traumatic content and places on the researcher2015In: Emotion, Space and Society, ISSN 1755-4586, E-ISSN 1878-0040, Vol. 17, p. 17-21Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Eriksson, Christine
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Sand, Monica
    Belonging in transience: Vocal mapping for a commuting preschool practice2018In: Emotion, Space and Society, ISSN 1755-4586, E-ISSN 1878-0040, Vol. 29, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores and elaborates art theorist Miwon Kwon's (2004) concept of belonging-in-transience through placing a preschool practice in the urban transport system and ask how toddlers can belong in public space. Belonging-in-transience is here seen as a collectively shared emotion system that can be described as ambivalent pre-personal intensities of emotions not yet stated. When a small group of preschool toddlers enters the public transport system - what the anthropologist Marc Auge terms non-places that lack particular shared cultural and social meaning - they both integrate into the routines and rhythms and intervene with the practice of traveling. The article outlines how belonging-in-transience consist of multiple ways to belong that always emerge in and through specific situations and places at hand. The methodological concepts vocal mappings and voice belongings, was developed as a way to delineate how the toddlers orientated themselves in the feeling of belonging through experimentations. Voice belonging and vocal mapping expose belonging as reciprocally dependent on the situation that at the same time influences possible ways of belonging.

  • 5.
    Jonasson, Kalle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies. Malmö University, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Unpacking competition: On the possibilities of a minor sport2014In: Emotion, Space and Society, ISSN 1755-4586, E-ISSN 1878-0040, Vol. 12, p. 4-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, I conceptualize defensive playing in table tennis by analyzing it from the viewpoint of affective philosophy (Deleuze and Guattari, 1986, 1987). The spatial and emotional aspects of the atmosphere of such play are investigated through an autoethnography of company table tennis. By using my ownbody as an instrument of research (Longhurst et al., 2008), I practically evoke and feed on the tension between modern competitive sport and sport for all (Eichberg, 2010). It is suggested that the defensive stance in table tennis might be seen as a trajectory toward a minor sport (Deleuze and Guattari, 1986, 1987), i.e. as a mild resistance to the competitive ethos of sport.

  • 6.
    Lund, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    ‘I feel sorry for them and I should do something, but I don't’: Spatial imaginaries and resistance to feminist change in the dramatic arts2019In: Emotion, Space and Society, ISSN 1755-4586, E-ISSN 1878-0040, Vol. 30, p. 27-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article engages with how emotions play a significant role in keeping, and changing, social structures and cultural beliefs when a heteronormative gender order is problematized. The stage is university level programs in performer training and their work to integrate theoretical knowledge on gender into students' creative and pedagogical practice. The results show that changes in space, new spatial imaginaries, bring about a power disturbance and status relations that require a re-monitoring of who we are in the eyes of others. The article illustrates how fear can reveal where individuals’ and groups interests lie and orient them toward what must be done to preserve or develop these interests in a desirable direction. The reason feelings of fear, anger and shame emerge in reaction to changing power and status relations is that a decline in status and power entails a loss of agency as well as emotional and economic security, and in a deeper sense existential meaning and identity.

  • 7.
    Pedersen, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Parasitic pedagogies and materialities of affect in veterinary education2015In: Emotion, Space and Society, ISSN 1755-4586, E-ISSN 1878-0040, Vol. 14, p. 50-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article contributes a critical post-humanist analysis of emotion, education, and human animal relations, including a reinterpretation of previous research on shared suffering (Haraway, 2008; Porcher, 2011) in human animal instrumental encounters. Considering how formal education, particularly a professional education program such as veterinary medical education that relies heavily on scientific facts about animals and biotechnology, recruits bodily and sensory affect to mediate techniques of animal exploitation, the article asks how we can begin to make sense of such an affective animal didactics? Drawing on ethnographic material from three events in theoretical and practice-oriented veterinary education, the article explores how bodily and sensory human/animal/technology intimacy enters education as a pedagogical device and as a subtle reinforcement of bio-economic parasitism on farmed animals' productive and reproductive capacities. The article reworks the notion of shared suffering into forms of modulation and distribution of affect to conceptualize a particular didactics of incorporating human/nonhuman interaction in the bio-economic microphysics of education.

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