Endre søk
Begrens søket
1 - 12 of 12
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Treff pr side
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
Merk
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Anastasia
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Jansson, Eeva
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen. Institute of Marine Research, Norway.
    Wennerström, Lovisa
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Chiriboga, Fidel
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Arnyasi, Mariann
    Kent, Matthew P.
    Ryman, Nils
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Laikre, Linda
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Complex genetic diversity patterns of cryptic, sympatric brown trout (Salmo trutta) populations in tiny mountain lakes2017Inngår i: Conservation Genetics, ISSN 1566-0621, E-ISSN 1572-9737, Vol. 18, nr 5, s. 1213-1227Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Intraspecific genetic variation can have similar effects as species diversity on ecosystem function; understanding such variation is important, particularly for ecological key species. The brown trout plays central roles in many northern freshwater ecosystems, and several cases of sympatric brown trout populations have been detected in freshwater lakes based on apparent morphological differences. In some rare cases, sympatric, genetically distinct populations lacking visible phenotypic differences have been detected based on genetic data alone. Detecting such cryptic sympatric populations without prior grouping of individuals based on phenotypic characteristics is more difficult statistically, though. The aim of the present study is to delineate the spatial connectivity of two cryptic, sympatric genetic clusters of brown trout discovered in two interconnected, tiny subarctic Swedish lakes. The structures were detected using allozyme markers, and have been monitored over time. Here, we confirm their existence for almost three decades and report that these cryptic, sympatric populations exhibit very different connectivity patterns to brown trout of nearby lakes. One of the clusters is relatively isolated while the other one shows high genetic similarity to downstream populations. There are indications of different spawning sites as reflected in genetic structuring among parr from different creeks. We used > 3000 SNPs on a subsample and find that the SNPs largely confirm the allozyme pattern but give considerably lower F (ST) values, and potentially indicate further structuring within populations. This type of complex genetic substructuring over microgeographical scales might be more common than anticipated and needs to be considered in conservation management.

  • 2.
    Dalén, Love
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Identifying species from pieces of faeces2004Inngår i: Conservation Genetics, ISSN 1566-0621, E-ISSN 1572-9737, Vol. 5, nr 1, s. 109-111Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 3.
    Gardestrom, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för systemekologi.
    Pereyra, Ricardo T.
    Andre, Carl
    Characterization of six microsatellite loci in the Baltic blue mussel Mytilus trossulus and cross-species amplification in North Sea Mytilus edulis2008Inngår i: Conservation Genetics, ISSN 1566-0621, E-ISSN 1572-9737, Vol. 9, nr 4, s. 1003-1005Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The blue mussel Mytilus trossulus occurs in the Pacific and in the North Atlantic. We developed and characterized six microsatellite loci for Baltic M. trossulus. Seventeen microsatellite loci were screened, of which six were polymorphic. The number of alleles among 50 individuals ranged from 3 to 13 and the observed and expected heterozygosity were 0.09-0.46 and 0.34-0.86, respectively. The loci were also tested for cross amplification in M. edulis, in which four of the six microsatellite loci were successfully amplified.

  • 4.
    Graves, JA
    et al.
    University St Andrews, Scotland.
    Helyar, A
    University St Andrews, Scotland.
    Biuw, M
    University St Andrews, Scotland.
    Jüssi, M
    Estonian Fund Nature, Tartu, Estonia.
    Jüssi, I
    Estonian Fund Nature, Tartu, Estonia.
    Karlsson, Olle
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Microsatellite and mtDNA analysis of the population structure of grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) from three breeding areas in the Baltic Sea2009Inngår i: Conservation Genetics, ISSN 1566-0621, E-ISSN 1572-9737, Vol. 10, s. 59-68Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing number of grey seals in the Baltic Sea has led to a dramatic increase in interactions between seals and fisheries. The conflict has become such a problem that hunting was introduced in Finland in 1998 and the Swedish Environment Protection Agency recommended a cull of grey seals starting in 2001. Culling has been implemented despite the lack of data on population structure. Low levels of migration between regions would mean that intensive culling in specific geographic areas would have disproportionate effects on local population structure and genetic diversity. We used eight microsatellite loci and a 489 bp section of the mtDNA control region to examine the genetic variability and differentiation between three breeding sites in the Baltic Sea and two in the UK. We found high levels of genetic variability in all sampled Baltic groups for both the microsatellites and the control region. There were highly significant differences in microsatellite allele frequencies between all three Baltic breeding sites and between the Baltic sites and the UK sites. However, there were no significant differences in mtDNA control region haplotypes between the Baltic sites. This genetic substructure of the Baltic grey seal populations should be taken into consideration when managing the seal population to prevent the hunting regime from having an adverse effect on genetic diversity by setting hunting quotas separately for the different subpopulations.

  • 5.
    Jansson, Mija
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Amundin, Mats
    Laikre, Linda
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Genetic contribution from a zoo population can increase genetic variation in the highly inbred wild Swedish wolf population2015Inngår i: Conservation Genetics, ISSN 1566-0621, E-ISSN 1572-9737, Vol. 16, nr 6, s. 1501-1505Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish wolf population (Canis lupus) descends from five individuals and is isolated and highly inbred with an average inbreeding coefficient of 0.27. In addition, inbreeding depression has led to reduced litter size and a high frequency of spinal disorders. To achieve the management goal of reducing the mean level of inbreeding, introductions into the wild population from a zoo conservation breeding program have been proposed by authorities. We used pedigree data of the wild and zoo populations to evaluate the extent to which the captive population can contribute genetic variation to the wild one. We measure genetic variation as founder alleles and founder genome equivalents. The two populations have three founders in common, but in spite of this common ancestry, our results show a potential to almost double genetic variation from 11.2 to 21.1 founder alleles. Similarly, the number of founder genome equivalents in the wild population can increase from the present 1.8 to 3.2, but this requires that almost 50 % of the wild gene pool consists of genes from the zoo population. Average kinship in the joint zoo and wild population is 0.15, which is above the management target of 0.1. Genetic contribution from the zoo has the potential to improve, but not solve, the genetically precarious situation of the wild population.

  • 6.
    Laikre, Linda
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Genetic diversity is overlooked in international conservation policy implementation.2010Inngår i: Conservation Genetics, ISSN 1566-0621, E-ISSN 1572-9737, Conservation Genetics, Vol. 11, s. 349-354Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of genetic variation for maintaining biological diversity and evolutionary processes has been recognized by researchers for decades. This realization has prompted agreements by world leaders toconserve genetic diversity, and this is an explicit goal of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). Nevertheless, very limited action has been taken to protect genetic diversity on a global scale. International conservation efforts to halt biodiversity loss focus on habitats and species,whereas little or no attention is paid to gene level variation. By this year, 2010, world leaders have agreed that a significant reduction of the rate of biodiversity loss should have been achieved. However, gene level diversity is still not monitored, indicators that can help identify threats to genetic variation are missing, and there is no strategy for how genetic aspects can be included in biodiversity targets beyond 2010. Important findings and conclusions from decades of conservation genetic research are not translated into concrete conservation action in the arena of international policy development. There is an urgent need for conservation geneticists worldwide to become involved in policy and practical conservation work beyond the universities and research institutions.

  • 7.
    Larsson, Lena C.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Charlier, Johan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Laikre, Linda
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Ryman, Nils
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Statistical power for detecting genetic divergence–organelle versus nuclear markers2009Inngår i: Conservation Genetics, ISSN 1566-0621, E-ISSN 1572-9737, Vol. 10, nr 5, s. 1255-1264Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Statistical power is critical in conservation for detecting genetic differences in space or time from allele frequency data. Organelle and nuclear genetic markers have fundamentally different transmission dynamics; the potential effect of these differences on power to detect divergence have been speculated on but not investigated. We examine, analytically and with computer simulations, the relative performance of organelle and nuclear markers under basic, ideal situations. We conclude that claims of a generally higher resolving power of either marker type are not correct. The ratio R = FST,organelle/FST,nuclear varies between 1 and 4 during differentiation and this greatly affects the power relationship. When nuclear FST is associated with organelle differentiation four times higher, the power of the organelle marker is similar to two nuclear loci with the same allele frequency distribution. With large sample sizes (n C 50) and several populations or many alleles per locus (C5), the power difference may typically be disregarded when nuclear FST[0.05. To correctly interpret observed patterns of genetic differentiation in practical situations, the expected FSTs and the statistical properties (i.e., power analysis) of the genetic markers used should be evaluated, taking the observed allele frequency distributions into consideration.

  • 8.
    Luikart, Gordon
    et al.
    University of Montana.
    Ryman, Nils
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen. Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen, Avdelningen för populationsgenetik.
    Tallmon, David A.
    University of Alaska.
    Schwartz, Michael K.
    USDA Forest Service.
    Allendorf, Fred W.
    7.Victoria University of Wellington School of Biological Sciences.
    Estimation of census and effective population sizes  : the increasing usefulness of DNA-based approaches2010Inngår i: Conservation Genetics, ISSN 1566-0621, E-ISSN 1572-9737, Vol. 11, s. 355-373Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Population census size (N C) and effective population sizes (N e) are two crucial parameters that influence population viability, wildlife management decisions, and conservation planning. Genetic estimators of both N C and N e are increasingly widely used because molecular markers are increasingly available, statistical methods are improving rapidly, and genetic estimators complement or improve upon traditional demographic estimators. We review the kinds and applications of estimators of both N C and N e, and the often undervalued and misunderstood ratio of effective-to-census size (N e /N C). We focus on recently improved and well evaluated methods that are most likely to facilitate conservation. Finally, we outline areas of future research to improve N e and N C estimation in wild populations

  • 9.
    Norén, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen. University of California Davis, USA.
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Wallén, Johan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Meijer, Tomas
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen. National Veterinary Institute, Sweden.
    Sacks, Benjamin N.
    Red foxes colonizing the tundra: genetic analysis as a tool for population management2017Inngår i: Conservation Genetics, ISSN 1566-0621, E-ISSN 1572-9737, Vol. 18, nr 2, s. 359-370Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change accelerates biodiversity alterations in northern ecosystems. A prevalent example is that tundra regions are invaded by boreal species. This impacts negatively on native species through competition, predation and transmission of zoonoses. Scandinavian red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) have emerged into the tundra and have altered the structure and function of the tundra community. For instance, they threaten persistence of the endangered Swedish Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus). County board administrations implement control of the tundra red foxes, but little is known about the underlying expansion dynamics. A broad-scale study revealed high connectivity where northern areas were supplemented with red foxes from surrounding population. However, red fox expansion is most prevalent in tundra regions and the fine-scaled expansion dynamics in these areas have not yet been disseminated. With the aim of identifying the invasive pathways of tundra red foxes, we present microsatellite data for 205 Swedish red foxes and mitochondrial sequence variation in 102 foxes sampled across the historical boreo-nemoral distribution and recently colonized tundra regions. Genetic structuring was low with high levels of ongoing, asymmetric dispersal from surrounding boreal zones into tundra habitats causing high genetic admixture. In both tundra and boreo-nemoral regions, inter-individual relatedness decreased with increasing geographic distance and data suggests male-biased dispersal patterns. Overall, fine-scaled expansion patterns were affected by multiple factors and we discuss its implications for future red fox management.

  • 10.
    Palme, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen, Avdelningen för populationsgenetik.
    Laikre, Linda
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen, Avdelningen för populationsgenetik.
    Ryman, Nils
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen, Avdelningen för populationsgenetik.
    Monitoring reveals two genetically distinct brown trout populations remaining in stable sympatry over 20 years in tiny mountain lakes2013Inngår i: Conservation Genetics, ISSN 1566-0621, E-ISSN 1572-9737, Vol. 14, nr 4, s. 795-808Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Detecting population subdivision when apparent barriers to gene flow are lacking is important in evolutionary and conservation biology. Recent research indicates that intraspecific population complexity can be crucial for maintaining a species' evolutionary potential, productivity, and ecological role. We monitored the genetic relationships at 14 allozyme loci among similar to 4,000 brown trout (Salmo trutta) collected during 19 years from two small interconnected mountain lakes (0.10 and 0.17 km(2), respectively) in central Sweden. There were no allele frequency differences between the lakes. However, heterozygote deficiencies within lakes became obvious after a few years of monitoring. Detailed analyses were then carried out without a priori grouping of samples, revealing unexpected differentiation patterns: (i) the same two genetically distinct (F (ST) a parts per thousand yen 0.10) populations occur sympatrically at about equal frequencies within both lakes, (ii) the genetic subdivision is not coupled with apparent phenotypical dichotomies, (iii) this cryptic structure remains stable over the two decades monitored, and (iv) the point estimates of effective population size are c. 120 and 190, respectively, indicating that genetic drift is important in this system. A subsample of 382 fish was also analyzed for seven microsatellites. The genetic pattern does not follow that of the allozymes, and in this subsample the presence of multiple populations would have gone undetected if only scoring microsatellites. Sympatric populations may be more common than anticipated, but difficult to detect when individuals cannot be grouped appropriately, or when markers or sample sizes are insufficient to provide adequate statistical power with approaches not requiring prior grouping.

  • 11.
    Tison, Jean-Luc
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylär biovetenskap, Wenner-Grens institut. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Blennow, Victor
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Palkopoulou, Eleftheria
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Petra
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Roos, Anna
    Dalén, Love
    Population structure and recent temporal changes in genetic variation in Eurasian otters from Sweden2015Inngår i: Conservation Genetics, ISSN 1566-0621, E-ISSN 1572-9737, Vol. 16, nr 2, s. 371-384Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra) population in Sweden went through a drastic decline in population size between the 1950s and 1980s, caused mostly by anthropogenic factors such as high hunting pressure and the introduction of environmental toxic chemicals into the otter's habitats. However, after the bans of PCBs and DDT in the 1970s, the population began to recover in the 1990s. This study compares microsatellite data across twelve loci from historical and contemporary otter samples to investigate whether there has been a change in population structure and genetic diversity across time in various locations throughout Sweden. The results suggest that otters in the south were more severely affected by the bottleneck, demonstrated by a decline in genetic diversity and a shift in genetic composition. In contrast, the genetic composition in otters from northern Sweden remained mostly unchanged, both in terms of population structure and diversity. This suggests that the decline was not uniform across the country. Moreover, our analyses of historical samples provide an overview of the level of genetic variation and population structure that existed prior to the bottleneck, which may be helpful for the future management and conservation of the species.

  • 12. Wiemann, Annika
    et al.
    Andersen, Liselotte W.
    Berggren, Per
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Siebert, Ursula
    Benke, Harald
    Teilmann, Jonas
    Lockyer, Christina
    Pawliczka, Iwona
    Skora, Krzysztof
    Roos, Anna
    Lyrholm, Thomas
    Paulus, Kirsten B.
    Ketmaier, Valerio
    Tiedemann, Ralph
    Mitochondrial Control Region and microsatellite analyses on harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) unravel population differentiation in the Baltic Sea and adjacent waters2010Inngår i: Conservation Genetics, ISSN 1566-0621, E-ISSN 1572-9737, Vol. 11, nr 1, s. 195-211Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The population status of the harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) in the Baltic area has been a continuous matter of debate. Here we present the by far most comprehensive genetic population structure assessment to date for this region, both with regard to geographic coverage and sample size: 497 porpoise samples from North Sea, Skagerrak, Kattegat, Belt Sea, and Inner Baltic Sea were sequenced at the mitochondrial Control Region and 305 of these specimens were typed at 15 polymorphic microsatellite loci. Samples were stratified according to sample type (stranding vs. by-caught), sex, and season (breeding vs. non-breeding season). Our data provide ample evidence for a population split between the Skagerrak and the Belt Sea, with a transition zone in the Kattegat area. Among other measures, this was particularly visible in significant frequency shifts of the most abundant mitochondrial haplotypes. A particular haplotype almost absent in the North Sea was the most abundant in Belt Sea and Inner Baltic Sea. Microsatellites yielded a similar pattern (i.e., turnover in occurrence of clusters identified by STRUCTURE). Moreover, a highly significant association between microsatellite assignment and unlinked mitochondrial haplotypes further indicates a split between North Sea and Baltic porpoises. For the Inner Baltic Sea, we consistently recovered a small, but significant separation from the Belt Sea population. Despite recent arguments that separation should exceed a predefined threshold before populations shall be managed separately, we argue in favour of precautionary acknowledging the Inner Baltic porpoises as a separate management unit, which should receive particular attention, as it is threatened by various factors, in particular local fishery measures.

1 - 12 of 12
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf