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  • 1. Andersson, Lars Gustaf
    et al.
    Sundholm, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    The cultural practice of minor cinema archiving: The case of immigrant filmmakers in Sweden2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 79-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to present the archival practice behind two extensive research projects that we have worked on during the last decade: the Stockholm Film Workshop and minor immigrant filmmaking in Sweden. Archive has become a general catchword in today’s academia that encompasses several practices of collecting, storing, distributing and displaying. We will stress in particular – partly against the idealism of digital activism – that the archive is a locus of power. The struggle for archival acknowledgement is a question of how to establish an archival artefact, an object that may be stored and repeated, and thus to affirm it as something that cannot be disregarded. This is a practice in the way that theory also constitutes a practice: a way of intervening that is case sensitive and that constantly cuts across those four principles that Giovanna Fossati famously coined as ‘film as original’, ‘film as art’, ‘film as dispositif’ and ‘film as state of the art’.

  • 2.
    Bachmann, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    The press cutting, film studies and the digital age2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 149-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unlike the scrapbook, the humble press cutting has never quite broken the surface in the theoretical and methodological discourses of historiography, whether for film or other kinds of histories. In today's radically changed archive-scape where old volumes of printed media are digitized by the shelf-load, the blessings and curses of the curated collection may rapidly fade from short-term memory. At the same time, this novel sense of distance towards them can prove useful for discussing the impact of the collections' provenance and bias. In tracing the press-cuttings collection in Swedish press discourse during the twentieth century, the article argues that its meaning has shifted over time, most clearly signalling status, progress and knowledge optimism in the 1940s to 1960s. Lastly, the article maps the discourse and history of cuttings at the Swedish Film Institute and suggests that the press-cutting archive is now more interesting in its entirety as collection than by virtue of its individual scraps and pieces.

  • 3. Brunow, Dagmar
    et al.
    Stigsdotter, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    A film of her own: Home movies, the archive and Ingrid Bergman: An interview with Stig Björkman and Dominika Daubenbüchel2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 183-188Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4. Brunow, Dagmar
    et al.
    Stigsdotter, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Scandinavian cinema 
culture and archival 
practices: Collecting, curating and accessing moving image histories2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 75-78Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5. Hongisto, Ilona
    et al.
    Wahlberg, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Guest Editorial2016In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 77-80Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Koivunen, Anu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Authorial self-fashioning in Jörn Donner’s Portraits of Women2015In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 93-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In his films of the late 1960s and the early 1970s, Jörn Donner, a Swedish-speaking Finnish author, critic and film director, employed his body and popular media image as a contemporary celebrity for narrative and marketing purposes. Focusing on the film Naisenkuvia/Portraits of Women (1970), a metanarrative about the alliance of art cinema and pornography in the 1960s and a parody of Donner’s public persona, this article investigates Donner’s ‘authoring practices’ and gestures of authorial ‘self-projection’ amidst the mediatized sexual revolution of the 1960s. Portraits of Women reveals Donner's appropriation and analysis of a newly sexualized public sphere, but the film also reads as a crisis point. While capitalizing on his public persona by casting himself as the male lead, Donner was forced to acknowledge that self-fashioning in the sphere of public sex escapes authorial control.

  • 7.
    Koivunen, Anu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Talking heads, imagined communities: steam of Life and the affective politics of intimate documentary2012In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 97-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a cycle of new Finnish documentaries, male confessional talk abounds. Beyond the successful Miesten vuoro/Steam of Life (Joonas Berghäll and Mika Hotakainen, 2010), several recent documentaries propose to give voice to ordinary Finnish men who reveal their true feelings to other men. In this article, Steam of Life is discussed as a case of intimate documentary, drawing on both the political aesthetics of feminist documentary and the transnational, late modern rhetoric of confession.Employing the complex affective legacies of the talking head, the film engages in performative politics of gender and nation. It mobilizes a discourse on the nation as a male network, and importantly evokes nation as a sentimental community, a community based on feeling. In so doing, however, it de-individualizes the speaking subjects. While purporting to give voice to the male protagonists, the film makes them anonymous soldiers of the nation, thereby denying them their own voices.

  • 8.
    Koskinen, Maaret
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Multiple Adaptation Processes: The case of Alexander Ahndoril's "The Director" and its predecessors in feature film, television documentary and popular print media2015In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 35-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that the novel by Alexander Ahndoril, Regissören/The Director (2006/2008), partially adapts Ingmar Bergman’s film Nattvardsgästerna/The Communicants (1963). It is less well known that the novel also adapts a television documentary about the shoot of The Communicants made in 1962 for Swedish public television by Vilgot Sjöman. In Ahndoril’s novel, then, the transfer moves from Bergman’s film and Sjöman’s documentary to the novel, in contrast to conventional adaptation practice, which moves in the opposite direction. Furthermore, besides moving images, other media have been adapted in Ahndoril’s novel, for example, feature stories in Swedish women’s magazines on Bergman and then-wife Käbi Laretei’s domestic life. Finally, Bergman’s journals have also been adapted, not from the original source text, however, but as represented in academic publications. In sum, Ahndoril’s novel is the result of a multiple adaptation process, involving not only moving images in the form of an art-film feature and a television documentary, but also still photography, popular print media and an academic publication. As such the novel also points towards a broader cultural adaptation process.

  • 9.
    Koskinen, Maaret
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Time, memory and actors: Representation of ageing in recent Swedish feature film2019In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 89-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As has been noted in scholarship across various disciplines, issues of age and ageing have attracted much interest in recent years. In film production as well, ageing character actors have entered centre stage, in both popular films (for instance the Hotel Marigold films) and existential dramas (for instance Lucky, with 90-year-old Harry Dean Stanton in his last role). However, little has been written on Swedish film production in this regard. This article attempts to demonstrate, through an empirical overview, that interest in age and ageing has increased in feature film during the last two decades, not only internationally but more specifically in Swedish film. This article also strives to hypothesize, drawing on the area of memory studies, that the mere representation of ageing bodies and identities by well-known actors may inspire positive affective experiences related to memory, and that such representations, accumulatively across time, may be beneficial to health.

  • 10.
    Larsson, Mariah
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Ingmar Bergman, Swedish sexploitation and early Swedish porn2015In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 49-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses intertextual relations between Ingmar Bergman films and four films from the Swedish history of late 1960s and 1970s sexploitation and pornography. Although Bergman played a significant role in the liberalization of film censorship in Sweden in the 1960s and was known for the beautiful actresses of his films, that he demonstrably inspired film-makers operating in what is usually regarded as the complete opposite of art cinema is not so widely known. In the films Jag – en oskuld/Inga (1968), Thriller – en grym film/Thriller – A Cruel Picture (1974), Justine och Juliette/Justine and Juliette (1975) and Fäbodjäntan/Come Blow the Horn (1978) there are several intertextual relations, both deliberate allusions and more implicit and unintended connections. These relations may have an impact on how we regard both the role of Bergman and the directors of sexually explicit films in the particular context of Sweden in the 1960s and 1970s.

  • 11.
    Larsson, Mariah
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Joe Sarno and Historiography: Some Thoughts on The Sarnos: A Life in Dirty Movies2013In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 101-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent Swedish documentary The Sarnos: A Life in Dirty Movies (Eriksson, 2013) evokes questions about historiography and nationality. This article discusses the documentary's focus on Joe Sarno's reluctance to do hardcore, on his wife, Peggy, as well as the couple's relationship to Sweden.

  • 12.
    Noheden, Kristoffer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Hypnotic ecology: Environmental melancholia in Lars von Trier’s films2018In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 135-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines Lars von Trier’s The Element of Crime (1984), Antichrist (2009) and Melancholia (2011) from the perspective of ecological theories that seek to go beyond the green ecological paradigm. The three films depict the environment as fraught with a sense of unease, bound up with a melancholia that may be caused by either too little or too much intimacy with the non-human. The article shows that Trier’s despair and irony, anchored in a modernist distrust of reason, may be attuned to the conditions of the Anthropocene. Examining Trier’s allusions to pre-modern forms of knowledge reveals that his depictions of hypnosis and depression evoke privileged forms of knowledge that extend the environmental disaster to cosmic proportions. Turning to notions of dark ecology, the article argues that Trier’s black sensibility holds the seeds of a positive ecological awareness of interconnectedness and interdependence of humans with the surrounding world.

  • 13.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    ‘Asta’s ink: The Stockholm letters2012In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 5-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article offers a condensed account of Asta Nielsen's interaction with the Swedish National Censorship Board in 1911 after the banning of her film In dem großen Augenblick/The Great Moment for screening in Sweden. Her strategy, publishing open letters and inviting representatives from the press to non-public screenings, set the standard for other film companies dissatisfied with the slew of bans issued by the Board. A Nielsen letter to young movie fans, published in facsimile in a Swedish fan magazine in 1920, is translated to illustrate a different type of press interaction a decade later.

  • 14.
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Stiller at first: A footnote2014In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 5-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article disentangles the confusion surrounding the production order of Mauritz Stiller’s film activities during his first months at AB Svenska Biografteatern (Svenska bio)/Swedish Biograph in 1912. Drawing on items from the extensive Stockholm press scene, it can be demonstrated that Stiller’s first film production indeed was the one that was first publicly screened, Mor och dotter/‘Mother and Daughter’ (1912) featuring Stiller, Anna Norrie and Lilly Jacobsson. The article also sheds light on Stiller’s role in Stockholm bohemian circles as local film production was ushered in.

  • 15.
    Rozenkrantz, Jonathan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Expanded epistemologies: Animation meets live action in contemporary Swedish documentary film2016In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 189-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This short subject studies configurations of animation and live action in contemporary Swedish documentary film. While digitization has challenged the indexical images verifying function, animation has been elevated to the level of legitimate document. The epistemological boundaries of documentary film have consequently been expanded, and now include the inner worlds of social subjects. In Gomd (Hidden) (Heilborn and Aronowitsch, 2002), animation and live action are repeatedly juxtaposed in order to visualize a refugee childs experienced Otherness. In Still Born (Sandzen, 2014), ultrasound footage is fused with digital film and animation to manifest the merging perspectives of a mourning mother and her aborted child.

  • 16.
    Soila, Tytti
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Reflections in the mirror of melancholia: On the narrative and male heritage in Napapiirin sankarit/Lapland Odyssey (Karukoski, 2010)2013In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 87-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article argues that Dome Karukoski’s Napapiirin sankarit/Lapland Odyssey (2010) inflects the journey narrative with irony and melancholy to reflect critically but comically on Finnish models of masculinity.

  • 17.
    Stigsdotter, Ingrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Brunow, Dagmar
    Retrieving Harry Schein from the archive: An interview with Maud Nycander, Jannike Åhlund and Kersti Grunditz Brennan2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 177-181Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Sörensen, Lars-Martin
    et al.
    The Danish Film Institute, Denmark.
    Sundholm, John
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Editorial2012In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 197-200Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19. Sørenssen, Bjørn
    et al.
    Salmi, Hannu
    Vestergaard Kau, Edvin
    Olsson, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    World War II and Scandinavian cinema: An overview2012In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 201-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article gives a short introduction to the distinctly different wartime experiences of the film industries in the Nordic countries during World War II.

  • 20.
    Wahlberg, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Adventures in murky waters: The enactment and commemoration of Kon-Tiki2013In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 141-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1947, Thor Heyerdahl and five crewmembers accomplished a 6900 km sea voyage on a reconstructed balsa wood raft to prove that Peruvian Indians could have settled in Polynesia. The article addresses the meanings of authenticity, enactment and cultural memory in relation to the expedition film Kon-Tiki (Heyerdahl and Nordemar, 1950). The film’s production history and its international success are part of a postwar media event, in itself a trans-Atlantic adventure that has only recently been the subject of scholarly attention.

  • 21.
    Wahlberg, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Artfilm in prime time: Educational programming, cultural heritage and experimental images in early Swedish television2015In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 241-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arts television has attracted scholarly attention because of its practice of re-representation, combined with an educational policy that aspired to teach ‘good taste’ to a broader audience. During the 1950s and the early 1960s, the educational and aesthetic merit of ‘art films’ was broadly recognized in Sweden, where a striking number of television programmes were dedicated to visual art. In 1956 an official state report described television as ‘to date [the] most promising tool for art propaganda’. Unlike related productions in the United Kingdom and elsewhere, the presentation of art films in Sweden also depended on a strong concern with film art. In addition to special programmes on art history and individual artists, broadcasts included experimental cinema and amateur competitions. This article accounts for the hybrid aesthetics and the intermedial and transnational appearance of the art film for public television, with special attention to those produced by the Swedish Film Unit. Here, ‘style’ is not only invoked as a matter of form and signature but also as an aesthetic ideal reflecting the educational directions and cultural doxa of early television programming. As a historical case study on media convergence, documentary form and modes of address in early public television, the example of the Swedish Film Unit illuminates a media history that upsets any simple boundary between film and television, recalling the important historical context of film art, documentary media cultures and broadcasting history.

  • 22.
    Wahlberg, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    The revelation of TV memories in The Black Power Mixtape 1967-19752012In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 113-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The timely subject of revolutionary struggle and the exotic record of films intended for a Swedish TV audience propelled the recent success of The Black Power Mixtape 1967–1975 by Göran Hugo Olsson (2011). The film exemplifies the processes of selection and re-enactment that are immanent to compilation aesthetics, while drawing attention to the overlooked archive memory of public television.

  • 23.
    Wahlberg, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Vietnam in transmission: Documentary Film and Solidarity programming in Swedish Broadcasting Culture (1967-72)2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 43-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A case study of the Swedish and transnational context of film, media activism and public broadcasting culture in the late 1960s and early 1970s, this article suggests a reassessment of the ‘solidarity film’ as a TV genre in the era of the Vietnam War. In 1969-70, in the two public channels of Swedish Television, the anti-war narrative would typically appear as a compilation of activist footage in obvious sympathy with the Vietnamese National Liberation Front, or as the reporter’s first-person impressions of everyday life and the traces of war in North Vietnamese villages. The activist material of the former and the subjective perspective of the latter provoked a heated media debate in Sweden, where journalists contested the simplistic and naïve feature of ‘documentary’ narratives, where activists deplored the cautious position of public TV producers, and where programme material was frequently criticized as either politically biased or visually offensive to the TV audience. Images of protest and a Swedish production history of ‘solidarity programming’ illuminate the paradoxical interrelations between the Vietnam movement and the negotiation of radical content in public television, particularly during the years 1967-72.

  • 24.
    Wallenberg, Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Fashion Studies.
    Traversing the gender binary: exploring 'new' Scandinavian trans cinema2015In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 169-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2002, Norwegian film-maker Even Benestad’s documentary Alt om min far/All About My Father (2002), featuring Benestad together with his transvestite father, premiered at several film festivals. The film soon won several awards, and was nominated for many more. It can be classified as a foundational piece within a Scandinavian context: it blazed the way for other more genuine, more serious, representations of transgender issues on film. Investigating the trans cinema that has come out of Scandinavia in the aftermath of Benestad’s film, this article relates this cinema to the New Queer Cinema and to recent social changes regarding political, medical and legal discourses and possibilities for transgender individuals. The films discussed include Alt om min far/All About My Father (Benestad, 2002); En soap/A soap (Christensen, 2006); Ångrarna/Regretters (Lindeen, 2010); Pojktanten/She Male Snails (Bergsmark, 2012); Ta av mig/Undress me (Lindgren, 2013); and Nånting måste gå sönder/Something Must Break (Bergsmark, 2014).

1 - 24 of 24
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