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  • 1.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    The significance of places: the Christianization of Scandinavia from a spatial point of view2013In: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 27-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The question of cult continuity from pagan temples' to Christian churches in Scandinavia is a classic issue in archaeology and history. In this paper the discussion is surveyed and new perspectives are outlined, based on the ritual differences between the two religious traditions. Churches were located in relation not so much to pagan ritual buildings as to different elements in multi-focused pagan ritual landscapes, for instance burial grounds. This means that the spatial patterns varied between different parts of Scandinavia.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Papmehl-Dufay, Ludvig
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Cultural interaction and change: a multi-isotopic approach to the Neolithization in coastal areas2013In: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 430-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on data from the megalithic tomb in Resmo on oland in the Baltic Sea, we use a multi-isotopic approach, involving the systematic treatment and modelling of extensive human and faunal isotopic data (C-14, C-13, N-15, S-34 and Sr-87/Sr-86), along with archaeological contextual evidence, to study change and interaction. The fact that people utilize aquatic resources necessitates modelling of the sulphur and strontium isotope data, to prevent the aquatic contribution from obscuring the local terrestrial signal. It was possible to demonstrate how the people buried in Resmo went through dynamic changes in diet, mobility patterns and cultural identity during more than two millennia of burial practice: from the incipient farmers of the Funnel Beaker Culture, through the cultural encounters and transitions during the Middle Neolithic, to the newcomers furthering intensified agriculture, trade and metal craftsmanship during the Bronze Age.

  • 3.
    Fernstal, Lotta
    Stockholm University.
    Spoken words: equality and dynamics within a group of women skalds in the third century AD, Skovgarde, Denmark2007In: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 263-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the third century AD a group of women, who wore a certain kind of bead set on the chest, was buried in a burial ground in Skovgarde in the southern part of Zealand in Denmark. I suggest that these women constituted a sub-group in which the members shared the skill of skalding and that the pieces in the bead sets, of which many were exotic and old already when they were worn, had been used as mnemonics during the composing of stories and poetry. The members of this sub-group were societal equals in the matter of class and gender but, nonetheless, a hierarchical order probably existed within the group based on skill, age and experience. However, the relations between the members of the group were probably mainly of a cooperative nature and as a sub-group they may have had opportunities for common strategies in society.

  • 4.
    Fredengren, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Unexpected Encounters with Deep Time Enchantment: Bog Bodies, Crannogs and Otherworldly' sites. The materializing powers of disjunctures in time2017In: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 482-499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The topic of deep time' has recently gained attention in the field of environmental humanities. In contrast, heritage studies have a narrower focus on the role of the past in the present. This paper probes into how encounters with deep time, archaeology and heritage could play a role in environmental ethics and issues of intergenerational justice and care. People's meetings with intermingled temporalities, and collisions of past and present, are highlighted through the peculiar and disruptive affect of exceptional preservation in crannogs, bog bodies, wetlands and lakes. It is argued that such archaeology has the potential to produce enchantment' effects, understood as energising moments of startling presence, which can be powerfully deployed to move people from ethical thinking and reflection towards ethical action. However, in order to acknowledge the particular power of deep-time archaeological effects, and to realise the potentialities of heritage, it needs to be approached differently.

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  • 5. Gingerich, Joseph A. M.
    et al.
    Sholts, Sabrina B.
    Wärmländer, Sebastian K. T. S.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Stanford, Dennis
    Fluted point manufacture in eastern North America: an assessment of form and technology using traditional metrics and 3D digital morphometrics2014In: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 101-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Differences in Paleoindian projectile point morphology have previously been used to define technologies, infer colonization patterns, propose chronological and regional boundaries. In this study, we evaluate the effectiveness of traditional linear measurements and ratios, flake scar angles, and 3D model-based flake contours for the statistical differentiation of projectile point type(s) and reduction technique. Sixty-three fluted bifaces from eastern North America and fourteen replicate Clovis points are analyzed. Discriminant analysis shows that 3D model-based Fourier descriptors of flake scar contours are less successful than traditional metrics in correctly differentiating styles, but more successful in identifying individual knappers. Changes in the symmetry of front and back flake scars between Clovis and later fluted point styles indicate a possible shift in reduction techniques. These findings demonstrate the usefulness of both traditional and modern morphometric variables to quantify biface morphology, and address questions about social interaction and technological change in Pleistocene North America.

  • 6.
    Monié Nordin, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Fernstål, Lotta
    Hyltén-Cavallius, Charlotte
    Living on the margin: an archaeology of a Swedish Roma camp2021In: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 517-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1959, the politics of assimilation led to the creation of a set of municipally organised camps for Roma people in the Stockholm area. The camps were to function as controlled settlements of transition for Roma families awaiting proper homes. This paper focuses on one such camp – the Skarpnäck Camp – which existed longer than anticipated, to the point that its continued operation was criticised as being inconsistent with the government’s assimilation policy. This paper represents an analysis of historical archaeological fieldwork at the former Skarpnäck Camp in southern Stockholm and is based upon interviews conducted with former inhabitants of and visitors to the camp. It uncovers aspects of Roma history on the margins of Swedish society and how marginalisation of the Roma group was given physical form in the creation of sanctioned camps. 

  • 7.
    Normark, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    The making of a home: Assembling houses at Nohcacab, Mexico2009In: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 430-444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    DeLanda's assemblage theory makes it possible to study assemblages like houses, households, organizations and lineages from a flat ontology where materialities and immaterialities are analyzed with the same basic tools. Houses are assemblages consisting of heterogeneous parts that form a functional and expressive whole that is different from its parts. Humans are parts of house assemblages and generate other assemblages extending beyond the physical territory of the buildings themselves. The buildings in the major household assemblage at the small, but densely settled, site of Nohcacab in Quintana Roo, Mexico, are used to show the workings of the multi-scalar assemblage approach. This household consists of smaller parts (artifacts, construction materials and different buildings) and it was part of greater assemblages (community, a nearby causeway system and trade networks).

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